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Art & Design

Art in Action: Coloring

The Braintree Public Schools' Art and Design Department believes that art is fundamental to the total education of all students. We believe that art develops creative problem solving skills and independent thinking; and that by shaping and forming works of art, students communicate essential human concepts. In our visual culture, art and design is a major form of communication. Students conceive and develop artistic ideas, present and interpret artworks, respond to and evaluate how artworks convey meaning, and connect artistic works with personal meaning and other external content.

The Braintree Public School Art and Design Department provides a sequential K-12 curriculum based on creative problem solving and an exposure to and exploration of a broad spectrum of art media. The curriculum is continuously updated to reflect changes in the state and national standards. Students participate in art classes once each week at the elementary level, three days out of a six-day rotation at the middle school level, and every day at the high school level.

The elementary art program builds from kindergarten through grade five. Students acquire observational and technical skills. They learn to communicate their ideas visually and to express themselves with an increasing art vocabulary. In this process students develop self-awareness. They study art, artists, art movements and the connection of art to other subject areas. By providing opportunities to creatively problem solve and to use high level thinking skills, the elementary art program increases student learning in all areas of the curriculum.

The art program at the middle school gives all students an opportunity to explore new ideas and materials, to develop skills and techniques, and to express visual and sensory experiences. The curriculum emphasizes perception and imaginative thinking and encourages experimentation, as the students are encouraged to develop their individuality. In the sixth, seventh, and eighth grades, the students will find multiple opportunities to be creative, to practice problem solving, and to develop an awareness and appreciation of art forms past and present.

The Braintree High School Art and Design Department has developed all of its courses to lead through sequential and vertically aligned pathways in Drawing and Painting, 2D Design, and 3D Design. Each track builds students’ skills to prepare them for further study including the rigor of AP Studio Art courses. The high school art and design department boasts two, 25-station digital labs equipped with Adobe Master Collection CS6. The new 3D Design room is spacious and well-equipped. A variety of vibrant afterschool art clubs and activities provide further enrichment for students on the middle and high school levels. Students submit work annually to the national Scholastic Art Awards; two regional programs sponsored by the Massachusetts Art Education Association, Art All-State and Youth Art Month; and locally, with the Braintree ARTFest and the Art Stars program at the South Shore Art Center in Cohasset. The art department is sponsoring a first time trip to France called “ART and France” for nine days during April vacation to explore the art and culture of the region. Students will create sketches, drawings and photographs to document their adventures and, on return, mount an exhibition of their works.

Staff

Director

Heidi Hurley

Teachers

Kara Asher

South Middle School

Julie Campisano

East Middle School

Leigh Champagne

Highlands Elementary School, Flaherty Elementary School

Johanna Chase

Braintree High School

Bailey Davidson

Highlands Elementary School

Ingrid Gay

Flaherty Elementary School

Heidi Hurley

Braintree High School

Joseph Keaney

Braintree High School, Liberty Elementary School

Marina Michaelidis

Braintree High School

Elizabeth Pyliotis

South Middle School

Maureen Riley

Liberty Elementary School, Flaherty Elementary School

Anne Schulze

East Middle School

Carla Valentine

South Middle School

ELL

English Language Learners Word Collage
The Braintree Public Schools, in keeping with M.G.L. Chapter 71A, places all students in classrooms in which the language of instruction is English and provides a Sheltered English Immersion (SEI) program to English learners to ensure their academic success.

The SEI program advances social and academic language development and academic achievement for English language learners (ELLs) in four learning domains: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. SEI has two components:

  • English Language Development (ELD) instruction, which is explicit, direct instruction about the English language intended to promote English language acquisition by ELL students and to help them “catch up” to their student peers who are proficient in English. This instruction follows the WIDA standards for ELLs that were adopted by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and are tied to the Common Core State Standards. ELD instruction addresses social and academic vocabulary, grammar and syntax commonly used in both social and academic communication, habits and norms of social and academic interaction in American schools, and strategies that promote second language learning and content learning. In our ELD classrooms, learning takes place when there is sustained verbal interaction, often in small groups, as the students complete carefully designed academic tasks that include speaking, listening, reading and writing. Effective ELD instruction is often characterized by the use of thematic units, project-based instruction, and language instruction closely aligned with grade-appropriate content standards.
  • Sheltered content instruction, which is instruction that includes approaches, strategies, and methodology that make the content of the lesson more comprehensible to students who are not yet proficient in English. Sheltered content classes are characterized by active engagement with ELL students, language objectives that address the linguistic requirements of the content to be taught (e.g. content vocabulary), and content objectives based on standards from the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. Features of sheltered content instruction are as follows:
    • frequent opportunities for interaction and discussion between teacher/student and among students that encourage elaborated responses by students about lesson concepts.
    • supplementary materials that support the content objectives and contextualize learning. Examples of these materials include hands-on manipulatives, pictures, visuals, multimedia, demonstrations, adapted text, and graphic organizers.
    • the teaching of vocabulary and the teaching of content.
    • the use of speech appropriate for students’ English proficiency level.
    • a clear and explicit explanation of academic tasks.
    • content that is adapted, including texts, assignments, and assessments and presentation of content in all modalities within the student’s English proficiency level.
    • regular opportunities for students to practice and apply new language and content knowledge in English.

Staff

Teachers

Patricia Bagnell

Braintree High School, East Middle School

Karen Baho

Liberty Elementary School

Heather Bowen

Ross Elementary School

Jessica Cabral

Morrison Elementary School

Rebecca Fazio

Braintree High School

Jacqueline Gonzalez

Morrison Elementary School

Rosario McDonagh

Morrison Elementary School

Elise McHugh

Hollis Elementary School

Mary Nelligan

Flaherty Elementary School

Kellie Pendley

East Middle School

Truc-Van Phung

Highlands Elementary School

Andrea Sherbakov

Monatiquot Kindergarten Center

Anastasia Zis

South Middle School

English Learner Parent Advisory Council

ELPAC Involvement includes:

  • Parents of English Learners working with the ELE coordinators in setting up an EL Parent Advisory Council
  • Meeting 3-4 times per year
  • Advising the district in developing its English Learner Education program

If you are interested, please contact Karen Baho,Elementary English Learner Coordinator, at Kbaho@braintreema.gov or 781.380.0210 x.5902

English

English Word Collage

The Braintree Public Schools’ English Language Arts curriculum is aligned with the Massachusetts ELA Frameworks. Throughout their studies in ELA, students learn the connections between reading and writing. They read as writers and write as readers in a variety of genres, including essays, articles, stories, letters, poems, and scripts. Students develop their skills in topic development, organization, and style as they master the grammar and conventions of the language.

In grades PK through 3, the balanced literacy program provides a comprehensive approach to teaching reading and language arts. Students develop the five essential elements of reading (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and text comprehension) through engaging whole class and small group activities. As learners progress in our literacy program, they develop fourth and fifth grade literacy skills using authentic literature in reading and writing workshop.

In grades six through eight, students participate in proficient or advanced cluster middle school English courses to further refine their reading and writing skills. Teachers engage students with real-world reading tasks and challenging writing assignments to prepare students for continued academic rigor and to promote smart study skills. In addition to English classes, all students participate in a writing development course sequence over grades seven and eight.

Braintree High School’s English department provides all students with the foundation they need for collegiate success. Students in grades nine through eleven take required courses in world and American literature with a specific focus on research, rhetorical analysis, and analytical writing. In grade twelve, all students choose from a menu of semester electives to further their study of specific genres and topics in literature. Some students elect to replace core eleventh and twelfth grade courses with a two-year sequence of Advanced Placement classes. Beyond the core curriculum, the department offers a four-year elective sequence in television production and broadcast journalism using the BCAM studio at BHS.

Staff

Director

Rock Roberts

Teachers

Heather Auer

East Middle School
School: 3402

Andrea Bartlett

East Middle School
School: 3404

Patricia Bartlett

Liberty Elementary School

Jessica Bethka

East Middle School
School: 3405

Claire Brady

Ross Elementary School

Marisa Ciani

Braintree High School, English BHS

Patrick Condon

East Middle School
School: 3413

Patricia Cook

Highlands Elementary School

Nicole Cottam

South Middle School, 8th Grade Team

Patricia Cotter

Hollis Elementary School

Kellie-Anne Crane

East Middle School

Dawn Culbertson

Braintree High School, English BHS

Amy Cushing

South Middle School, Braintree High School, English BHS

Conor Daley

Braintree High School, English BHS

Jenna Dooley

East Middle School
School: 3418

Elisabeth Evans

South Middle School, 8th Grade Team

Alyson Gorman

Braintree High School, English BHS

Jennifer Heckman

South Middle School, 8th Grade Team

Pamela Hunter

East Middle School
School: 3429

Sheila Ilyinskii

Hollis Elementary School

Alex Jefferies

Braintree High School, English BHS

Victoria Joyce

Braintree High School, English BHS

Toni Kanes

East Middle School
School: 3431

Laura Lebo

Braintree High School, English BHS

Kimberly Matakanski

Morrison Elementary School

Tierney Miller

East Middle School
School: 3442

Stephanie Motta

South Middle School, Discovery Team, AustraliaTeam, Navigators Team, 8th Grade Team, Shutter Shades Team

Lisa Murphy

Braintree High School, English BHS

Julie Murray

Morrison Elementary School

Paul Nellis

Braintree High School, English BHS

Erin Newell

Highlands Elementary School

Christine Norris

South Middle School, Navigators Team

Emily Panza

Braintree High School, English BHS

Eric Parry

Braintree High School, English BHS

Kelly Proulx

South Middle School, Discovery Team

Michael Puglisi

South Middle School, Shutter Shades Team

Rock Roberts

District, Braintree High School, English BHS

Anne Rodzwicz

Braintree High School, English BHS

Courtney Rollo

Braintree High School, English BHS

Danielle Romeo

Ross Elementary School

Samantha Sarantakis

Braintree High School, English BHS

Marissa Sinclair

Flaherty Elementary School

Michael Stewart

East Middle School
School: 3464

Jennifer Suchocki

South Middle School, AustraliaTeam

Justin Taylor

South Middle School, Navigators Team, Shutter Shades Team

Barbara Tellier

East Middle School
School: 3468

Alissa Wallenstein

Braintree High School, English BHS

Kera Wiggin

Braintree High School, English BHS

Health & Wellness

Health & Wellness Word Collage

"Physical fitness is not only one of the most important keys to a healthy body, it is the basis of dynamic and creative intellectual activity." ~ John F. Kennedy

 

Elementary School (K-5)

The Elementary Physical Education Program is aligned with The Massachusetts Comprehensive Health Curriculum Frameworks & National Standards, which de-emphasizes competition, and re-emphasizes skill attainment & self-accomplishment, with every student involved at all times: physically, mentally, & socially. Students will learn the language of movement, so that they may apply basic strategies and skills to a variety of sports and wellness activities.

Middle School (6-8)

The Middle School Physical Education provides students the opportunity to learn through a developmentally appropriate, comprehensive sequentially planned physical education program aligned with the Massachusetts Comprehensive Health Curriculum Frameworks. The physical education courses meet three times per cycle for the entire year. The program is designed to help students develop movement skill combinations and movement skill knowledge; the assessment and maintenance of physical fitness to improve health and performance, and the requisite knowledge of physical fitness concepts, principles and strategies; and the application of psychological and sociological concepts, including self-responsibility, positive social interaction, and group dynamics, in the learning and performance of physical activity

7th Grade Health

The seventh grade health education course meets three times per cycle for half the year. The curriculum is aligned with the Massachusetts Health Curriculum Framework to provide students with the knowledge and skills needed to make healthy choices, responsible decisions, maintain positive attitudes and healthy bodies. The health content areas include personal health, hygiene, nutrition and fitness, alcohol and other drugs, personal safety, mental and emotional wellness, disease prevention, violence prevention and conflict resolution.

Braintree High School (9-12)

The Health and Wellness department aligns it’s curriculum with the Massachusetts Comprehensive Health Curriculum Framework. The goal of the department is to encourage students to develop active lifestyles for overall health benefits. This will enable students to develop to their fullest potential through the acquisition of daily living skills and the behaviors necessary to make good decisions in life. Through a diversified Physical Education program students are encouraged to develop skills and positive attitudes toward lifelong participation in exercise. Physical Education is a graduation requirement for all four years. The Health Education program offers freshmen health and electives for 10th, 11th, and 12th grade students.

Links

Wellness Policy

Braintree Public Schools Wellness Policies on Physical Activity and Nutrition

 

Approved by School Committee 5/7/2012


In 2010, Congress passed the Child Nutrition Reauthorization Act, the federal law funding school “nutrition programs.” The law requires all school districts receiving federal funds for school meals to establish a wellness policy.

 

 

 

The health and well being of the children in Braintree Public Schools have traditionally been addressed in several ways. The Braintree Public Schools Strategic Plan for 2010-2015 includes the belief that “Students should acquire the knowledge, skills and motivation necessary to achieve and maintain optimum health and lifelong fitness.” Similarly, the Massachusetts Curriculum Health Framework Core Concept addresses wellness through health literacy, self-management skills, and health promotion. Comprehensive health education teaches fundamental health concepts, promotes habits and conduct that enhance health and wellness, and guides efforts to build healthy families, relationships, schools and communities. The goals of BPS Strategic Plan and the Health Curriculum Framework are central to the development of the Braintree Public Schools Wellness Policy.

This policy has been developed to meet the requirement and is based on the following:

  • Children need access to healthful foods and opportunities to be physically active in order to grow, learn, and thrive;
  • Children need to understand the implication of healthy habits for self and society;
  • Good health fosters student attendance and education;
  • Obesity rates have doubled in children and tripled in adolescents over the last two decades, and physical inactivity and excessive calorie intake are the predominant causes of obesity;
  • Heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes are responsible for two-thirds of deaths in the United States, and major risk factors for those diseases, including unhealthy eating habits, physical inactivity, and obesity, often are established in childhood;

 

The Braintree Public School District is committed to providing school environments that promote and protect children’s health, well-being, and ability to learn by supporting healthy eating and physical activity. Therefore, it is the policy of the Braintree Public School District that:

  • The Braintree Alliance for Safe and healthy Youth will engage students, parents, teachers, food service professionals, health professionals, and other interested community members in developing, implementing, monitoring, and reviewing this policy.
  • All students in grades K-12 will have opportunities, support, and encouragement to be physically active on a regular basis.
  • Foods and beverages sold or served at school will meet the nutrition recommendations of the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, will comply with all State and Federal laws and will adhere to food safety and security guidelines.
  • A Registered Dietician will provide students with access to a variety of affordable, nutritious, and appealing foods that meet the health and nutrition needs of students; will accommodate the religious, ethnic, and cultural diversity of the student body in meal planning; and will provide clean, safe, and pleasant settings.
  • All schools in our district will participate in available federal school meal programs, including the School Breakfast Program, and the National School Lunch Program. An afternoon snack program is available at Braintree High School.
  • Schools will provide nutrition education and physical education to foster lifelong habits of healthy eating and physical activity, and will establish linkages between health education and school meal programs, and with related community services.

 

 

TO ACHIEVE THESE POLICY GOALS:

 

I. Braintree Alliance for Safe and Healthy Youth

 

The Braintree Alliance for Safe and Healthy Youth will develop, implement, monitor, review, and, as necessary, revise the district wellness policy.

II. Nutritional Quality of Foods and Beverages Sold and Served on Campus

School Meals

Meals served through the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs will:

  • be appealing and attractive to children;
  • be served in clean and pleasant settings;
  • meet, at a minimum, nutrition requirements established by local, state, and federal statutes and regulations;
  • offer a variety of fruits and vegetables;
  • offer low fat and/or fat free milk daily; offer a variety of bread and bread products, including an assortment of whole grain bread products.

 

Breakfast. To ensure that all children have breakfast, either at home or at school, in order to meet their nutritional needs and enhance their ability to learn:

  • Braintree Public Schools will operate the School Breakfast Program;
  • The Food Services Director will notify parents and students of the availability of the School Breakfast Program;
  • Schools will reinforce the importance of a healthy breakfast through newsletter articles, take-home materials, or other means provided from the food services department.

Free and Reduced-priced Meals. The Director of Food Services will mail applications to all families each August. Braintree Public Schools will make every effort to eliminate any social stigma attached to, and prevent the overt identification of, students who are eligible for free and reduced-price school meals.

 

 

Meal Times and Scheduling. Braintree Public Schools:

  • will provide students with at least 10 minutes to eat after sitting down for breakfast and 20 minutes after sitting down for lunch (to the extent possible);
  • will schedule lunch periods between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.;
  • will not schedule tutoring, club, or organizational meetings or activities during mealtimes, unless students may eat during such activities;
  • to the extent possible, will schedule lunch periods in elementary schools to follow recess periods;
  • to the extent possible, will schedule physical education classes to be held before lunch or at least 20 minutes after the consumption of lunch.

Qualifications of School Food Service Staff. A Registered Dietician will administer the school meal program. As part of the school district’s responsibility to operate a food service program, we will provide continuing professional development for all nutrition professionals in schools. Staff development programs should include appropriate certification and/or training programs for the registered dietician, school nutrition managers, and cafeteria workers, according to their levels of responsibility.

 

 

Sharing of Foods and Beverages. Braintree Public School staff will discourage students from sharing their foods or beverages with one another during meal or snack times, given concerns about allergies and other restrictions on some children’s diets.

 

Nutrition information. for all food and food products made available on campus is readily available for review. The Food Services Department may review all food and beverage items sold or provided to students.

À la carte and competitive foods. In accordance with the Massachusetts School Nutrition Law, (http://www.malegislature.gov/Laws/SessionLaws/Acts...) all foods sold or provided to students outside of the National School Lunch Program or School Breakfast Program (aka competitive foods, see definitions below) will meet the standards outlined below. The standards will apply from 30 minutes before the beginning of the school day to 30 minutes after the end of the school day, with the exception of vending machines which shall comply with these standards at all times.

 

Competitive foods are defined as foods and beverages sold or provided in:

  • School cafeterias offered as à la carte items
  • School buildings, including classrooms and hallways
  • School stores
  • School snack bars
  • Vending machines (including the staff/faculty room)
  • Concession stands
  • Booster sales
  • Fundraising activities
  • School-sponsored or school-related events
  • Any other location on school property

This applies to classroom incentives, classroom parties, celebrations (birthdays, holidays, etc.) during the school day including 30 minutes before the beginning of the school day to 30 minutes after the end of the school day. This does NOT apply to an individual’s snack or lunch for self consumption. Snacks or foods brought into the school building for distribution to multiple students must comply with the standards below. For more information about the standards contact the director of Food and Nutrition services Megan Ahrenholz (781) 380-0144 or mahrenholz@braintreema.gov.

Beverages

Food

Juice

  • 100% fruit or vegetable juice;
  • No added sugar
  • Portion Limit: 4 oz (no calorie limit)

 

Calories

  • No more than 200 calories per food item; except a la carte entrées which shall not exceed calories of comparable NSLP entrée items.

 

Milk & Milk Substitutes

  • Must be 1% or Fat Free
  • 8 oz portion limit
  • Flavored milk & milk substitutes contain no more than 22 g sugar per 8 oz.

 

 

Fat & Saturated Fat

  • No more than 35% of total calories from fat*
  • No more than 10% of total calories from saturated fat*
  • All foods to be trans fat free.
  • * Exceptions: 1 oz nuts, seeds, nut butters or reduced-fat cheese.

 

Sugar

  • No more than 35% of total calories from sugar*
  • *Exceptions: 100% fruit w/ no added sugar; and non-fat or low-fat yogurt, including drinkable yogurt, w/no more than 30 g total sugar per 8 oz package

 

Water

  • Contains no added sugar, sweeteners or artificial sweeteners, but may contain natural flavorings and/or carbonation.

 

Sodium

  • No more than 200 mg sodium per item; except a la carte entrées which shall contain no more than 480 mg sodium per item.

 

 

Grains

  • All bread and other grain-based products must be whole grain (i.e. whole grain should be listed first in the ingredient statement)

 

 

Food & Beverages

 

  • No food/ beverage shall contain artificial sweeteners
  • No food/beverage shall contain more than trace amounts of caffeine
  • A packaged item may contain no more than one serving per package

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




 

 

 

(http://take.actionforhealthykids.org/site/DocServer/MA_School_Nutrition_Bill_At-A-Glance_Guide_FINAL.pdf?docID=2901)

Water To comply with the requirements of the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 and the Massachusetts Act Relative to School Nutrition, water will be made available to all students during the school day without charge. Each Braintree Public School will have water fountains available for students to consume water. In schools which do not have a fountain inside or immediately outside the cafeteria, water will be provided in cups at no charge, as needed.

 

 

Snacks Snacks sold or provided by any employee of Braintree Public Schools or other enrichment program from 30 minutes before the beginning of the school day to 30 minutes after the end of the school day will meet the nutrition standards outlined above. This includes classroom incentives, classroom parties and celebrations. It is not necessary to involve food to reward a class or student. Braintree Public School wants to be consistent in promoting a healthy environment, implementing the standards during the entire school day prevents sending mix messages.

Schools will assess if and when to offer time for snack consumption based on timing of school meals, children’s nutritional needs, children’s ages, and other considerations. At the beginning of the school year the district will disseminate an “A-List” of healthful snack items to teachers, after-school program personnel, and parents/guardians. The “A-List” is a list of products that meet the Massachusetts Action for Healthy Kids’ and Massachusetts Competitive Food and Beverage Standards. The list will include suggestions for snacks that will make a positive contribution to children’s diets and health, with an emphasis on serving fruits and vegetables as the primary snacks and water as the primary beverage. The “A-List” will be available on the Braintree Public Schools website under the School Lunch Program link, in all school cafeterias, and on all individual schools websites.

Food Safety and Food Security. All foods made available through the food services department will comply with state and local food safety and sanitation regulations. Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) plans and guidelines are implemented to prevent foodborne illness in schools. For the safety and security of the food and facility, access to the food services operations area are limited to Food Services Staff and authorized personnel.

 

III. Nutrition and Physical Activity Promotion

 

Nutrition Education and Promotion. The Braintree Public School District aims to teach, encourage, and support healthy eating by students through:

  • nutrition education will be integrated into the physical education, and health education curriculum;
  • promoting fruits, vegetables, whole grain products, low-fat and fat-free dairy products, healthy food preparation methods, and health-enhancing nutrition practices;
  • emphasizing caloric balance between food intake and energy expenditure (physical activity/exercise);
  • linking with school meal programs, other school foods, and nutrition-related community services;
  • promotion of media literacy in nutrition.

 

Integrating Physical Activity into the Classroom Setting

  • classroom health education will complement physical education by reinforcing the knowledge and self-management skills needed to maintain a physically-active lifestyle and to reduce time spent on sedentary activities, such as watching television;
  • opportunities for physical activity will be incorporated into other subject lessons as possible.

Communications with Parents. The Braintree Public School district will support parents’/guardians’ efforts to provide a healthy diet and daily physical activity for their children. The Food Service director will provide nutrient analyses of school menus and will offer an explanation of the analysis upon request.

The physical education department with permission from building principal will provide information about physical education and other school-based physical activity opportunities before, during, and after the school day; and support parents’/guardians’ efforts to provide their children with opportunities to be physically active outside of school. Such supports will include sharing information about physical activity and physical education through school newsletters, or other take-home materials, special events, or physical education homework.

Staff Wellness. The Braintree Public School District highly values the health and well-being of every staff member. Staff members are encouraged to use the physical fitness centers located at Braintree High School, East Middle School and South Middle School before and/or after school hours.

 

IV. Physical Activity Opportunities and Physical Education
 

 

Physical Education (P.E.) K-12. All students in grades K-12, including students with disabilities, special health-care needs, and in alternative educational programs, will participate in physical education classes equivalent to:

  • Kindergarten - One 30 minute period per week
  • Full Day Kindergarten - Two 30 minute periods per week
  • Grades 1 & 2 - Two 30 minute periods per week
  • Grades 3 & 4 - Two 35 minute periods per week
  • Grade 5 - Two 40 minute periods per week
  • Grades 6 – 8 - Three 45 minutes periods per six day cycle
  • Grades 9 –12 - Two 49 minute periods per seven day cycle

A certified physical education teacher will teach all physical education classes. Physical education classes will be an environment where students learn, practice and are assessed on developmentally appropriate motor skills, social skills and knowledge. Physical education classes will include instruction in individual activities as well as competitive and non-competitive team sports to encourage life-long physical activity. Adequate equipment will be available for all students to participate in physical education classes. Physical activity facilities on school grounds will be safe. Physical education classes will provide a physical and social environment that encourages safe and enjoyable activities for all students. In collaboration with the nursing department Body Mass Index (BMI) results will be sent home to students in grades 1, 4, 7 and 10 in the fall informing parents/guardians of their child’s height, weight, body mass index, and 4th grade students will receive a Fitnessgram profile. Information will be provided to families to help them incorporate physical activity into their lives through the individual school newsletters.

Daily Recess. All elementary school students will have daily-supervised recess, preferably outdoors, during which schools should encourage, verbally and through the provision of space and equipment, moderate to vigorous physical activity. To the extent possible, schools will endeavor to schedule recess prior to lunch since research indicated that physical activity prior to lunch can increase the nutrient intake and reduce food waste.


Physical Activity Opportunities Before and After School. The middle and high schools will offer extracurricular physical activity programs, such as physical activity clubs or intramural programs. The high school, and middle schools as appropriate, will offer interscholastic sports programs. Braintree Public Schools will offer a range of activities that meet the needs, interests, and abilities of all students, including boys, girls, students with disabilities, and students with special health-care needs.

Use of School Facilities Outside of School Hours. The Braintree Public School facilities are available to community agencies and organizations after the school day, on weekends, and during school vacations. Any school employees, person, groups or organization that uses BPS facilities and plans to serve food must submit a temporary food permit application along with a building permit, not later than one week prior to the event. In addition, all bake sales will follow the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and Braintree Board of Health regulations as described in M.G.L. c.94, s1. Contact the building principal to obtain a building permit, a temporary food permit application and for information on rental of facilities.

 

Other School Based Activities. Support for health of all students is demonstrated by:

  • in accordance with Massachusetts State Regulations, 105 CMR 2000.000, health screenings will be conducted as follows:
    • Hearing screening – will occur in the year of school entry and annually through grade 3 (or by age 9 in the case of ungraded classrooms), once in grades 6 through 8 (ages 12 through 14 in the case of ungraded classrooms), and once in grades 9 through 12 (ages 15 through 18 in the case of ungraded classrooms);
    • Vision screening - will occur in the year of school entry and annually through grade 5 (or by age 9 in the case of ungraded classrooms), once in grades 6 through 8 (ages 12 through 14 in the case of ungraded classrooms), and once in grades 9 through 12 (ages 15 through 18 in the case of ungraded classrooms);
    • Postural screening – will occur annually in grades 5 through 9 (ages 11-15 in the case of ungraded classrooms);
    • Height, Weight and BMI (Body Mass Index) screening will occur in grades 1, 4, 7 and 10. Massachusetts Department of Public Health guidelines are followed during all health screenings;to the extent possible, an annual health fair for grade 11;
  • assisting children who do not have health insurance by linking parents with Mass Health or the Children’s Medical Security Plan.

 

V. Monitoring and Policy Review

 

Monitoring and Review. The superintendent or designee will ensure compliance with this district-wide wellness policy. In each school, the principal or designee will ensure compliance with those policies in his/her school and will report on the school’s compliance to the school district superintendent or designee.

School food service staff, at the school or district level, will ensure compliance with nutrition policies within school food service areas and will report on this matter to the business manager.

The Physical Education Director will monitor compliance with the physical activity portion of the policy.

The superintendent or designee will develop a summary report every three years on district-wide compliance with the district’s established nutrition and physical activity wellness policies, based on input from schools within the district. That report will be provided to the school board and also distributed to all school improvement councils as well as the Braintree Alliance for Safe and Healthy Youth, parent/teacher organizations, school principals, and school health services personnel in the district.

Every three years, the school district will review the wellness policy including the nutrition and physical education policies and program elements. The district will, as necessary, revise the wellness policy and develop work plans to facilitate their implementation.

Joining the Wellness Policy Committee

How do I join the Braintree Public Schools Wellness Policy Committee?

The Braintree Public Schools Wellness Committee is a subcommittee of the Braintree Alliance for Safe and Healthy Youth (BASHY).

BASHY meets four times per school year and the Wellness Policy Committee may have meetings in addition to the BASHY meetings.

The mission of BASHY is to provide a community wide effort to support both school and community programs and projects which promote comprehensive school health and human services including: health education, tobacco, alcohol and other drug prevention, a safe and healthy environment, nutrition and wellness.

At the meetings we discuss what is happening in Braintree Public Schools and the community in regards to these topics. We review program goals, objectives and activities, monitor program effectiveness and provide input for program development and improvement. Each year we plan a parent/guardian educational evening called, “Making a Difference.”

Students, Parents, teachers, food service professionals, health professionals, administrators, and all interested community members are invited to join BASHY and/or the Wellness Policy Committee.

Members of the Wellness Policy Committee will collaborate to develop, implement, monitor and review the Wellness Policy.

Tips About Nutrition and Physical Exercise

~Did you know that the original bottle of coke had 97 calories? Now a bottle has 242 calories. That means there would be 20 teaspoons of sugar in the 20 ounce bottle of coke.

8 oz. Coke Bottle

Coke Can12 oz. Coke Bottle
Original
8-ounce bottle


12 ounce can


20-ounce bottle

97 calories

145 calories

242 calories


~ Do you reach for a snack when you’re bored, nervous, happy, angry, or tense? If you do, you may be eating when you’re not hungry. Find other ways to handle your feelings. Go for a walk, listen to music, or call a friend.

~The recommendation is to get sixty minutes of moderate exercise each day. Moderate exercise can be a brisk walk, aerobics, bike riding, playing basketball, running, etc.

~ Hydration Hint: Drink 8 ounces of fluid 20 minutes to 30 minutes prior to exercise or during a warm-up.

~MYTH Low-fat or fat-free means no calories. You can eat more foods if they are low fat or fat free. FACT: Low fat or fat free does not mean calorie free. A low-fat or fat free food is OFTEN lower in calories than the same size portion of the full-fat product. But many processed low-fat or fat-free foods have just as many calories or more than the full-fat version of the same food.

~Smart Drink Tip ~ Choose drinks with no more than 25 calories per 8-ounce serving, and notice how many servings are in one drink.

~What can exercise do for me?

  • Exercise improves your mood.
  • Exercise combats chronic diseases.
  • Exercise helps you maintain a healthy weight.
  • Exercise strengthens your heart and lungs.
  • Exercise promotes better sleep.

~ Here are some pre-game snack suggestions:

  • Whole-grain bread, crackers, tortillas, or pretzels
  • Cereal (as long as it's not high in sugar)
  • Enriched pasta or brown rice
  • Plain popcorn
  • Low-fat cheese, yogurt, pudding or milk
  • Turkey, chicken, tofu
  • Apples, bananas, pears, oranges
  • Carrots, sugar snap peas, cucumbers

~ Experts agree the first two hours after a workout is when the body’s real work begins ~ refueling, building and repairing muscles. Post work – out snacks; chocolate milk, tuna on whole wheat, banana and peanut butter, turkey and cheese, apple slices and pretzels.

~Lack of water is the biggest cause of daytime fatigue. Aim to drink 8 glasses of water each day.

The Right Foods That Can Improve Your Mood

Recovery Drinks

  • The best drink to consume after a workout has a mix of both carbohydrate and protein.
  • Chocolate milk
    • Has the perfect ratio –superior to commercially sold protein sports drinks
    • Provides fluids and electrolytes such as potassium to assist with rehydration
    • Has high-quality protein that helps build lean muscle when combined with exercise
    • Each eight-ounce serving of milk (plain or flavored) provides 300 mg of calcium.

Fluids

  • Good sources: WATER, milk, juice, sports drinks
  • Good for you because:
    • Fluid is lost during exercise so it is important to replenish after sweating.
    • Dehydration will decrease performance abilities and can be very dangerous.
  • When to consume:
    • Before during and after exercise, don’t wait until you feel thirsty
    • Don’t drink TOO much while exercising or it may be harder to run.

Note:

  • Sports drinks are no better for you than water unless you are exercising intensely for more than 60-90 minutes or in really hot weather.
  • If you choose to drink a sports drink consume 8-12 oz rather than the 16-20oz that usually comes in the bottle, this is too much.
  • Avoid carbonated beverages before/during exercise because they may cause an upset stomach.

Right Foods Can Improve your Moves

  • Don’t let hunger attack ruin the way you feel. Make you’re after school snack a pre-game meal! Reach for a morsel that’ll do the trick, one not too filling, but on that will stick. Reject sticky, sweet and greasy foods.
  • Carbohydrates will carry you through!
    Have you heard it is best to eat 2 to 3 hours or more before a meet or game? You may say this sounds impossible because you eat lunch between 11:00-12:00 noon, get out of classes at 2: 05pm and then have to play at 5:00pm. Some athletes prefer not to eat before a game; others need a snack to pick them up. Your best choices are high carbohydrates, low fat snacks. They provide quick energy and are easy to digest.

Smart and Simple Snacks

Pre-Activity

  • Goal is to prevent you from feeling hungry before or during the workout/competition as well as to maintain optimal blood sugar levels. Should consume carbohydrate foods, especially complex, sufficient fluids, moderate protein, low fat/fiber to decrease digestive stress
  • Try these snacks between school and practice or games… For that matter anytime.
    Develop the habit of eating to win.
    • Popcorn
    • Dry cereal
    • Cereal mixtures-party mix
    • Fresh fruit
    • Saltine crackers
    • Animal crackers
    • Vanilla wafers
    • Bagels
    • English muffins
    • Melba toast
    • Whole Wheat bread
    • Pita pocket
    • Graham crackers
    • Rice cakes
  • If you go home before a game or practice, or have access to a refrigerator or thermos, try some of these smart and simple pre-game snacks.
    • Sandwich with turkey, ham, roast beef, water packed tuna or chicken with lettuce, tomato and mustard
    • Vegetable sticks
    • Low fat yogurt dips or mixture of ricotta cheese and crushed pineapple
    • Cereal with skim, 1% or 2% milk
    • Mozzarella string cheese
    • Farmers cheese
    • Low fat cottage cheese
    • Yogurt shakes with flavored yogurt, fruit and skim milk
    • Cooked pasta with tomato sauce
    • Broth based soups-vegetable, noodle, or rice and meat combinations

Post-Activity

  • Post-workout snacks should be consumed within 30 minutes of ending activity and should contain carbs and protein. Examples:
    • Chocolate milk
    • Whole-grain crackers and cheese or peanut butter
    • Yogurt with fruit slices
    • String cheese and a piece of fruit
    • Milk in a frozen fruit smoothie
    • Pita chips dipped in hummus
  • It is best to eat/drink carbohydrates immediately after the exercise and then again during a meal within that 4 hour period.
  • Muscles are most receptive to rebuilding 2 to 4 hours following exhaustive exercise

Staff

Director

Melonie Bennett

Teachers/Nurses

Jean Afzali

Admin, Health

Jane Bagley

Hollis Elementary School
Health, Nurse, Nurse & Summer SPARK

Suzette Barrientos

East Middle School
Health, 1:1 CNA

Melonie Bennett

Braintree High School
Admin, PhysEd, Director, Health/PhysEd

Diane Bulman

Braintree High School
Health, Nurse

Brian Caffelle

East Middle School
PhysEd

Cheryl Campbell

Morrison Elementary School
Health, Nurse

Kara Carney

East Middle School
Health

Caitlinn Casey

Monatiquot Kindergarten Center, Hollis Elementary School
PhysEd

Margaret Ciulla

Integrated Perschool, PreK Center
Health, PK, Nurse

Brenna Coughlin

Braintree High School
Health, Nurse
School: 4031

Michael Denise

Braintree High School
PhysEd, Director, Athletics

Heather Driscoll

South Middle School, District
Health, Nurse, LTS Float Grant Nurse

Richard Ellis

Braintree High School
PhysEd, PhysEd, Adaptive & Coach

Elise Fontes

Liberty Elementary School, Hollis Elementary School
PhysEd

Matthew Freeman

South Middle School
PhysEd, MS & Soccer Coach

Karen Hubbard

Highlands Elementary School
Health, Nurse

Lisa Katilus

Hollis Elementary School
PhysEd

Joanne Kelly

Liberty Elementary School
Health, Nurse

Bernard Laferriere

Ross Elementary School
PhysEd

Rachel Laflash

South Middle School
PhysEd, & Field Hockey Coach

Eric Langenthal

Braintree High School
PhysEd

Christina Leader

East Middle School
PhysEd

Kevin Leahy

Flaherty Elementary School
PhysEd, PhysEd & Summer

Jennifer Mazzei

PreK Center
Health, 1:2 CNA

Fabienne Moleus

Flaherty Elementary School
Health, 1:1 CNA

William Nash

Highlands Elementary School
PhysEd

William O'Connell

Braintree High School
PhysEd, HS & Baseball Coach

Heidi Olson

Ross Elementary School
Health, Nurse, Nurse & Summer

MaryAnn O'Rourke

East Middle School
Health, Nurse, Nurse & SPARK

Ryan Puntiri

East Middle School
PhysEd

Maura Ranieri

Braintree High School
PhysEd

Karen Rapchuck

Morrison Elementary School
PhysEd, PhysEd & SPARK

Robert Ritz

Braintree High School
PhysEd, PE/Health Track Ast Coach

Kate Roedel

Braintree High School
Health, CNA

Judith Sellon

Flaherty Elementary School
Health, Nurse

Kaileen Spaulding

Braintree High School
PhysEd, PE & Health

Stephen Wilcox

South Middle School
PhysEd, Health Consumer Sc PE

Ellen Wright

South Middle School, East Middle School
Health, Nurse

Math

Math Word Collage


The core belief of the Braintree Mathematics Program is that all students, Pre-K to grade 12, can and will learn high quality mathematics. This is accomplished through a nurturing, caring learning environment that matches the students and the teacher’s strengths.

Braintree Public Schools have received state and national recognition for its students’ math successes.

  • Mass Insight noted Braintree for its MCAS achievement success at all levels in all schools.
  • UMASS Boston noted Braintree for its success at all levels in teaching math to special needs students.
  • A National Science Foundation study by Michigan State and the University of Pennsylvania examined Braintree’s math success.
  • East Middle School received a Governor’s Commendation for closing the math achievement gap with high risk students.
  • A New York Times article highlighted Braintree’s math successes.

The Braintree mathematics curriculum follows the most current Massachusetts Mathematics Curriculum Framework. http://www.doe.mass.edu/frameworks/current.html

The current Massachusetts Mathematics Curriculum follows the Common Core Mathematics standards. http://www.corestandards.org/Math/

Overviews of these standards are given below. Teachers are following these standards. They are developing math materials that match their students’ needs. No single textbook series aligns with these standards and with all students’ needs. For these reasons, the Braintree mathematics program does not officially sanction one particular textbook series. Teachers are given a variety of resources, pointed toward even more resources, and encouraged to create their own.

One great resource of math materials aligned to the Common Core is Engage New York. https://www.engageny.org/common-core-curriculum It is a totally free online textbook series, available to all, covering the math standards. Although not perfect, it gives interested parties a wealth of free, high quality math materials.

Standards for Mathematical Practice

  1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
  3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
  4. Model with mathematics.
  5. Use appropriate tools strategically.
  6. Attend to precision.
  7. Look for and make use of structure.
  8. Look for an express regularity in repeated reasoning.

The Massachusetts Mathematics Curriculum Framework and the Common Core Mathematics Standards are both based on teachers and students using the standards for Math Practice.

Math Overview

Overviews of the PK to grade 8 math curriculums and high school courses up to Algebra 2

Pre-K Overview

Pre- K Overview

Counting and Cardinality

  • Know number names and the counting sequence.
  • Count to tell the number of objects.
  • Compare numbers.

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

  • Understand addition as putting together and adding to, and understand subtraction as taking apart and taking from.

Measurement and Data

  • Describe and compare measurable attributes.
  • Classify objects and count the number of objects in each category.
  • Work with money.

Geometry

  • Identify and describe shapes (squares, circles, triangles, rectangles).
  •  Analyze, compare, create, and compose shapes.

Kindergarten Overview

Kindergarten Overview

Counting and Cardinality

  • Know number names and the count sequence.
  • Count to tell the number of objects.
  •  Compare numbers.

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

  • Understand addition as putting together and adding to, and understand subtraction as taking apart and taking from.

Number and Operations in Base Ten

  • Work with numbers 11–19 to gain foundations for place value.

Measurement and Data

  • Describe and compare measurable attributes.
  • Classify objects and count the number of objects in each category.

Geometry

  • Identify and describe shapes (squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, hexagons, cubes, cones, cylinders, and spheres).
  • Analyze, compare, create, and compose shapes.

Grade 1 Overview

Grade 1 Overview

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

  • Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.
  • Understand and apply properties of operations and the relationship between addition and subtraction.
  • Add and subtract within 20.
  • Work with addition and subtraction equations.

Number and Operations in Base Ten

  • Extend the counting sequence.
  • Understand place value.
  • Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract.

Measurement and Data

  • Measure lengths indirectly and by iterating length units.
  • Tell and write time.
  • Represent and interpret data.
  • Work with money.

Geometry

  • Reason with shapes and their attributes.

Grade 2 Overview

Grade 2 Overview

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

  • Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.
  • Add and subtract within 20.
  • Work with equal groups of objects to gain foundations for multiplication.

Number and Operations in Base Ten

  • Understand place value.
  • Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract.

Measurement and Data

  • Measure and estimate lengths in standard units.
  • Relate addition and subtraction to length.
  • Work with time and money.
  • Represent and interpret data.

Geometry

  • Reason with shapes and their attributes.

Grade 3 Overview

Grade 3 Overview

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

  • Represent and solve problems involving multiplication and division.
  • Understand properties of multiplication and the relationship between multiplication and division.
  • Multiply and divide within 100.
  • Solve problems involving the four operations, and identify and explain patterns in arithmetic.

Number and Operations in Base Ten

  • Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic.

Number and Operations—Fractions

  • Develop understanding of fractions as numbers.

Measurement and Data

  • Solve problems involving measurement and estimation of intervals of time, liquid volumes, and masses of objects.
  • Represent and interpret data.
  • Geometric measurement: understand concepts of area and relate area to multiplication and to addition.
  • Geometric measurement: recognize perimeter as an attribute of plane figures and distinguish between linear and area measures.

Geometry

  • Reason with shapes and their attributes.

Grade 4 Overview

Grade 4 Overview

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

  • Use the four operations with whole numbers to solve problems.
  • Gain familiarity with factors and multiples.
  • Generate and analyze patterns.

Number and Operations in Base Ten

  • Generalize place value understanding for multi-digit whole numbers.
  • Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic.

Number and Operations—Fractions

  • Extend understanding of fraction equivalence and ordering.
  • Build fractions from unit fractions by applying and extending previous understandings of operations on whole numbers.
  • Understand decimal notation for fractions, and compare decimal fractions.

Measurement and Data

  • Solve problems involving measurement and conversion of measurements from a larger unit to a smaller unit.
  • Represent and interpret data.
  • Geometric measurement: Understand concepts of angle and measure angles.

Geometry

  • Draw and identify lines and angles, and classify shapes by properties of their lines and angles.

Grade 5 Overview

Grade 5 Overview

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

  • Write and interpret numerical expressions.
  • Analyze patterns and relationships.

Number and Operations in Base Ten

  • Understand the place value system.
  • Perform operations with multi-digit whole numbers and with decimals to hundredths.

Number and Operations—Fractions

  • Use equivalent fractions as a strategy to add and subtract fractions.
  • Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division to multiply and divide fractions.

The Number System

  • Gain familiarity with concepts of positive and negative integers.

Measurement and Data

  • Convert like measurement units within a given measurement system.
  • Represent and interpret data.
  • Geometric measurement: Understand concepts of volume and relate volume to multiplication and to addition.

Geometry

  • Graph points on the coordinate plane to solve real-world and mathematical problems.
  • Classify two-dimensional figures into categories based on their properties.

Grade 6 Overview

Grade 6 Overview

Ratios and Proportional Relationships

  • Understand ratio concepts and use ratio reasoning to solve problems.

The Number System

  • Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division to divide fractions by fractions.
  • Compute fluently with multi-digit numbers and find common factors and multiples.
  • Apply and extend previous understandings of numbers to the system of rational numbers.

Expressions and Equations

  • Apply and extend previous understandings of arithmetic to algebraic expressions.
  • Reason about and solve one-variable equations and inequalities.
  • Represent and analyze quantitative relationships between dependent and independent variables.

Geometry

  • Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, surface area, and volume.

Statistics and Probability

  • Develop understanding of statistical variability.
  • Summarize and describe distributions.

Grade 7 Overview

Grade 7 Overview

Ratios and Proportional Relationships

  • Analyze proportional relationships and use them to solve real-world and mathematical problems.

The Number System

  • Apply and extend previous understandings of operations with fractions to add, subtract, multiply, and divide rational numbers.

Expressions and Equations

  •  Use properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions.
  • Solve real-life and mathematical problems using numerical and algebraic expressions and equations.

Geometry

  • Draw, construct and describe geometrical figures and describe the relationships between them.
  • Solve real-life and mathematical problems involving angle measure, area, surface area, and volume.

Statistics and Probability

  • Use random sampling to draw inferences about a population.
  • Draw informal comparative inferences about two populations.
  • Investigate chance processes and develop, use, and evaluate probability models.

Grade 8 Overview

Grade 8 Overview

The Number System

  • Know that there are numbers that are not rational, and approximate them by rational numbers.

Expressions and Equations

  • Work with radicals and integer exponents.
  • Understand the connections between proportional relationships, lines, and linear equations.
  • Analyze and solve linear equations and pairs of simultaneous linear equations.

Functions

  • Define, evaluate, and compare functions.
  • Use functions to model relationships between quantities.

Geometry

  • Understand congruence and similarity using physical models, transparencies, or geometry software.
  • Understand and apply the Pythagorean Theorem.
  • Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving volume of cylinders, cones and spheres.

Statistics and Probability

  • Investigate patterns of association in bivariate data.

Geometry Overview

Geometry Overview

Number and Quantity

Quantities

  • Reason quantitatively and use units to solve problems.

Geometry

Congruence

  • Experiment with transformations in the plane.
  • Understand congruence in terms of rigid motions.
  • Prove geometric theorems.
  • Make geometric constructions.

Similarity, Right Triangles, and Trigonometry

  • Understand similarity in terms of similarity in terms of similarity transformations.
  • Prove theorems involving similarity.
  • Define trigonometric ratios and solve problems involving right triangles.
  • Apply trigonometry to general triangles.

Circles

  • Understand and apply theorems about circles.
  • Find arc lengths and area of sectors of circles.

Expressing Geometric Properties with Equations

  • Translate between the geometric description and the equation for a conic section.
  • Use coordinates to prove simple geometric theorems algebraically.

Geometric Measurement and Dimension

  • Explain volume formulas and use them to solve problems.
  • Visualize relationships between two-dimensional and three-dimensional objects.

Modeling with Geometry

  • Apply geometric concepts in modeling situations.

Statistics and Probability

Conditional Probability and the Rules of Probability

  • Understand independence and conditional probability and use them to interpret data.
  • Use the rules of probability to compute probabilities of compound events in a uniform probability model.

Using Probability to Make Decisions

  • Use probability to evaluate outcomes of decisions.

Algebra 1 Overview

Algebra 1 Overview

Number and Quantity

The Real Number System

  • Extend the properties of exponents to rational exponents.
  • Use properties of rational and irrational numbers.

Quantities

  • Reason quantitatively and use units to solve problems.

Algebra

Seeing Structure in Expressions

  • Interpret the structure of expressions.
  • Write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems.

Arithmetic with Polynomials and Rational Expressions

  • Perform arithmetic operations on polynomials.

Creating Equations

  • Create equations that describe numbers or relationships.

Reasoning with Equations and Inequalities

  • Understand solving equations as a process of reasoning and explain the reasoning.
  • Solve equations and inequalities in one variable.
  • Solve systems of equations.
  • Represent and solve equations and inequalities graphically.

Functions

Interpreting Functions

  • Understand the concept of a function and use function notation.
  • Interpret functions that arise in applications in terms of the context.
  • Analyze functions using different representations.

Building Functions

  • Build a function that models a relationship between two quantities.
  • Build new functions from existing functions.

 Linear, Quadratic, and Exponential Models

  • Interpret expressions for functions in terms of the situation they model.

Statistics and Probability

Interpreting Categorical and Quantitative Data

  • Summarize, represent, and interpret data on a single count or measurement variable.
  • Summarize, represent, and interpret data on two categorical and quantitative variables.
  • Interpret linear models.

Algebra 2 Overview

Algebra 2 Overview

Number and Quantity

The Complex Number System

  • Perform arithmetic operations with complex numbers.
  • Use complex numbers in polynomial identities and equations.

Vector and Matrix Quantities

  • Represent and model with vector quantities.
  • Perform operations on matrices and use matrices in applications.

Algebra

Seeing Structure in Expressions

  • Interpret the structure of expressions.
  • Write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems.

Arithmetic with Polynomials and Rational Expressions

  • Perform arithmetic operations on polynomials.
  • Understand the relationship between zeros and factors of polynomials.
  • Use polynomial identities to solve problems.
  • Rewrite rational expressions.

Creating Equations

  • Create equations that describe numbers or relationships.

Reasoning with Equations and Inequalities

  • Understand solving equations as a process of reasoning and explain the reasoning.
  • Represent and solve equations and inequalities graphically.

Functions

Interpreting Functions

  • Interpret functions that arise in applications in terms of the context.
  • Analyze functions using different representations.

Building Functions

  • Build a function that models a relationship between two quantities.
  • Build new functions from existing functions.

Linear, Quadratic, and Exponential Models

  • Construct and compare linear, quadratic, and exponential models and solve problems.

Trigonometric Functions

  • Extend the domain of trigonometric functions using the unit circle.
  • Model periodic phenomena with trigonometric functions.
  • Prove and apply trigonometric identities.

Statistics and Probability

Interpreting Categorical and Quantitative Data

  • Summarize, represent and interpret data on a single count or measurement variable.

Making Inferences and Justifying Conclusions

  • Understand and evaluate random processes underlying statistical experiments.
  • Make inferences and justify conclusions from sample surveys, experiments and observational studies.

Using Probability to Make Decisions

  • Use probability to evaluate outcomes of decisions

BHS Overview of Mathematics Courses

Braintree High School Overview of Mathematics Courses

 BHS Math Courses 2015-2016

Overviews of all these courses are found in the BHS Program of Studies. These outlines follow the other details of the math program below.  

At Braintree High School all students, in all levels and in all programs, learn high quality Algebra 1 & 2, Geometry, and Statistics.

AP: The Braintree High Math Advanced Placement Program is as strong as or stronger than private schools’ programs. AP scores in Statistics, Computer Science, Calculus AB, and Calculus BC always result in a large number of students eligible for college credit.

SAT & ACT: Braintree High Math scores on the SAT and ACT scores are consistently above state and national averages. The most recent SAT scores were 15 points above the state average and 33 points above the national average.

MCAS: Braintree Schools have won awards of their Math MCAS scores. No student has ever been denied diploma because of MCAS testing. Extremely few students need a second attempt to pass the MCAS.

Math Classes

The average number of students in all BHS math classes for the current school year is 21.7 students.

Classes are taught so that all students can learn mathematics.

Math teachers use a wide variety of teaching methods.

Teachers utilize cooperative group work, lectures, research projects, writing assignments, research projects, and individualized mathematics programs.

Math Levels at BHS

The grade 9 math program at BHS meshes with the two middle school math clusters. Teachers from the high school visit East & South to observe and discuss the grade 8 to 9 transition with the middle school teachers. Middle school teachers visit BHS to see how their students do in the transition. While at BHS, students regularly move up or down levels.

Level 1: The 9th grade course is a full year of Geometry & Statistics. 10th grade level 1 is Algebra & Statistics. In 11th grade the students learn more advanced Algebra (Pre-Calculus) and can elect AP Statistics. In 12th grade, they prepare for the more difficult of the Advanced Placement Exams in Calculus: Calculus BC or they can opt for the Calculus AB course. They can also elect AP Statistics or Computer Science.

Level 2: The 9th grade course is a full year of Geometry & Statistics. 10th grade level 1 is Algebra & Statistics. In 11th grade the students learn more advanced Algebra (Pre-Calculus). In 12th grade, there are multiple choices. They can opt for the Calculus AB course, AP Statistics, Honors Statistics or Honors Calculus. Students move to Level 1 any year they are successful.

Level 3A: Level 3A students are those who earned C’s in grade 8 the proficient cluster in Algebra.  Level 3A follows the traditional college prep math sequence. Grade 9: Geometry & Statistics; Grade 10: Algebra & Statistics; Grade 11: Algebra 2; Grade 12: Pre-Calculus or Statistics/Intermediate Algebra 2. Students may move up to level 2 any time they are successful. 

Level 3B: Level 3B consists of students who received D’s and E’s in math in grade 8.  It is co-taught with the special needs department. Grade 9: Geometry & Statistics; Grade 10: Algebra & Statistics; Grade 11: Algebra 2; Grade 12: Continuation of Algebra 2.

Programs: The self-contained programs (ACES, ARCHERS, School to Work, the Alternative School, the PM School) also begin their math programs by concentrating on the topics covered in the Massachusetts Mathematics Framework. Upon passing the MCAS exam, students learn more Algebra to prepare them for college.

Answers to Commonly Asked Questions

  • Your level in math does not depend upon your level in any other subject. You can be in level 1 Math, level 2 English, and level 3 Science.
  • BHS level placement depends mostly upon the grades earned in grade 8. Outside test scores, such as MCAS, are also considered.

Further Questions? Contact the Director of Mathematics

Outline of BHS Math Courses (from the BHS Program of Studies)

All mathematics courses are college preparation courses. They do not, however, all include the same mathematics by senior year.  The short descriptions below describe the highest math each level includes.  The major difference in the way the levels are taught is the pace at which the mathematics is learned.  The major determination for level placement is the student’s performance in previous math courses and on external assessments.

Level 1 (Advanced Honors) – Moves at a very fast pace. Classes are mostly taught using a lecture approach with a few projects.  Students must have previously demonstrated superior mathematical performance.  AP Calculus AB or BC is essentially a grade 12 course.  Students have the option of taking AP Statistics or AP Computer Science in any year:  9, 10, 11, or 12 with the recommendation of their math teacher.  Both of these courses have heavy reading and writing components. 

Students enrolled in Advanced Placement courses are expected to take the Advanced Placement Examination for that course.  These courses are:  415 Advanced Placement Statistics; 416 Advanced Placement Computer Science; 413 Advanced Placement Calculus BC; 414 Advanced Placement Calculus AB. 

Level 2 (Honors) – Moves at a fast pace. Classes are mostly taught using a lecture approach with some projects.  Students must have previously demonstrated high mathematical performance.  Students who do very well in level 2 can move into level 1 junior or senior year.  Students who stay in level 2 will take non-AP Calculus in their senior year.

Level 3A (College Preparatory) - Moves at a normal, pre-college pace. Classes are taught using a blend of a lecture approach and projects.  Students must have previously demonstrated an average mathematical performance.  Students who do very well in level 3 can move into level 2 most year.  Students who stay in level 3 will take Pre- Calculus or Probability & Statistics in their senior year.

Level 3B (Fundamental College Preparatory) – Moves at slower pace. Classes are taught in small groups, and are often co-taught with teachers from the Special Education Department. This level is designed for students who have struggled with math previously. There are opportunities every year for level 3B math students to move into level 3A math classes.  Students who stay in Level 3B will take Continuation of Algebra 2 (437) or College Statistics/Intermediate Algebra 2 (438) their senior year.

NOTE:  All math courses require an approved graphing calculator.  Students seeking to enroll in a course, but who have not met the grade prerequisite, must get the approval of their current math teacher and the approval of the Director of Mathematics.

ADVANCED HONORS/ADVANCED PLACEMENT (Level 1)

ADVANCED HONORS GEOMETRY

SE 2 & 3

Level 1                                              410                                                     5 credits

Students will take a full year Geometry aligned to the Common Core standards.  The course will do an in-depth study of the field of Euclidean geometry with topics such as number and quantity, congruence, similarity, right triangles, and trigonometry, circles, expressing geometric properties with equations, geometric measurement and dimension, modeling with geometry, and statistics and probability.  This course has a required summer assignment reviewing Algebra I.

Prerequisite:  Students are placed in the course based on Grade 8 performance, teacher grades and external assessments.

ADVANCED HONORS ALGEBRA 1 & 2

SE 4a & 4b

Level 1                                              411                                                     5 credits

Students will take a full year Algebra 1 and 2 aligned to the Common Core standards.  The course will do an in-depth study of number and quantity, seeing structure in expressions, arithmetic with polynomials and rational expressions, creating equations, reasoning with equations and inequalities, functions, and statistics and probability.

Prerequisite:  Students enrolling in this course must have achieved a grade of at least a B- in Advanced Honors Geometry 410.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT STATISTICS

SE 2 & 3

Level 1                                              415                                                     5 credits

This course includes all topics included in the Advanced Placement course description for Statistics.  Topics focus on the four major pillars of Statistics:  Data Exploration, Data Collection, Probability, and Inference.  Topics include organizing data, processing data, the laws of probability, and inference testing.  Emphasis is on combining mathematical problem solving with written analysis of work.  This course has a required summer assignment.  Students will take the Advance Placement Exam in May

Prerequisite:  Students enrolling in this course must have achieved a grade of at least an A- in Advanced Grade 8 math or B+ in 410 Adv. Hon. Geom or B- in Advanced Honors Algebra 1 & 2 (411) or Advanced Honors Algebra 2/Pre-Calculus (412) or an A- in Honors Pre-Calculus (422).  This course is open to students in grade 9 & 10 based upon teacher recommendation.  This course also requires much more reading and writing than most math courses.  Students should be securing honors grades in Level 1 or 2 English. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT COMPUTER SCIENCE A

SE 2 & 3

Level 1                                              416                                                       5 credits

Advanced Placement Computer Science A is an introduction to computer science.  The course includes all topics included in the Advanced Placement course description for Computer Science A.  The course emphasizes object-oriented programming methodology with a concentration on problem solving and algorithm development and is meant to be the equivalent of a first-semester college-level course in computer science.  It also includes the study of data structures, design and abstraction.  Students will take the Advanced Placement exam in May.

Prerequisite:  Students enrolling in this course must have achieved a grade of at least an A- in Advanced Grade 8 math or B+ in 410 Adv Hon Geom or B- in Advanced Honors Algebra I & 2(411) or Advanced Honors Algebra 2/Pre-Calculus (412) or a A- in Honors Pre-Calculus (422).  This course is open to students in grade 9 & 10 based upon teacher recommendation.   This course also requires much more reading and writing than most math courses.  Students should be securing honors grades in level 1 or 2 English. 

ADVANCED HONORS ALGEBRA 2/PRE-CALCULUS

SE 1 & 5

Level 1                                              412                                                     5 credits

Students will learn Pre-Calculus as defined by the Massachusetts Mathematics Curriculum Framework. They will study the complex number system as well as vector and matrix quantities. They will become proficient with arithmetic with polynomials and rational expressions and interpreting functions. There is also a heavy component on trigonometric functions including applying trigonometry to general triangles.  Prerequisite:  Students enrolling in this course must have achieved a grade of B- or better in Advanced Honors Algebra 1 & 2 (411) OR an A- in Honors Algebra  1& 2 (421)

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS BC

SE 4c & 4d

Level 1                                              413                                                     5 credits

This course discusses all of the topics listed by the College Board in the AP Calculus BC course description, including a thorough investigation of derivatives and integrals as well as of infinite sequences and series.  Students enrolled in this course will be required to take the AP Calculus BC exam in May.  This course has a required summer assignment.

Prerequisite:  Students enrolling in this course must have achieved a grade of at least an A- in Advanced Honors Pre-Calculus (412).

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS AB

SE 4c & 4d

Level 1                                              414                                                     5 credits

This course discusses all of the topics listed by the College Board in the AP Calculus AB course description including a thorough investigation of limits, followed by the techniques and applications of derivatives and integrals.  Students enrolled in this course will be required to take the AP Calculus AB exam in May.  This course has a required summer assignment.

Prerequisite: Students enrolling in this course must have achieved a grade of at least a B- in Advanced Honors Pre-Calculus (412) OR at least an A in Honors Pre-Calculus (422).

HONORS (Level 2)

HONORS GEOMETRY

SE 2 & 3

Level 2                                              420                                                     5 credits

Students will take a full year Geometry aligned to the Common Core standards.  The course will cover the field of Euclidean geometry number and quantity, congruence, similarity, right triangles, and trigonometry, circles, expressing geometric properties with equations, geometric measurement and dimension, modeling with geometry, and statistics and probability.  This course has a required summer assignment reviewing Algebra I.

Pre-requisite:  Students are placed in the course based on Grade 8 performance, teacher grades and external assessments.

HONORS ALGEBRA 1 & 2

SE 4a & 4b

Level 2                                              421                                                     5 credits

Students will take a full year Algebra 1 & 2 aligned to the Common Core standards.  The course will cover the topics of number and quantity, seeing structure in expressions, arithmetic with polynomials and rational expressions, creating equations, reasoning with equations and inequalities, functions, and statistics and probability.

Pre-requisite:  Students enrolling in this course must have achieved a grade of at least a C- in Honors Geometry (420).

HONORS ALGEBRA 2/PRE-CALCULUS

SE 1 & 5

Level 2                                              422                                                     5 credits

This course begins with a completion of Algebra 2 topics as defined by the Massachusetts Mathematics Curriculum Framework. Students will lean the Pre-Calculus in the Massachusetts Mathematics Curriculum Framework. They will study the complex number system as well as vector and matrix quantities. They will become proficient with arithmetic with polynomials and rational expressions and interpreting functions. They will also study trigonometric functions including applying trigonometry to general triangles.  Prerequisite:  Students enrolling in this course must have achieved a grade of B- or better in Advanced Honors Algebra 1 & 2 (411) OR an A- in Honors Algebra  1& 2 (421)

Prerequisite: Students enrolling in this course must have achieved a grade of at least C- in Honors Algebra 1 & 2 (421) or an A- in College Algebra 2 (434)

HONORS CALCULUS

SE 4c & 4d

Level 2                                              423                                                     5 credits

Honors Calculus begins with a review of Pre-Calculus topics which include analysis of rational, algebraic, trigonometric, exponential functions and an investigation of limits.  This is then followed by an introduction to the study of differentiation and integration of those functions.  This course also introduces their application to related rates, optimization, area and volume of surfaces of revolution, differential equations and other topics.  This course has a required summer assignment.

Prerequisite: Students enrolling in this course must have achieved a C- or higher in Honors Pre-Calculus (422).  Students who have taken College Pre-Calculus (436) require teacher permission and should have grades of A- or higher.

HONORS STATISTICS

SE 4c & 4d

Level 2                                              424                                                     5 credits

This level 2 statistics course guides students through the four major components of an introductory college level course:  Examining Data, Producing Data, Anticipating patterns (i.e. Probability), and Statistics Inference.  Students will contribute to lectures and discussions, work independently in school and at home, collaborate in small groups, participate in activities, and engage in the use of technology.  Student resources include a primary textbook, supplemental handouts, use of the internet and a TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator.  Students are continually recalling and connecting past information to develop a complete understanding of the statistical approach to data collection and analysis.

Prerequisite:  Students enrolling in this course must have achieved a grade of at least a C- in Honors Algebra 2 (421) OR B+ in College Algebra 2 (434).  This course also requires much more reading and writing than most math courses.  Students should be securing honors grades in level 1 or 2 in English.

Honors Computer Science Principles

Level 2                                              426                                                     5 credits

This course is modeled on the AP course AP Computer Science Principles, which may be offered at BHS in 2016-2017. This course does not carry any AP credit in 2015-2016.The course introduces the central ideas of computer science as well as how computers are changing the world. Students develop computational artifacts while using simulations to explore central questions. The course involves analyzing data and communicating collaboratively about the findings.

Prerequisite Students enrolling in this class should meet level 1 or level 2 math and English (writing) prerequisites

Please Note: Honors Computer Science Principles 426 contains a broader scope of the computer sciences than AP Computer Science 416. Honors Computer Science Principles 426 also has a less technical yet still rigorous approach towards programming than AP Computer Science 416

COLLEGE PREPARATORY (Level 3A)

COLLEGE  GEOMETRY

SE 2 & 3

Level 3A                                           430                                                     5 credits

Students will take a full year Geometry aligned to the Common Core standards.  The course will do an in-depth study of the essential standards for the field of Euclidean Geometry, including number and quantity, congruence, similarity, right triangles, and trigonometry, circles, expressing geometric properties with equations, geometric measurement and dimension, modeling with geometry, and statistics and probability.

Pre-requisite:  Students are placed in the course based on Grade 8 performance, teacher grades and external assessments.

COLLEGE ALGEBRA 1 & 2

SE 4a & 4b

Level 3                                              432                                                     5 credits

This course is the study of Algebra 1 as outlined in the Massachusetts Mathematics Curriculum Framework. It begins with the real number system extended to exponents and irrationals. Students will then learn to interpret the structure of algebraic expressions, create equations, and reason with both equations and inequalities. The course will then examine the interpretation of functions and building functions (linear, quadratic and exponential). The course also has a statistics and probability component.

Prerequisite: Students enrolling in this course must have successfully completed College Geometry (430) OR teacher permission for a student in Algebra 1(431).

COLLEGE ALGEBRA 2

SE 1 & 5

Level 3                                              434                                                     5 credits

This is a review of Algebra 1 and continues through quadratics, functions and graphs, right-triangle trigonometry, and rational functions.  Word problems are included in the study of this course.  Formulas will be used in developing algebraic skills and in establishing applications of the algebraic method.

Prerequisite:  Students enrolling in this course must have passed a Geometry course and have a firm grasp of Algebra 1.  This can occur by passing College Geometry (432) and receiving a C- or better in College Algebra 1 (430)/Continuation of Algebra 1 (439).  Students who have taken Geometry (433) and Algebra 1 (431) require teacher permission.

COLLEGE PRE-CALCULUS

SE 4c & 4d

Level 3                                              436                                                     5 credits

This full year pre-calculus course begins with a review of topics from Algebra 2, including quadratic and cubic functions.  The course then examines the characteristics of rational, radical, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, with an emphasis on investigating their domain, range and intercepts.  This investigation will be enhanced by the use of a graphing calculator, which is required for this course.

Prerequisite:  Students enrolling in this course must have achieved at least a grade of C- in College Algebra 2 (434).

INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE MATHEMATICS

SE4c & 4d

Level 3                                              438                                                     5 credits

This is an online computer hybrid course. It has an online component as well as a classroom component.  The course is designed to prepare students for a rigorous math course in college.  The course includes:  trigonometry, limits, statistics, and financial decision making.

Pre-requisite:  Students enrolling in this course must have passed a Algebra II course.

FUNDAMENTAL COLLEGE PREPARATORY (Level 3B)

GEOMETRY

SE 2 & 3

Level 3B                                           431                                                     5 credits

Students in this course take a full year Geometry aligned to the Common Core standards.  The course covers the essential standards of the field of Euclidean geometry including number and quantity, congruence, similarity, right triangles, and trigonometry, circles, expressing geometric properties with equations, geometric measurement and dimension, modeling with geometry and statistics and probability.

Pre-requisites:  Students are placed in the course based on Grade 8 performance, teacher grades and external assessments.

ALGEBRA 1

SE 4a & 4b

Level 3                                              433                                                     5 credits

This course covers the essential Algebra 1 standards in the Massachusetts Mathematics Curriculum Framework. It begins with the real number system extended to exponents and irrationals. Students will then learn to interpret the structure of algebraic expressions, create equations, and reason with both equations and inequalities. The course will then examine the interpretation of functions and building functions (linear, quadratic and exponential). The course also has a statistics and probability component.

Prerequisite: Students enrolling in this course must have passed Geometry (431)

ALGEBRA 2

SE 1 & 5

Level 3                                              435                                                     5 credits

This course begins as a review of Algebra I and continues through quadratic and rational functions.  Focus is placed on being able to describe the different characteristics of functions (such as intercepts, domain, and range) using both an algebraic and geometric approach.

Prerequisite:  Students enrolling in this course must have passed Geometry (433) OR have a D+ or lower in Continuation of Algebra 1 (439).

Applications of Algebra

SE 4c & 4d

Level 3                                     437                                          5 credits

This course takes concepts from Algebra 1 and Algebra 2, including linear regression, piecewise and exponential functions, exponential growth and decay, and statistical analysis, and applies them to real-world problems that students can connect to, such as paying taxes, buying a car, securing a line of credit, and modeling a business.

Prerequisite:  Students enrolling in this course must have passed Algebra 2 (435) OR have a D+ or lower in College Algebra 2.

ELECTIVES-SEMESTER LONG

MATH STRATEGIES (MCAS Preparation)

SE 4a & 4b

Unleveled                                       405                                            2 ½  credits

This semester course meets 3 days in every 7-day cycle.  This first semester course is a comprehensive review of Algebra I.  The second semester course is an examination of strategies needed to solve problems as well as the mathematics covered in the Massachusetts Mathematics Frameworks (Statistics, Probability, Algebra, Geometry, Ratios, and Discrete Math).  Students concerned about MCAS are encouraged to elect this course.

This course is required for several groups of students unless they are taking two full year math courses.

1. All tenth grade students who received a grade of 230 or below on their eighth grade MCAS examination.  Other students may enroll as an elective.

2. All math level 3 and 4 sophomores who have no grade 8 MCAS Math scores in their school records.

3. All math level 3 and 4 juniors who transfer into Braintree High School. These students may transfer out of the course if their sophomore MCAS score in math is passing.

4. All juniors and seniors who have not yet passed the MCAS Math Exam.

MATH TUT0R

SE 4c & 4d

464                                                     3 credits

To be considered for this course, students must have completed Algebra I and II as well as Geometry.  They also must have the recommendation of their current math teacher.  Prospective students will be interviewed by the Director of Mathematics.  Those candidates who are qualified will be assigned to tutor students in math during the school day in classes and studies.

SAT LAB

(SAT Preparation)                        132                                                     1 credit

All Grade 11 students who take the PSAT in October will be assigned to this once-per-cycle course which meets in the computer lab.  Students will have access to individualized SAT preparatory instruction in critical reading, writing, and mathematics via online resources from the College Board. This course is co-listed with English; meeting once in the cycle satisfies responsibilities in both departments.  (Semester Two)

Math Fact Fluency Practice, K-5

Learn To Count Link
Thumble Dots
Gingerbread Math Game Link
Connect The Dots Link
Cross The Swamp Link
Greenelle's Numbers Link
Marble Math Link
Ten Frame Link

Ten Frame

Money Bingo Link
Lucky Drops Link
Number Series Link
Math Playground Link

Top Mark Link

Top Marks Link 2
Top Marks Link 3
Top Marks Link 4
Mission Addition Link
Mission Subtraction Link
Mission Multiplication Link
Mission Division Link
Rock Hopper Link
Multiplication Facts Link
Magic Squares Link
Break Apart Link

Teacher's Favorite Websites, Math K-5

Fact Fluency Practice & Application

  • Math Magician
    http://www.oswego.org/ocsdweb/games/mathmagician/cathymath.html
  • Xtramath
    www.xtramath.org
  • Aplus Math
    www.aplusmath.com
  • Fun 4 the Brain
    www.fun4thebrain.com
  • Multplication.com
    www.multiplication.com
  • Sum Dog
    http://www.sumdog.com/
  • Thinking Blocks: Addition & Subtraction
    http://www.thinkingblocks.com/ThinkingBlocks_AS/TB_AS_Main.html
  • Thinking Blocks: Multiplication & Division
    http://www.thinkingblocks.com/ThinkingBlocks_MD/TB_MD_Main.html

General Math

  • Math Playground
    www.mathplayground.com
  • Cool Math
    www.coolmath-games.com
  • That Quiz
    www.thatquiz.org
  • IXL
    www.ixl.com/math/
  • ICT Games
    www.ictgames.com
  • AAA Math
    www.321know.com
  • Math Play
    www.math-play.com
  • Dream Box
    www.dreambox.com/teachertools
  • Greg Tang Math
    http://gregtangmath.com/games
  • Turtle Diary
    www.turtlediary.com/math-games.html
  • Math Videos 4 Kids
    www.mathvids4kids.com
  • Arcademics
    www.arcademics.com
  • PBS Kids
    http://pbskids.org/cyberchase/math-games/
  • Sheppard Software
    http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/math.htm
  • NCTM illuminations
    https://illuminations.nctm.org/Default.aspx
  • Oswego
    http://resources.oswego.org/games/

Printable listing:  Teachers' Favorite Websites, Math K-5

Staff

Director

Courtney Miller

Teachers

Megan Aborn

Morrison Elementary School

Lauren Barrett

South Middle School, 8th Grade Team

Kelsey Bell

South Middle School

Joseph Belmosto

Braintree High School

Edward Boynton

South Middle School, Navigators Team, 8th Grade Team, Shutter Shades Team

Dorothy Burkett

South Middle School, Discovery Team, AustraliaTeam

Marta Caldwell

East Middle School

Christine Carney

South Middle School, Discovery Team

Kevin Clark

Braintree High School

Marilyn Connell

Hollis Elementary School

Raymond Cooper

Braintree High School

Tristyn Eckler

Braintree High School

Heather Feener

Braintree High School

Rebecca Freeman

South Middle School, Navigators Team

Stacey Fuller

East Middle School

Christopher Groleau

Braintree High School

Charlotte Halloran

Braintree High School

Madeline Jacob

Braintree High School

Erin Joyce

East Middle School

Nicole Joyce

South Middle School, AustraliaTeam

Katelyn Laubi

Braintree High School

Christina LeVangie

East Middle School

Heather Machado

Ross Elementary School

Kelly Macko

Braintree High School

Dagmar Mauro

East Middle School

Meredith McDonnell

Morrison Elementary School

Marina McGourty

East Middle School

Robert McKinnies

Braintree High School

Courtney Miller

Braintree High School

Danielle Molinari

Flaherty Elementary School

Melissa Morett

East Middle School

Christine Mulkerrins

Braintree High School

Dorothea Nelson

Braintree High School

Kathleen Norton

South Middle School, Shutter Shades Team

Katherine Pugsley

East Middle School

Lisa Rowan

Morrison Elementary School

Korleen Sheridan

East Middle School

Carol Skill

Braintree High School

Lauren Squires

Braintree High School
School: 7305

Sandra Stonebraker

Braintree High School

Brent Sturtevant

South Middle School, 8th Grade Team

Tara Trifiletti

Highlands Elementary School

Kristen Walsh

East Middle School

Jason Williams

Braintree High School

Katherine Wood

Braintree High School

Music

Elementary Music Objectives:

students singing

Music is essential to the education of all children. Music is an integral component

of the lifelong learning process by which individuals develop as members of society. The ability to perform, create, and listen to music with understanding is desirable for every member of society.

Music is an art. Through music students are able to build personal and cultural identity. It is a field of study with its own body of knowledge, skills, and ways of thinking. It provides a means of expression. Involvement in musical experiences fosters sensory perception and cognitive development, enhances self-worth, and encourages artistic discipline. Music transcends historical, cultural and language barriers while providing a means for understanding and communicating.

The Braintree Public Schools Music Department program is sequential and interdisciplinary. It integrates and adds depth and breadth to learning. It provides opportunities for students to express themselves, to think through music, and become self-aware. Music is basic to the education of every child. It improves and enhances the quality of life for all students.

Kindergarten Music Objectives:The primary school years are a time of growth, wonder, and excitement, exploration and discovery. These years are crucial as the child develops a concept of music, gains fundamental skills, and acquires sensitivity to musical sounds and their beauty.

  • Experience and explore the singing and speaking voice by matching pith patterns. Discovering different vocal timbres, and managing appropriate dynamic control.
  • Express and understand a varied repertoire of music by singing, playing rhythm instruments, moving, and listening.
  • Create and compose simple musical responses by employing improvisational techniques.
  • Compare and discover relationships between music, the other arts, history and culture by discussing how music connects to the home, school, and community.

Grade One Music Objectives:The first grade music students broaden their artistic horizons by exploring the different components of music. These include the development of vocal range and production and interpretive movement. Also important is the introduction to music symbols (icons and simplified notation) to develop beginning music reading skills.

  • Experience and explore the singing and speaking voice by matching pitch patterns, discovering different vocal timbres, managing appropriate dynamic control, and recognizing and using proper head voice.
  • Express and understand a varied repertoire of music by singing alone and with others, playing rhythm instruments, moving, and listening.
  • Create and compose simple musical responses by employing improvisational techniques and musical notation.
  • Compare and discover relationships between music, the other arts, history and culture by discussing how music connects to the home, school, community, and other places and events where music occurs.

Grade Two Music Objectives:In second grade, the expansion of cognitive abilities continues. Students learn to read notation and use music vocabulary to reflect upon the music they sing and hear. Students recognize characteristics of musical style and genres.

  • Experience and explore the singing and speaking voice by matching pitch patterns, discovering different vocal timbres, managing appropriate dynamic control, and recognizing and using proper head voice.
  • Express and understand a varied repertoire of music including patriotic and folk literature by singing alone and with others, playing rhythm instruments, moving, and listening.
  • Create and compose simple musical forms (AB, ABA) and responses by employing improvisational techniques and musical notation.
  • Compare and discover relationships between music, the other arts, history and culture by discussing how music connects to the home, school, community, and other places and events where music occurs.

Grade Three Music Objectives:At the third grade level, it is appropriate to begin developing an understanding of lifelong participation in music. The students’ musical growth is nurtured and encouraged through the enhancement of their musical interests and abilities. Students learn to value and respect music by performing in concerts.

  • Sing independently using a clear head tone. Sing in harmony maintaining own part in two and three part canons. Sing and play melodic patterns, intervals, and ostinati to accompany songs or rhythm activities.
  • Express and understand a varied repertoire of music including patriotic and folk literature by singing alone and with others, playing rhythm instruments, moving, and listening.
  • Create and compose simple musical forms (AB, ABA) and responses by employing improvisational techniques and musical notation.
  • Perform simple songs on the soprano recorder using the notes B, A, and G.
  • Identify families of instruments and individual instruments visually and aurally.
  • Compare and discover relationships between music, the other arts, history and culture by discussing how music connects to the home, school, community, and other places and events where music occurs.

Grade Four Music Objectives:Students in grade four continue to understand and develop with greater accuracy, clarity, and facility many of the skills and values that are introduced in the earlier grades. In addition to comprehensive music classes, students in grade four may participate in instrumental group lessons that are offered in violin, viola, cello, flute, clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, and trombone classes. By expanding their musical involvement in this way, students are able to further develop their personal interest in music and pursue a higher level of musical growth.

  • Sing independently using a clear head tone. Sing in harmony maintaining own part in two and three part canons. Sing and play melodic patterns, intervals, and ostinati to accompany songs or rhythm activities.
  • Express and understand a varied repertoire of music including cultural and ethnical musical styles by singing alone and with others, playing rhythm instruments, moving, and listening.
  • Create and compose simple and complex musical forms (AB, ABA, AABA, Rondo, etc.) and responses by employing improvisational techniques and musical notation.
  • Identify families of instruments and individual instruments visually and aurally.
  • Compare and discover relationships between music, the other arts, history and culture by discussing how music connects to the home, school, community, and other places and events where music occurs.

Music Students Playing InstrumentsGrade Four Instrumental Music Objectives:In addition to comprehensive music classes, students in grade four may participate in instrumental group lessons that are offered in violin, viola, cello, flute, clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, and trombone classes. By expanding their musical involvement in this way, students are able to further develop their personal interest in music and pursue a higher level of musical growth. Emphasis will be placed on the need for individual discipline, home practice, and concert attendance. All instrumental students are encouraged to take private lessons in the Afterschool Conservatory Program.

  • Assemble their instruments independently.
  • Demonstrate proper posture and handling of instruments.
  • Play with a tone that is full, rich, and characteristic of the instrument.
  • Demonstrate accurate intonation.
  • Play accurate and precise rhythms and tempos.
  • Demonstrate proper basics of breathing and articulation.
  • Know the names of the lines and spaces within the clef or range of their instrument.
  • Practice instrument on a daily basis.
  • Perform one major scale appropriate to their instrument.
    • Flute – Bb
    • Clarinet – C
    • Saxophone – G
    • Trumpet – C
    • Trombone – Bb
    • Violin – D
    • Viola – D
    • Cello – D

Grade Five Music Objectives:By the completion of the elementary grades, students should be able to demonstrate an increased awareness of music as an important part of every day life, participate in music through singing and playing instruments, enjoy listening to different types of music, and discuss personal responses to art and music. Students have the opportunity to participate and perform in the instrumental and choral programs with other students in an ensemble setting.

  • Sing independently using a clear head tone. Sing in harmony maintaining own part in two and three part canons. Sing and play melodic patterns, intervals, and ostinati to accompany songs or rhythm activities.
  • Express and understand a varied repertoire of music including cultural and ethnical musical styles by singing alone and with others, playing rhythm instruments, moving, and listening.
  • Create and compose simple and complex musical forms (AB, ABA, AABA, Rondo, etc.) and responses by employing improvisational techniques and musical notation.
  • Identify families of instruments and individual instruments visually and aurally.
  • Discuss careers, lives, and stylistic characteristics of selected composers.
  • Compare and discover relationships between music, the other arts, history and culture by discussing how music connects to the home, school, community, and other places and events where music occurs.

Grade Five Instrumental Music Objectives:In addition to comprehensive music classes, students in grade four may participate in instrumental group lessons that are offered in violin, viola, cello, flute, clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, and trombone classes. By expanding their musical involvement in this way, students are able to further develop their personal interest in music and pursue a higher level of musical growth. Emphasis will be placed on the need for individual discipline, home practice, and concert attendance. All instrumental students are encouraged to take private lessons in the Afterschool Conservatory Program.

  • Assemble their instruments independently.
  • Demonstrate proper posture and handling of instruments.
  • Play with a tone that is full, rich, and characteristic of the instrument.
  • Play pitches and notes accurately.
  • Demonstrate accurate intonation.
  • Play accurate and precise rhythms and tempos.
  • Demonstrate proper basics of breathing and articulation.
  • Know the names of the lines and spaces within the clef or range of their instrument.
  • Master appropriate fingerings and positions applicable to their particular instrument.
  • Practice instrument on a daily basis.
  • Perform major scales appropriate to their instrument.
    • Flute – Bb, FSaxophone lying on sheet of music
    • Clarinet – C, G, F, Bb
    • Saxophone – G, F, C
    • Trumpet – C, Bb
    • Trombone – Bb, C
    • Violin – D, G
    • Viola – D, G
    • Cello – D, G

Staff

Director

Rachel Hallenbeck

Teachers

David Buckley

Braintree High School

Nicole Callum

Hollis Elementary School

Michael Coronella

South Middle School

Rachel Hallenbeck

Braintree High School

Lisa Herrmann

Highlands Elementary School

Chester Laskosky

East Middle School

Norwood Pearson-Waclawik

East Middle School

Zoran Rebrovic

Flaherty Elementary School

Matthew Sawtelle

South Middle School

Tiffany Smith

Morrison Elementary School

Cassandra Sulbaran

Morrison Elementary School, Braintree High School

Science

Science Word Collage

The science program in the Braintree Public Schools is built on the belief that science is for all students. From pre-K to grade 12, science experiences drawing upon students’ natural curiosity build a strong foundation in life, physical, and earth and space science, as well as in technology and engineering. In addition, students develop skill in the practices of science and engineering -- the ways through which we have come to know the workings of the natural world and have engineered solutions for our needs within it. Throughout these experiences, students are challenged to think analytically and creatively, preparing them for success in higher education and careers in a technological world.

Science instruction begins in preschool, where science is integrated into the larger curriculum. As is the case for all science instruction throughout the district, lesson content aligns with the Department of Education’s curriculum framework for science and technology/engineering. Science instruction continues through elementary school, where students learn some life, some earth and space, and some physical science each year. Elementary students also work to attain technology/engineering standards through both science and the computer/media curriculum. Instruction is hands-on and active, complemented with reading of engaging texts and frequent writing in science notebooks.

In middle school, students continue with integrated instruction that includes technology/engineering, life, earth and space, and physical sciences each year. An advanced cluster and a proficient cluster, help provide students with the right balance of challenge and support to meet their learning needs. The state literacy standards in science and technology/engineering are also an integral part of the middle school curriculum.

At Braintree High School students are required to study three years of science, and many students choose to study science for four years. A variety of courses at different levels match individual students' needs for time to master new concepts and skills. To earn a high school diploma, students must demonstrate competency in one science discipline by passing an MCAS exam, generally in biology or physics at the end of freshman year. Courses are rigorous, incorporating both the disciplinary core ideas and the science and engineering practices as they apply to science in our lives and as they prepare students for future study of science. Within the core curriculum, all students study biology, chemistry and physics. In addition, elective courses, such as anatomy and physiology, forensic science and astronomy/astrophyics, give students an opportunity to pursue more specific areas of interest. Finally, five Advanced Placement science courses are offered: AP Biology, AP Physics 1, AP Physics 2, AP Chemistry, and AP Environmental Science. Equivalent to college courses, these classes challenge students to work at higher levels and may allow them to earn college credit before they have finished high school.

Staff

Director

Betsey Clifford

Teachers

Gina Achin

South Middle School, 8th Grade Team

Tess Arikian-O'Connell

Braintree High School, Science BHS

Catherine Caracciolo

Braintree High School, Science BHS

Sarah Clark

South Middle School, 8th Grade Team

Betsey Clifford

Braintree High School, Science BHS

Daren Dembrow

Braintree High School, Science BHS

Peter Dimilla

Braintree High School, Science BHS

Truong Dinh

Braintree High School, Science BHS

Sandra Dziedzic

Braintree High School, Science BHS

Amy Ferguson

Braintree High School, Science BHS

Edward Fuller

Braintree High School, Science BHS

William Glover

East Middle School

Jared Griffin

East Middle School

Nadia Johnson

Braintree High School, Science BHS

Kira Jordan

Braintree High School, Science BHS

Janis Laiosa-Stevenson

East Middle School

Lea Lewis-Santos

East Middle School

Kristina Macauley

South Middle School, Navigators Team

Stephen Maher

East Middle School

Mary O'Donnell

East Middle School

Stephanie O'Dwyer

Braintree High School, Science BHS

Jessica Passeggio

Braintree High School, Science BHS

Ralph Perrotto

South Middle School, AustraliaTeam

Brittany Roeder

South Middle School, Discovery Team

Elizabeth Shalhoup

South Middle School, Shutter Shades Team

Susan Smith

Braintree High School, Science BHS

T Grace Steinley

Braintree High School, East Middle School, Science BHS

Svetlin Tassev

Braintree High School, Science BHS

Amy Thornton

Braintree High School, Science BHS

John Wood

Braintree High School, Science BHS

Social Studies

Social Studies Word CollageThomas Jefferson once said, “The nation that expects to be ignorant and free in a state of civilization expects what never has been and never will be.” Jefferson believed that learning and democracy went hand in hand. An effective democracy demands educated citizens who can make informed and wise decisions. Whether it is voting on a local issue or understanding the workings of government to protect your interests, social studies education is essential for us all. Social studies courses in the Braintree Public Schools teach a diverse range of content and skills, including historical perspective, problem solving, economic systems, geography, and understanding of cultures.

It is required for all students to successfully complete three years of social studies, including Grade 9 American Government (second semester) and Grade 11 U.S. history (year-long course). However, because of the varied range of elective courses that we offer, almost every senior is enrolled in semester-long courses that interest them. Over the years, over 1,440 students each semester, in a high school of 1,550, enrolled in courses ranging from Advanced Placement to Level 4, from history to the social sciences, all of which strive to meet the academic needs while appealing to student interests. Department members’ expertise and willingness to try new ideas make the number and range of superior courses possible.

History courses offered to freshmen, sophomores and juniors closely adhere to the Massachusetts History and Social Sciences Framework (2003) and Common Core State Standards in History and Social Studies. Freshmen study World History from the fall of Rome through the Enlightenment. Sophomores take Modern World and United States History. Juniors will take U.S. History while Level 1 students have a choice of AP U.S. History. Seniors are able to choose from many options, among them Contemporary Global Issues, Economics, History of Sports in the United States, Sociology, Psychology, as well as Advanced Placement offerings in European History, American Government and Politics, Human Geography, and Psychology.

If you have any questions please contact Dr. Gorman Lee, K-12 Director of Social Studies, at 781-848-4000 x7835 or e-mail him at GLee@braintreema.gov

Staff

Director

Gorman Lee

Teachers

Paul Bache

East Middle School

Lee Britton

Braintree High School, Social Studies BHS

Ryan Casey

South Middle School, Discovery Team

Lucas Dedeus

South Middle School, AustraliaTeam

Rebecca Drayer

South Middle School, Navigators Team

Rachel Egbert

Braintree High School, Social Studies BHS

Richard Flanagan

Braintree High School, Social Studies BHS

Kyle Fredericks

Braintree High School, Social Studies BHS

Matthew Freeman

Braintree High School, Social Studies BHS

Kathryn Gamache

East Middle School

Taylor Giardina

East Middle School

Mallory Haupert

Braintree High School, Social Studies BHS

Mark Henry

South Middle School, Shutter Shades Team

Rachel Herbert

East Middle School

Matthew Howe

Braintree High School, Social Studies BHS

James Joyce

South Middle School, 8th Grade Team

Toni Kanes

East Middle School
School: 3431

Philip Krall

Braintree High School, Social Studies BHS

Cynthia Lang

Braintree High School, Social Studies BHS

Gorman Lee

Braintree High School, Social Studies BHS

Kyle O'Brien

South Middle School, 8th Grade Team

Michael Pelletier

Braintree High School, Social Studies BHS

Colette Picard

Braintree High School, Social Studies BHS

Brittany Ritland

East Middle School

Zachary Ritland

Braintree High School, Social Studies BHS

Zachary Samuels

Braintree High School, Social Studies BHS

Michael Varone

East Middle School

Jamie Wiggin

Braintree High School, Social Studies BHS

Title I

What is Title I?

Title I provides financial assistance to districts and schools with high numbers or high percentages of children from low-income families to help ensure that all children meet challenging state academic standards. Federal funds are currently allocated through formulas that are based primarily on census poverty estimates and the cost of education in each state.  In Braintree, both Ross and Morrison Elementary Schools receive funds to support a school wide program with resources dedicated to support all students with assistance in reading and/or math.  Please contact John Riordan at Morrison or Frank McGourty at Ross if you have questions regarding Title I.

Schoolwide Program

The expanded supports in Title I significantly increase the opportunities for schools, districts, and states to raise the achievement of all students, but particularly those who are the intended beneficiaries of Title I. The flexibility to consolidate funds and programs allows schools to focus on improving the achievement of those who most need support. By allowing schools to integrate programs, strategies, and resources, Title I can become the catalyst for comprehensive reform of the entire instructional program the students in these schools receive.

Parent Involvement Policy

In Braintree, we believe that active involvement of parents in their child’s education is essential to success in school.  Strong home-school partnerships benefit children, parents, teachers and the entire community.

Our focus on parental involvement has two objectives:  We wish to help parents provide assistance to their children, and we also require the feedback and input of parents as we evaluate our current services and design future programs.  Title I endeavors to develop a dynamic relationship where we both assist and are assisted by the home.

We recognize our responsibility in forming and encouraging these close home/school partnerships.  Title I staff will provide clear and strong leadership in the development of opportunities for parent involvement.  This starts with the development and maintenance of strong communication between home and school.  We welcome and encourage parental feedback and we will demonstrate ways parents can help their children achieve high academic standards.  Finally, we will encourage parents to participate in the evaluation and decision-making associated with the Title I program.

In addition, under ESSA (Every Student Succeeds Act) there is a focus on building the capacity of districts to help ensure that all students have equitable access to high quality educational experiences.

What Parents/Guardians Will Do

  • Make sure my child attends school every day, except in the case of illness
  • Ask my child about school every day
  • Check my child’s homework assignment notebook every day
  • Remind my child that success in school is important
  • Stay informed about my child’s education by communicating frequently with school and teachers and reading all notices
  • Ask about ways you can help your child in school
  • Provide a quiet place and regular time for homework
  • Read to my child every day
  • Attend school and district meetings as much as possible

What Students Will Do

  • Always do my best work
  • Complete my homework and bring it back to school
  • Read 15 minutes each night
  • Ask for help when I need it
  • Make sure all notices are given to my parents or guardians every day

What The School Will Do

  • Provide a quality education to all students (This education is based upon the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks)
  • Provide additional help in math and language arts to ensure proficiency
  • Be aware of each child’s learning style
  • Provide educational experiences in which the students are active participants in their learning
  • Communicate frequently with home
  • Hold parent conferences
  • Provide progress reports

Title I Teachers:

Morrison School:  Amy Carnicelli, Jenna Conlon, Mary Ridge

Ross School:  Rahila Mitchell, Janice Molloy


Please

  1. Print this handout about the Title I prgram
  2. Complete the information on the bottom of the document (as shown below)
     

    Student Name:
    Student Signature:
    Parent/Guardian Name:
    Parent/Guardian Signature:
    Parent/Guardian Telephone:
    Parent/Guardian Email:

  3. Return to your Homeroom Teacher within 5 days.

Thank you!


 

World Language

World Language Word Collage

The Department of World Languages offers courses in French and Spanish beginning in 7th grade through Advanced Placement. All courses are aligned with the Massachusetts Frameworks in Foreign Language Study and develop proficiency in Communication, Cultures, Comparisons, Connections, and Communities.

The first year of study is an introduction to the four competencies: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are taught correct pronunciation, rhythm, intonation and the vocabulary necessary for communication in everyday circumstances. This year is completed through 7th and 8th grades or one year at the high school. Students develop awareness of the culture and civilization in all countries that speak the target language.

The second year of study continues immersion in the target language as students move beyond the basics and acquire greater proficiency in the four language competencies.

The third year of study enables students to engage more freely in conversation on a wider range of topics and to understand the spoken language in a greater variety of contexts. Readings on topics related to culture and society, and literature are introduced at the different levels.

During their fourth year of study, students who plan to take the Advanced Placement Exam enroll French & Spanish Word Graphicin advanced honors level language courses. Honors courses are available to those who wish to maintain and deepen their language skills without the rigorous requirements of the AP level.

The fifth year of study emphasizes improvement of conversational skills and learning about contemporary life in French- and Spanish-speaking countries. Those in Advanced Placement study for the AP exam through their continued development of the four competencies and a comparison of six themes that span English-speaking and French- or Spanish speaking cultures. The themes include Global Challenges, Science & Technology, Contemporary Life, Families & Communities, Beauty & Aesthetics, and Personal & Public Identities.

Staff

Director

Gail Ward

Teachers

Kathleen Butler

East Middle School

Hillary Carpinella

Braintree High School

Maria Cortez

South Middle School, Navigators Team, 8th Grade Team, Shutter Shades Team

Rosanne Fitopoulos

East Middle School

Mercedes Gutierrez Garcia

Braintree High School

Jacqueline Halpin Curran

East Middle School

Melissa Heller

Braintree High School

Kathryn Holt

South Middle School, Navigators Team, 8th Grade Team, Shutter Shades Team

Anny Jameson

Braintree High School

Kevin Jameson

Braintree High School

Jeanine McKinnies

Braintree High School

Meghan Murphy

Braintree High School

James Nichols

Braintree High School

Jessica Noone

Braintree High School

Abigail Nunez

Braintree High School

Micaela Palermo

South Middle School, 8th Grade Team

Sally Spear

Braintree High School

Gail Ward

Braintree High School

Cristina Young

Braintree High School