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Academics

Program of Studies

Braintree High School

2018-2019

Introduction

Interim Headmaster

Andrew R. Delery

Housemasters

  1. Michael E. Larkin
  2. Nancy E. Moynihan
  3. Matthew J. Riordan

Braintree School Committee

  • Lisa Fiske Heger, Chairman
  • Cyril Chafe
  • Thomas Devin
  • George Kokoros
  • Kate Naughton
  • Jennifer Aborn Dolan
  • Joseph C. Sullivan, Mayor

Braintree High School
128 Town Street
Braintree, Massachusetts 02184
Telephone: 781-848-4000

To Parents and Students:

On behalf of the faculty, staff, guidance department and administration, we have provided parents and students with this comprehensive description of course offerings and services that are available to you at Braintree High School.

It is important that students and parents discuss the course descriptions, prerequisites and appropriate levels of expectations for each curriculum area. Selecting courses that challenge students academically and that pique their interest in learning is embedded in our school’s Mission Statement. We believe that our Program of Studies provides and promotes educational excellence for all students.

We encourage parents and students to contact the Guidance Office if you have any questions pertaining to the course selection process.

Best wishes for continued success.

Andrew Delery
Interim Headmaster 17-18

Mission Statement & Expectations

Mission Statement

PRIDE is the hallmark of Braintree High School. We recognize our responsibility in addressing the learning needs of all students by providing a variety of instructional techniques in a curriculum that meets state and national standards. We believe that a positive school climate requires a sense of partnership among students, parents, educators, support staff and community members. We foster educational excellence and encourage the recognition of and respect for diversity. We are committed to promoting scholarship, personal responsibility, co-curricular involvement, effective communication skills and critical thinking so that our students continue to be lifelong learners and civic-minded citizens.

The essence of our mission statement can be found in the acronym PRIDE:

Partnership

Respect and Responsibility

Involvement

Diversity

Educational Excellence

School-Wide Expectations

Students at Braintree High School will:

    1. Be prepared and ready to learn
    2. Think critically
    3. Solve real-world problems
    4. Communicate effectively
      1. Read effectively
      2. Write effectively
      3. Speak effectively
      4. Listen effectively
    5. Develop self-discipline, self-respect, and self-reliance

In each course at Braintree High School, students demonstrate their attainment of two of the school-wide expectations. The numbers underneath each course title refer to the chart above and designate the school-wide expectations assessed in the course.

General Information

Braintree High School is organized on a house plan. Each student will be assigned to the same housemaster, counselor, and homeroom teacher for his or her high school years. Through the house plan, each student will be able to seek assistance in educational, vocational or personal matters.

Braintree High School provides instruction, curriculum, extracurricular activities and counseling in an effort to help each student realize and develop his or her individual capabilities. In this process, the faculty strives to provide leadership, guidance, help, and inspiration. Good communication between the home and the school is essential in the educational process. Parents are encouraged to contact the school to discuss the student's program and progress.

Guidance Department

Counseling services are available to all students and parents to help in educational, vocational and personal decisions, as well as social and emotional support. Each high school student is assigned to the same counselor for four years. Personal conferences, along with small group meetings, are scheduled yearly with each student to discuss student interests, abilities, course selections, educational and vocational opportunities, and personal or social concerns.

A student should feel free to talk with his or her counselor at any time. Parents are also urged to consult with their child's counselor. The counseling department provides informational services and material for students and parents. Additional aids are available in the Career Center. Individual conferences may be scheduled with a student and his or her parents to develop specific plans for the future.

College and employment representatives are scheduled to visit Braintree High School throughout the year to speak with students. The counseling department tries to assist each student in every way possible throughout their high school years.

School Nursing Services

School nursing services complement and support the school’s academic mission while promoting and improving student’s health. Nursing services are available to ensure attendance of all students, including those students with chronic health conditions and complex care needs. The school nurse provides respectful, evidence based, coordinated health care that is responsive to individual student needs and values, social emotional support, and health education for all students to be healthy, safe, and ready to learn.

Accreditation

Braintree High School is accredited by the New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools.

Braintree High School was elected to permanent membership in the College Entrance Examination Board on October 26, 1982 and to membership in the College Scholarship Service in 1987.

Homework Policy

Homework is an integral part of the curriculum. Daily assignments will reinforce skills and concepts conveyed in school and/or provide the basis for the following day's school work.

Homework is given as an outgrowth of class work and in keeping with the curriculum course of the student. An average of 30 to 45 minutes per night per course will be the guide. Homework can count 5%-15% of the overall term grade.

Reports to Parents

Report cards are issued four times a year. Paper Progress Reports are no longer issued at Braintree High School. Parents may access their child’s current term average (mid-term progress report) through the Parent or Student Portal during the window dates. If a parent does not have access to the Parent or Student Portal, he or she may contact their child’s House Office and request a paper copy of the student’s current term averages. It is a policy of the school to try to keep parents informed and to encourage parents to take the initiative to keep in touch with the school. Telephone conferences will be arranged if it is difficult for a parent to come to school. Every student has a guidance counselor who welcomes the opportunity to assist parents and students. The telephone number is 781-848-4000.

Extra Help and Make Up for Absence

The student is responsible for making up any work missed or incomplete due to absence or other reasons. Each teacher has make-up classes until 2:50 p.m., one day a week and is available by appointment at other times. Students who are absent or tardy without good reasons will be asked to make up the time after school. Weekly progress reports are another voluntary form of help.

Braintree Public Schools Nondiscrimination Policy

The Braintree Public Schools does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, national origin, sexual orientation or disability in admission to its programs, services or activities, in access to them, in treatment of individuals, in its hiring or employment practices or in any aspect of its operations.

Graduation Requirements

I.Minimum Credits Necessary to Earn a Diploma:

Department

Credits

English

20 credits or passing the equivalent of 4 year-long courses

Mathematics

20 credits, including the completion of Algebra II

Science

15 credits or passing the equivalent of 3 year-long lab-based courses.

Social Studies

15 credits or passing the equivalent of 3 year-long courses, Must include successful completion of World History, US History and US Government

World Languages

10 credits or passing the equivalent of 2 year-long courses in the same language

Creative/Appl. Arts

5 credits or passing the equivalent of 1 year-long course

Physical Education

8 credits or passing the equivalent of 4 year-long Physical Education courses, (PE courses meet 2 days per cycle)

Electives

22 additional credits through the selection of electives



The Massachusetts Education Reform Law of 1993, G.L. c. 69, § 1D, requires that all students who are seeking to earn a high school diploma, including students educated at public expense in educational collaborative and approved and unapproved private special education schools within and outside the state, must meet the Competency Determination (CD) standard, in addition to meeting all local graduation requirements.

Competency Determination Graduation Requirement

Students must either earn a scaled score of at least 240 on the Grade 10 MCAS ELA and Mathematics tests, or earn a scaled score between 220 and 238 on these tests and fulfill the requirements of an Educational Proficiency Plan (EPP).

Students must also earn a scaled score of at least 220 on one of the high school MCAS Science and Technology/Engineering (STE) tests: Biology, Chemistry, Introductory Physics, or Technology/Engineering.

**Students planning higher education are urged to study the chart on page 6 of the Program of Studies to see the minimum number of years and/or courses recommended in each discipline.

  1. All students must carry a minimum of five major courses each semester plus Physical Education. A major course is defined as a course that meets six times or more per cycle. In addition, freshmen will also be scheduled to take Health Education.
  1. Minimum amount of credits that must be earned for a Braintree High School diploma is: 115

  1. Promotion Requirements

In order to be promoted to the respective grades, students must earn a minimum of the credits listed below:

    • Sophomore 25
    • Junior 55
    • Senior 85

Mark Weighting System – Class Rank

The high school uses a mark-weighting system recommended by the National Association of Secondary Principals. Mark-weighting is used to determine students' rank in class. Beginning with the graduating class of 2018, BHS has implemented a new mark-weighting system.

Weighted GPA is calculated as follows: Take the value assigned for each earned grade and corresponding level in academic classes (see chart below for values). Multiply that value by the credits earned in each class. Add the total for all classes then divide by the total credits earned. This is your weighted GPA.

Example:

Course

Level

Grade

Grade Value

Credits

Weighted Points

English 9

2

B+

3.7

5

18.5

World History

1

B-

3.3

5

16.5

Biology

2

C+

2.7

5

13.5

Geometry

2

B

3.3

5

16.5

Spanish

2

A-

4.0

5

20.0

Art

Unleveled

A

NA

(2.5)

NA

Total

25

85

Weighted GPA: 85/25=3.4

Mark Weightint System

Classes 2018 and Beyond

Grade

1AP

1

2

3

4

A

5.0

4.7

4.3

4.0

3.7

A-

4.7

4.3

4.0

3.7

3.3

B+

4.3

4.0

3.7

3.3

3.0

B

4.0

3.7

3.3

3.0

2.7

B-

3.7

3.3

3.0

2.7

2.3

C+

3.3

3.0

2.7

2.3

2.0

C

3.0

2.7

2.3

2.0

1.7

C-

2.7

2.3

2.0

1.7

1.3

D+

2.3

2.0

1.7

1.3

1.0

D

2.0

1.7

1.3

1.0

0.7

D-

1.7

1.3

1.0

0.7

0.4


Honor Roll

Braintree High School students earn Honor Roll status each term by attaining excellent grades in all courses, which meet every day.

The three honor roll categories are:

  • Maximum Honors: All A's and A-‘s in all subjects
  • High Honors: All A/A-'s with one B+/B/B-
  • Honors: All grades B- or better

Preparation for College and Advanced Schools

Most colleges give preference to the students who have earned at least sixteen academic units. In addition, students are encouraged to consider electing courses in the areas of Art, Business, Health and Wellness, and Music. It is imperative that students consult the college websites and their counselors for up-to-date information about admission requirements. Please consult the chart on page six of this booklet for more detailed recommendations. School achievement and rigor of courses, together with test scores, gives the best indication of college success. A high school diploma alone does not guarantee admittance to most colleges. The decision to admit a student rests with the college.

Braintree High School prepares pupils for admission to a broad range of colleges if (1) the proper choice of courses is made; (2) students maintain a sufficiently high level of achievement in their major subjects, and (3) qualifications of personal characteristics, personal interviews, and health standards are met successfully.

College Admissions

Most colleges require applicants to take standardized tests. The most commonly required examinations are the SAT and ACT (American College Testing). In addition, some very selective schools require applicants to take the SAT Subject Tests. Students should refer to the college websites and consult with their counselors to determine which examination they need to complete. The guidance department strongly urges college-bound students to take the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT) in October of their sophomore and junior years and the SAT and ACT in spring of their junior year, and fall of senior year.

Advanced Placement Program (AP)

The Advanced Placement Program, which the College Board has sponsored since 1955, offers able and ambitious secondary school students an opportunity to study one or more college-level courses and then, depending upon examination results, to receive advanced placement, credit, or both when they enter college. AP examinations take place during the first two weeks in May. Readers from schools and colleges then grade the examinations on a five-point scale: 5, extremely well qualified; 4, well qualified; 3, qualified; 2, possibly qualified; 1, no recommendation. Each candidate's grade report is sent in July to the college he/she will enter. It is then up to the college to decide whether and how it will recognize his/her work.

Braintree High School offers advanced placement in English, (Literature and Composition and Language and Composition), American History, European History, Human Geography, Psychology, Government and Politics, Physics (1 & 2), Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science, Calculus (AB and BC), Statistics, French, Spanish, Music Theory, Computer Science A, Computer Science Principles and Art Portfolio.


Extracurricular Activities

Eligibility

As reflected in our school’s Mission Statement, involvement in extra-curricular activities is an important component to a student’s overall educational experience. Throughout a student’s high school career, administrators, guidance counselors and teachers encourage students to experience learning through involvement in activities that will enhance their social, emotional and intellectual growth. Meeting new people and becoming an active participant in a club will provide rewarding experiences that will promote responsibility and service to the school and community. These activities are open to all students at Braintree High School.

All students involved in extracurricular activities must adhere to the same academic standards that student athletes must follow: all students must be passing at least 5 major courses and maintain an overall average of 70. The specific requirements are detailed in the Student/Parent Handbook.

The extracurricular activities are: Academic Decathlon, Art National Honor Society, Best Buddies, BHS News for Forum, Bible Study Club, Cultural Awareness Club, Debate Team, Environmental Club, French & Spanish National Honor Societies, Future Educators of America, Gay/Straight Alliance Club, History Club, Interact Club, Jazz Ensemble, Key Club, Stone Soup (literary magazine), Math Team, Mock Trial Team, National Honor Society, Peer Mediation Team, Photography Club, Robotics Team, SADD, Show Choir, String Quartet, Student Council, Theater Guild, Writer’s Workshop Club and Year Book.

The Student Council

The purpose of the student council is to develop attitudes and practices of good citizenship, to promote harmonious relations throughout the school, to create closer understanding and cooperation between the faculty and the student body, and to enable the student body to participate actively in the general welfare of the school and community. The requirements for election to the council are outlined in the Student/Parent Handbook.

Athletic Program 9-12

The athletic program is designed to provide an opportunity for large numbers of students to take part in either interscholastic or intramural athletics. The Athletic Programs help to promote school spirit, pride, competition and sportsmanship. They also teach students about self-discipline and team cooperation, build self-confidence and focus on the areas of physical fitness, recreation, and sportsmanship. Braintree High School is a member of the Bay State Conference and competes within this league in twenty sports. The following teams and levels of participation are offered:

Boys'

  • Baseball; varsity, J.V., freshman
  • Basketball; varsity, J.V., freshman
  • Cross Country: varsity
  • Football: varsity, J.V., freshman
  • Golf; varsity, J.V.
  • Gymnastics; varsity
  • Ice Hockey; varsity, J.V.
  • Indoor Track; varsity
  • Lacrosse; varsity, J.V.
  • Outdoor Track; varsity
  • Soccer; varsity, J.V. freshman
  • Tennis; varsity
  • Volleyball; varsity, J.V., freshman
  • Wrestling; varsity, J.V.

Girls'

  • Basketball; varsity, J.V., freshman
  • Cheerleading; varsity, J.V.
  • Cross Country; varsity
  • Dance Squad; varsity, J.V.
  • Field Hockey; varsity, J.V., freshman
  • Golf; varsity
  • Gymnastics; varsity
  • Ice Hockey; varsity, J.V.
  • Lacrosse; varsity, J.V.
  • Indoor Track; varsity
  • Outdoor Track; varsity
  • Soccer; varsity, J.V. freshman
  • Softball; varsity, J.V., freshman
  • Swimming; varsity
  • Tennis; varsity
  • Volleyball; varsity, J.V.

Both the federal government and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts have enacted legislation which prohibits sex discrimination in educational programs. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 specifically states:

“No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance…”

Important Information for Students Planning Higher Education

The chart which appears below is intended to guide students in making course selections appropriate to their goals. Students might not know exactly what career they want to follow, but they may have a general knowledge of their strengths and weaknesses and a feeling for the level of instruction in which, although they will be challenged, they can succeed.

In general, the more selective a school or college, the more competitive a student must be in terms of courses taken and grades earned. The schools to which students apply will decide whether to admit or not to admit on the basis of the school record in grades 9-11 and the first two terms of grade 12. School and community activities, work and summer experiences, scores on nationally standardized tests, rank in class and assessments of such things as writing and reading skills also are weighed by an admissions staff. Qualities such as consistency in daily work, maturity and ability to accept responsibility, as reflected in teacher evaluations and counselor recommendations, are carefully considered.

Students should consult their parents, teachers, counselors, and adults who are working in careers that are being considered. The Career Center should be utilized beginning in the sophomore year.


Minimum Number of Years of Study Strongly Recommended

Area of Study

Most Selective Colleges

Selective Colleges

Other 4 Year Colleges

2 Year Colleges and Technical Schools

English

4

4

4

4

World Language

4-5 of same language

4-5 of same language preferred, 3-2 acceptable

2-4

2

Mathematics

4

4

4

3

Science

4

4

3-4

3

physics required for some technical programs

Social Studies

4

4

3-4

3


Preparation For After High School

Each year over ninety percent of Braintree High graduates go on to further education, with approximately seventy-five to eighty percent entering four-year colleges.

There is no one set of courses required for admission, but students planning college should, each year, elect at least four courses chosen from among English, Social Studies, Mathematics, Science and World Language offerings. The best way to prepare for college is to take as broad and as challenging a schedule as one can manage.

Students should also involve themselves in two or three school or community activities, not because "it looks good on an application," but because they should learn more about themselves, self-discipline, learning to organize time, leading and working with others. In fact, participation in the school community is a valuable experience for all students in helping them to decide who they are and where they are going.

Choosing Specific Courses

Each year students will have the opportunity to meet individually with their counselor to help them elect courses consistent with their strengths, interests, career hopes, and educational plans. Students should consult their teachers and parents. Begin to use the Career Center even as a sophomore. Learn how to navigate a school or college website by junior year and find out what questions will be asked in an interview, whether it's for college or a job.

Choosing A Career

When faced with choosing a career direction, questions that should be considered include:

  1. What career fields match the student's interests and abilities?
  2. What fields are expected to offer good prospects for employment? What types of education and training are required to enter particular occupations?
  3. What courses should be selected in high school so that a career path can be followed?

The first step or decision that students make about selecting a career direction is to find out what they would like to do and what they can do. Every person has the essentials for success in many occupations.

Guidance counselors can help students find career fields that match their interests and abilities. The Career Center can also be utilized.

Career Options

To answer the question about the options open to students, there are a number of ways to get this information.

The Career Center has information about occupations, schools, educational programs, and financial assistance. Sophomores, juniors and seniors are encouraged to use the Naviance Program to access a wide variety of information

After discussion with the guidance counselor, getting ready to choose a career should be much easier.

Coordinators/Department Heads


Department

Coordinator / Dept. Head

Art

Heidi Hurley

Athletics

Michael Denise

English

Rock Roberts

English Language Education

Kellie Pendley

Guidance

Anthony Garofalo

Health and Wellness

Melonie Bennett

Mathematics, Business

Courtney Miller


Department

Coordinator / Dept. Head

Music

Rachel Hallenbeck

Nursing Services

Laurie Melchionda

Science

Dr. Betsey Clifford

Social Studies

Dr. Gorman Lee

Special Services

Jeffrey Rubin

Specialized Alternative Programs

Michael Bochman

World Language

Gail Ward


Levels of Instruction

At Braintree High School, levels exist to provide the opportunity for students to learn at a rate and in an environment best suited to them as individuals.

Level 1 (Advanced Honors) courses require regular independent reading and written assignments outside of class, including summer reading assignments. Students are expected to participate fully in class discussions, oral presentations, and debates. Independent research projects may also be assigned. For many Level 1 courses, students must have achieved a mark of C or better in their present Level 1 class or must have recommendation from current teacher and approval of the curriculum director. Please read Advanced Placement (AP) course descriptions for specific prerequisites.

Level 2 (Honors) courses require reading and written assignments outside of class, including summer reading assignments. Students are expected to participate fully in class activities including, but not limited to, class discussions, oral presentations and debates. Students must have achieved a mark of C or better in their present class or must have recommendation from current teacher and approval of the curriculum director.

Level 3 (College Preparatory) courses are designed for students with average verbal and written abilities. Students are expected to complete all reading and written assignments, keep and maintain a notebook, participate fully in class activities including, but not limited to, class discussions, oral presentations and debates. Students must have achieved a mark of passing or better in their present class, or must have recommendation from current teacher and approval of the curriculum director.

Level 4 courses are designed for students with a need for further development and support of written, oral and organizational skills. Students are expected to complete all reading and written assignments, keep and maintain a notebook, and participate fully in class activities including, but not limited to, class discussions, oral presentations and debates.

Level placements are reviewed each year by teachers and counselors to insure that the student is working at a level where he can experience both challenge and success. Parents should consult counselors and current teachers before approving any change in level.

In most sequential courses, such as mathematics and world languages, the student must earn a designated grade in order to elect the next year of the subject at the same level. Prerequisites are intended to guide parents and students in selecting appropriate courses and levels.

English

Graduation Requirements

Students must successfully complete four years of English classes and earn a passing score of 240 on the MCAS English & Language Arts examination, which is given in Grade 10. The student who does not earn a score of 240 can still attain graduation by completing the requirements of an Educational Proficiency Plan.

Grades 9-12 Required for Graduation

Students fulfill the English requirement with a full year English course. The level of the required course is based on the recommendation of the English teacher and the counselor and on meeting the prerequisite.

Students must pass English 9 before enrolling in English 10. Students must pass English 10 before enrolling in English courses for Grade 11, with one exception: a student who has met the graduation competency determination on the Grade 10 ELA MCAS may enroll in English 10 and a Grade 11 English course concurrently.

Students who scored below 230 on the Grade 7 or 8 MCAS test in English Language Arts should take ELA Strategies in Grade 10

Full Year Courses

Grade 9

SE 4a & 4b

  • Level 1, 110, 5 credits
  • Level 2, 120, 5 credits
  • Level 3, 130, 5 credits
  • Level 4, 140, 5 credits

Grade nine English emphasizes the richness of the Western tradition by exploring works reflecting our common literary and cultural heritage. Whenever possible, connections are made between the literature and other disciplines such as art, music, and social studies. Students will read classic works of literature from a variety of genres, such as The Odyssey and a Shakespearean play, as well as twentieth century works like To Kill a Mockingbird and Animal Farm. In addition to core literature, relevant non-fiction selections and poetry enhance major units. Significant work on writing and revising compositions, improving vocabulary and grammar, researching and documenting cited material, and presenting work orally are regular components of the course.

Grade 10

SE 2 & 3

  • Level 1, 111, 5 credits
  • Level 2, 121, 5 credits
  • Level 3, 131, 5 credits
  • Level 4, 142, 5 credits

The Grade ten English curriculum focuses primarily on American and British literature. Students read and analyze poems, short stories, essays, plays, and novels including The Great Gatsby, A Raisin in the Sun, and Lord of the Flies. As the required Shakespearean play for sophomores, students will read and analyze Macbeth. Additionally, students will gain proficiency in appropriate usage, oral and written skills, and the interpretation and evaluation of literature. A student’s Grade 10 course will prepare him or her for success on the English & Language Arts MCAS examination.

Grade 11

Writing and Literature, SE 4c & 4d

  • Level 2, 125, 5 credits
  • Level 3, 135, 5 credits
  • Level 4, 145, 5 credits

Writing and Literature is a year-long course in which students improve their writing and close critical reading skills. It emphasizes clear thinking, logical organization of ideas, and precise presentation as basic techniques of communicating. In this course, students examine and analyze essays, selected works of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. The nonfiction and poetry anthology Readings for Writers is a core text for all three levels. The course also includes major literary works from the western canon, a Shakespearean play, and preparation for the SAT exam.

Grade 12

Literature and Identity, SE

  • Level 2, 124, 5 credits
  • Level 3, 134, 5 credits

Who has the power to tell the story of a person, a people, a culture, an event? From books and plays, to periodicals and films, to advertising and social media, many of the texts we read shape our sense of ourselves, our lives, and the world around us. This course explores the link between literature and identity by examining the role literature plays in shaping, creating and/or devaluing identity. The notions of agency, perspective, subjectivity, audience and intent will be addressed as students explore a wide variety of literature that is read in the 21st century. Using a variety of critical lenses, students will look at identity by engaging in topics of gender, race, setting, class and justice from literature and media sources. Students will look at these topics and the formation of identity from the perspectives of both readers and writers.

Creative Writing and Literature, SE

  • Level 2, 126, 5 credits
  • Level 3, 136, 5 credits

In this class, students will foster their written voices as they conduct extensive studies of various writing forms and genres. Students will then write their own works following the guidelines of the genre. Writing forms will include short stories, poems, and memoirs. Schools of literary criticism will be taught and employed to analyze the structure, themes, and characterization within sample memoirs, short stories, and poems. The writing for this course is intensive. Through a process writing approach, students can expect to complete multiple writing assignments per week. Because this course implements a workshop model in which the class becomes a community of writers, students will be required to share their pieces with peers and engage in the exchange of constructive feedback.

Grade 10

English/Language Arts Strategies, SE 4a & 4b

  • (MCAS Preparation), 109, 1¼ credits

ELA Strategies is a small-group class designed to support sophomore students in meeting state expectations, including a proficient score on the ELA MCAS test, by providing individualized instruction in English language skills, reading skills, writing skills, and study skills, based on each student’s needs. Throughout the year, students will work on developing test-taking strategies for the MCAS exam. The course is open to sophomores upon recommendation of the teacher or guidance counselor. This course may be repeated for credit. This course runs on an as needed basis.

SAT Lab, SE 4a & 4b

  • (SAT Preparation), 132, 1 credit

All Grade 11 students who take the PSAT in October will be assigned to this once-per-cycle course which meets in the computer lab. Students will have access to individualized SAT preparatory instruction in critical reading, writing, and mathematics via online resources from the College Board. This course is co-listed with Mathematics; meeting once in the cycle satisfies responsibilities in both departments. (Semester Two)

Advanced Placement Courses

The Advanced Placement English courses are for juniors and seniors who wish to study English in greater depth. Students who elect one of these courses should be prepared to do the work expected of freshmen in college. Both courses include extensive reading assignments and weekly writing assignments. It is expected that students will take an Advanced Placement Examination in May. Students enrolled in Advanced Placement English will be expected to read a selection of literary works over the summer and complete corresponding written assignments by specified due dates. A student who plans to take Advanced Placement Language and Composition as a junior must have achieved a mark of B+ in Level 1 tenth grade English (or the equivalent) and must have the recommendations of his current teacher and the Director of English. A student who plans to take Advanced Placement Literature and Composition as a senior must have achieved a minimum of a C in AP Language and Composition. A student who has a minimum of a B+ in Honors Writing and Literature and the recommendations of his current teacher and the Director of English is also eligible for the class.

Advanced Placement Literature and Composition, SE 4c & 4d

  • Level 1, 113, 5 credits

This course involves students in both the study and practice of writing and the study of literature. Students intensively study representative works from several genres and periods. Works originally written in English are selected from the western literary canon. Through their careful reading of literary works, students sharpen their awareness of language and their understanding of the writer's craft. Class assignments focus heavily on discussion and collaboration to generate new or significant ideas about literature and authors’ techniques. Writing assignments focus on the critical analysis of literature. Summer reading and assignments are required and must be completed for admission to the course in September. Due to schedule changes, this course will not be available during the 2018-2019 school year.

Advanced Placement Language and Composition, SE 1 & 5

  • Level 1, 114, 5 credits

This course includes both the reading and analysis of varieties of prose and the study of the process of writing - from the discovery of the topic, to the preliminary drafts, to the final edited draft. Students study examples of prose from various fields and periods that serve as models of effective styles, and they write a variety of assignments using different styles. With study and practice, students gain an understanding of the principles of effective writing and become effective writers themselves. In addition, the class will focus on the development and structure of arguments in a variety of forms: essays, editorials, debates. Students will also participate in reading, discussion, and writing about a variety of current issues to further their analytical and argumentative skills. Summer reading and assignments are required and must be completed for admission to the course in September.


Elective Courses

These courses may be elected in addition to semester or full year courses.

Grades 9, 10, 11 & 12

Intro to Television and Video Production, SE 4c & 4d

  • 164, 2 ½ credits

This course serves as an introduction to the fast-paced world of television and media production for news information, education, entertainment, and industry. Students will learn successful techniques of video production and work both in front of the camera and behind the scenes.

Grades 10, 11, & 12

Broadcast Journalism 1, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 2, 165, 2 ½ credits

A continuation of Intro to Television & Video Production, this course provides an opportunity for students to explore both the elements of production and the legal and ethical aspects of mass media. Successful completion of Intro to Television & Video Production and the recommendation of the Intro teacher are prerequisites for enrollment in this course.

Broadcast Journalism 2, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 2, 166, 2 ½ credits

A continuation of Broadcast Journalism 1, this course provides an opportunity for students to develop more complex knowledge of production elements and independently produce programming. Successful completion of Broadcast Journalism 1 and the recommendation of the teacher are prerequisites for enrollment in this course.

Broadcast Journalism 3, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 2, 167, 2 ½ credits

A continuation of Broadcast Journalism 2, this course provides an opportunity for students to independently produce programming in longer formats. Successful completion of Broadcast Journalism 2 and the recommendation of the teacher are prerequisites for enrollment in this course.

Broadcast Journalism 4, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 2, 168, 2 ½ credits

A continuation of Broadcast Journalism 3, this course provides an opportunity for students to independently produce programming in longer formats. Successful completion of Broadcast Journalism 3 and the recommendation of the teacher are prerequisites for enrollment in this course.

Broadcast Journalism 5, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 2, 169, 2 ½ credits

A continuation of Broadcast Journalism 4, this course provides an opportunity for students to independently produce programming in longer formats. Successful completion of Broadcast Journalism 4 and the recommendation of the teacher are prerequisites for enrollment in this course.


Social Studies

The Social Studies Department offers a wide variety of courses, which prepare students for intelligent civic participation in a democratic society in the twenty-first century. The department offers a carefully selected sequenced curriculum that provides knowledge and skills in history and the social studies. Our social studies program is designed to meet the needs of all our students. The courses offered are leveled based on students demonstrating proficiency or mastery in skills and content knowledge as outlined in the Massachusetts History and Social Science Curriculum Framework and the Common Core State Standards in modes appropriate to the study of history and the social studies.

Students are required to successfully complete an equivalent of three years in the Social Studies including World History, U.S. History, and U.S. Government for graduation.

Grades 9, 10, 11

Full Year Courses

Grade 9 Required for Graduation

History of the Western World & U.S. Government, SE 4a & 4b

  • Level 1, 210, 5 credits
  • Level 2, 220, 5 credits
  • Level 3, 230, 5 credits
  • Level 4, 240, 5 credits

The successful completion of U.S. Government is required of all students for graduation.

In the fall, students will investigate and analyze historical world events that center on the universality of man from the Fall of Rome to the Enlightenment and revolutions. In the spring, students will study the American heritage of individual rights and responsibilities, the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights, and the roles, responsibilities, and functions of their government at the local, state, and national levels. Students will examine and analyze the systems of separation of powers and checks and balances as well as the fundamental principles of constitutional and representative democracy at every level of our government. Direct student involvement in political process is encouraged and considered an integral part of this course. Outside speakers will be invited to discuss various aspects of government with students. Students are expected to assess historical data by evaluating its relevance, importance, and reliability and to arrive at informed conclusions on the basis of factual evidence. As outlined in the Common Core State Standards students will read and write in modes appropriate to the study of history and government.

Grade 10 Required for Graduation

Modern World History, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 1, 211, 5 credits
  • Level 2, 221, 5 credits
  • Level 3, 231, 5 credits
  • Level 4, 241, 5 credits

Grade 10 students will begin the year by reviewing the Enlightenment, the first struggle for Empire, and the impact of the American Revolution in the larger context of World History. This will set the stage for the study of the rise of the nation state in Europe, the French Revolution, and the economic and political roots of the modern world. They will study the origins and consequences of the Industrial Revolution, 19th century political reform in Western Europe, and imperialism in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. They will explain the causes and consequences of the great military and economic events of the past century, including World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, and the Russian and Chinese revolutions. Finally, students will study the rise of nationalism and the continuing persistence of political, ethnic, and religious conflict in many parts of the world. This course will also examine American influence on world events and the influence that world events have had on United States history as well as America’s growing role in diplomatic relations throughout the twentieth century and the present. As outlined in the Common Core State Standards students will read and write in modes appropriate to the study of history.

Grade 11 Required for Graduation

United States History (1877 to Present), SE 1 & 5

  • Level 2, 222, 5 credits
  • Level 3, 232, 5 credits
  • Level 4, 242, 5 credits

Students will examine the history of the United States from Reconstruction to the present. Students will investigate and analyze the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution, immigration, and World War I. After studying the Depression and the New Deal, students will look at the factors that led to America’s participation in World War II as well as the consequences of war on American life. Students will also study the causes and course of the Cold War, important social, economic, and political changes, including the Civil Rights Movement and contemporary events and trends that have shaped modern-day United States. The reading and analysis of specified primary sources will be a key feature of this course. As outlined in the Common Core State Standards students will read and write in modes appropriate to the study of history.

Semester Elective Courses

Students who have neither taken nor successfully completed the U.S. Government component in grade 9 must successfully complete a semester course in U.S. Government for graduation. The following elective courses can fulfill the U.S. Government requirement:

  • U.S. Government (223, 233, 234)
  • Intro. To Contemporary Law (260, 270, 280)

Capstone Option: If a student wishes to combine an elective course with the History Capstone Program, the student will take the elective course in the fall, and continue with the History Capstone in the spring. This program is a full year for Level 1 credit.

Grades 10, 11, and 12

United States Government, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 2, 223, 2 ½ credits
  • Level 3, 233, 2 ½ credits
  • Level 4, 243, 2 ½ credits

This course is designed for students to study government at the local, state, and national levels. The American heritage of individual rights and responsibilities will be examined as well as the study of the United States Constitution. Students will examine and analyze the systems of separation of powers and checks and balances as well as the fundamental principles of constitutional and representative democracy at every level of our government. Direct student involvement in political process is encouraged and considered an integral part of this course. Outside speakers will be invited to discuss various aspects of government with students. As outlined in the Common Core State Standards students will read and write in modes appropriate to the study of history.

Contemporary Global Issues, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 1 (Capstone) ,* 219, 5 credits
  • Level 2, 227, 2 ½ credits
  • Level 3, 237, 2 ½ credits
  • Level 4, 24, 2 ½ credits

See History Capstone section

This course will focus on challenging issues of the day in each region of the world. The course will utilize various media such as magazines, newspapers, films, study guide sheets, handouts, and community resources. Course content will include a broad spectrum of issues such as “Human Rights”, “Nuclear Power and Weapons”, “Terrorism and National Security”, “Health”, “Globalization and the World Economy” and “International Trade and Relations”. Emphasis will be placed on issues related to youth and will often be conducted as a seminar. Capstone option offered to juniors and seniors only.

Public Speaking I, SE 2 & 4

  • Level 2, 262, 2 ½ credits

* There are no prerequisites for Honors Level 2 credit.

This interdisciplinary performance-based semester elective course will introduce students to the fundamentals of oral communication. Students will learn how to develop and express ideas related to informative and persuasive speaking in a public setting. Students will also learn how to research and organize facts, think critically, and prepare and deliver informal presentations as well as longer speeches. Through constructive feedback from teachers and peers, students will gain insights on strategies in effective public speaking. This course will also improve a student’s skills in critical listening. This course also aims to overcome anxiety in public presentations and improve speech preparation.

Public Speaking II, SE 2 & 4

  • Level 2, 263, 2 ½ credits

* There are no prerequisites for Honors Level 2 credit.

As a continuation of Public Speaking I, student will engage in more formal speech writing and delivery. This includes, but is not limited to, participating in debate and debate rebuttal, proposing policy changes and delivery of inspirational speeches. Students will also evaluate public speaking engagements for content, rhetoric and efficacy with the intended audience. The class requires more research and writing in studying the art of persuasive speaking than Public Speaking I. Prerequisite of an 80% in Public Speaking I or teacher recommendation is required for enrolling in this class.

Grades 11 and 12

History of Sports in the United States, SE 1 & 5

  • Level 1 (Capstone), * 219, 5 credits
  • Level 2, 228, 2 ½ credits
  • Level 3, 238, 2 ½ credits
  • Level 4, 248, 2 ½ credits

see History Capstone section

* There are no prerequisites for Honors Level 2 credit.

This elective course considers what sports can tell us about American culture and society. Over the duration of one semester students will examine the role of sports in American society spanning from colonial America to modern day American society. In addition to studying the history and reasons for the particular sports that had, and continue to have deep roots in American culture, students will also examine a wide range of issues that American sports have dealt with throughout history. Topics in this course will include: roles of gender, race and class in American sports, the creation and growth of modern day professional and collegiate sports, sports and athletes in American pop culture, the growth of politics and the business side of sports, and morality issues facing sports leagues, organizations and individual athletes. The central goal of this course is to make connections between the history of sports in America with that of American culture and society as a whole. In order to see these connections, the course will use a variety of primary and secondary sources – written, visual and cinematic.

Economics, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 1 (Capstone),* 219, 5 credits
  • Level 2, 225, 2 ½ credits
  • Level 3, 235, 2 ½ credits
  • Level 4, 245, 2 ½ credits

See History Capstone section

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the economic aspects of modern society and to familiarize them with techniques for the analysis of contemporary economic problems. It is organized around three unifying experiences: the Student Company, management simulations, and economic case studies. The practical experiences of the company will serve as the basis for later, more theoretical learning. A variety of teaching techniques will be employed. A business consultant, serving the student company, will enrich student experience. The course is designed for the general student as well as those who plan careers in economics. Both Macro and Micro Economics concepts will be taught.

Grade 12

Psychology, SE 1 & 5

  • Level 2, 226, 2 ½ credits
  • Level 3, 236, 2 ½ credits
  • Level 4, 246, 2 ½ credits

This program introduces students to comparative and experimental analysis of behavior development. Students acquire knowledge in the areas of personality development, the nature of learning, family structure, small group behavior, and the examination of heredity and environment in character growth.

Sociology, SE 1 & 5

  • Level 1 (Capstone),* 219 5 credits
  • Level 2, 229 2 ½ credits
  • Level 3, 239 2 ½ credits
  • Level 4, 249 2 ½ credits

See History Capstone section

Sociology is defined broadly as the social science that studies human society and social behavior. This course introduces theories of socialization focusing on the impact of nature vs. nurture. Additionally, the course looks at sociology perspectives of group behavior through sports, war, and deviant behavior. An application of traditional and non-traditional American values takes place through interviews and a look at the American Dream. The course takes a hands-on look at how sociologists conduct research. Level 2 students will complete an additional choice assignment for Honors level credit.

Introduction to Contemporary Law, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 1 (Capstone),* 219, 5 credits
  • Level 2, 260, 2 ½ credits
  • Level 3, 270, 2 ½ credits
  • Level 4, 280, 2 ½ credits

See History Capstone section

Students will explore the U.S. Justice system with a focus on the Massachusetts Courts. Students will focus on criminal matters (including the function of police, juries, judges, and incarceration), as well as on civil matters (including the settlement of legal disputes). Students will utilize various primary and secondary sources as well as they view and respond to film and documentary footage. Student-centered activities include analysis of legal hypotheticals, mock trials and debates over controversial laws, and student-generated lessons on landmark Supreme Court decisions. Outside speakers will be invited to discuss various aspects of the law with students.

History of Braintree, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 1 (Capstone),* 219, 5 credits
  • Level 2, 265, 2 ½ credits
  • Level 3, 275, 2 ½ credits

See History Capstone section

Students enrolled in this semester-long research-based course will research and examine the history, geography, economy, government, and politics of the town of Braintree, Massachusetts, from its founding in 1625 to the present day. Students may visit the National Archives in Waltham, Massachusetts, Historical Society, Commonwealth Museum, and Massachusetts Genealogical Society in Boston, Braintree Town Hall, General Sylvanus Thayer Birthplace Museum (“Thayer House”), and Gilbert L. Bean Museum and Resource Center in Braintree. Students will be exploring, investigating, and analyzing various primary source documents and artifacts that collectively tell the story of their hometown. Guest speakers will be invited to discuss various aspects of the town of Braintree. Students will contribute in developing the primary text for this course. Students will also be expected to complete a culminating final research project (or paper) that will count as the final exam grade.

The Soul of a Nation: American History Through Music, SE 1, 2 & 4

  • Level 2 1900-present (full year), 250, 5 credits
  • Level 2 1900-1955 (fall) 1955-present (spring), 251, 2 ½ credits

* There are no prerequisites for Honors Level 2 credit.

This is an Honors (Level 2) project-based course (partnering with the Music Department) that will explore the concept of art imitating life from 1900 to 21st century America. Students will use the music lab to create original multimedia based work for their end-of-course (final) project. The course starts with African-American slave spirituals and storytelling through song and dance and its interaction with existing American music. As the 1900’s develops so does the complexity, character, and sound of American music. American music reflects social, cultural, political, and economic events. The course will explore the concept of the melting pot that makes up the American identity as represented through music. Students will explore the relationship between American and international music. Students will also study how the world changed over the years and how music reflected that change. Topics include but are not limited to: bluegrass, soul, gospel, country, blues, jazz, rock n roll, funk, hip hop, and electronic music. This course is offered as a full year course (from 1900 to present) as well as semester elective course offerings: from 1900 to 1955 (fall semester) and 1955 to present (spring semester).


Advanced Placement Courses (Full Year)

Prerequisite: Due to the rigorous college-level workload in Advanced Placement Social Studies courses, students must have achieved a grade of C or better in their current Level 1 Social Studies class or must have strong recommendations of the current Social Studies teachers and the approvals of the AP teacher and the Director of Social Studies. The department strongly recommends that students demonstrate a similar level of achievement in their current English classes.

Grades 10 and 12

Advanced Placement European History, SE 1 & 5

  • Level 1/AP, 214, 5 credits

* The successful completion of this course will fulfill the World History requirement for graduation.

This is a course designed for a student with deep interest in history. Students who elect this course should be prepared to handle college level work. This course is an intense survey of the development of Western culture and the comprehension of fundamental social science concepts employed by a historian. Students will be asked to weigh and use historical evidence to interpret meaning and communicate clearly and concisely. This study serves as a culmination of the world and modern world history program with emphasis on European history against a global background. Students will be expected to take the Advanced Placement exam in May. Students enrolled in AP European History will be expected to complete a summer assignment to be submitted at a specified date.

Advanced Placement Human Geography, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 1/AP, 215, 5 credits

* The successful completion of this course will fulfill the World History requirement for graduation.

The purpose of the Advanced Placement course in Human Geography is to introduce the students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use and alteration of earth's surface. Students will employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to human social organization and its environmental consequences. Students will examine intensely: 1) Geographic concepts; 2) Population; 3) Cultural Patterns; 4) Political Organization of Space; 5) Agriculture and Rural Land use; 6) Industrialization and Economic Development; and 7) Cities and Urban Land use. Students will be expected to take the Advanced Placement exam in May. Students enrolled in AP Human Geography will be expected to complete a reading assignment and a project during the summer to be submitted by a specified due date.

Grade 11

Advanced Placement U.S. History, SE 1 & 5

  • Level 1/AP, 212, 5 credits

* The successful completion of this course will fulfill the U.S. History requirement for graduation.

This course is designed for students with a deep interest in history, a high degree of self-motivation, and the capacity to manage college work. Supplementary readings, critical reviews, and research papers are integral to the course. Students will be expected to read historical material analytically and critically, to weigh historical evidence and interpretations, and to reach sound conclusions on the basis of informed judgments. During the second semester, projects employing primary sources will complete the final preparation of the students for The College Board Advanced Placement United States History exam in May, which the students will be expected to take. Students enrolled in Advanced Placement United States History will be expected to read certain assigned chapters in the text over the summer, and complete corresponding written assignments to be submitted by a specified due date.


Grade 12

Advanced Placement U.S. Government & Politics, SE 1 & 5

  • Level 1/AP, 213, 5 credits

* The successful completion of this course will fulfill the U.S. Government requirement for graduation.

This course is designed for students with an interest in government, politics and the law. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement exam in May. Besides familiarity with the institutions of government, students will focus on the controversies that constitute United States political reality. Primary units of study: the Constitution, political beliefs and behaviors, civil rights and liberties, the supremacy of the Supreme Court, the interaction of the print and electronic media on politics, federalism, the complexity of our dual court system and the influence of interest groups on legislation and campaigns.

Methodology: guest speakers, mock student Supreme Court presentations, attendance at governmental meetings, an independent field trip to the U.S. District Court, in class debates and involvement in local political campaigns. Students enrolled in Advanced Placement American Government will be expected to prepare a summer portfolio assignment to be submitted by a specified date.

Advanced Placement Psychology, SE 1 & 5

  • Level 1/AP, 216, 5 credits

Advance Placement Psychology is a program designed to introduce “the systematic and scientific study of behavior and mental processes.” Emphasis will be placed on the fundamental paradigms of psychological theory, research methodology and statistical reporting techniques associated with this field. In addition, students will become cognizant of the facts, principles, and phenomena of the major sub fields of the discipline. Students will be expected to take the Advanced Placement exam in May. Students enrolled in Advanced Placement Psychology will be assigned summer reading and corresponding written assignments to be submitted by a specified due date.

History Capstone Project

Grades 11, 12

History Capstone Project: Community-Based Service Learning (Independent Research Project) in Coordination with Social Studies Elective, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 1, 219, 5 credits

Juniors and seniors can participate in the History Capstone project and earn Level 1 Advanced Honors credits toward their social studies elective course taken in the 2018-2019 school year. Students enrolled in the Capstone program will attend and fully participate in the social studies elective course in the Fall Semester and work independently under the supervision of the Director of Social Studies in the Spring Semester. Students will identify a societal need or problem, and develop and support a thesis relevant to the subject matter in their social studies elective course. Students will also investigate how community-based service reflects the basic core principles of our Constitution, American democratic ideals, and civic virtue and responsibilities. Students are required to perform at least 20 hours of community service related to their History Capstone project topic and visit various community and local government institutions. Students are also required to participate in all Capstone-related activities including after-school seminars, cohort-style meetings with fellow participating students, online readings and assignments, and meet with the Director of Social Studies at least once per cycle. Weekly seminars will explore topics on community-based service learning; career opportunities in the student’s areas of interest; thesis development; and undergraduate-level research methods and writing. Students will compose and submit their final paper (15-20 pages) in late May or early June. Student will appear before a Capstone review panel to defend her or his thesis and present research findings to support her or his thesis.

Participating Social Studies Elective Courses: Contemporary Global Issues, Contemporary Law, History of Sports in the U.S., History of Braintree, Economics, and Sociology. Note: Elective course must be taken in the fall semester. History Capstone option is not available if elective course is only offered in spring semester.

Prerequisite: Complete application and strong recommendation from this year’s social studies teacher. Students are required to draft a History Capstone project proposal due September 2018.

History Capstone Project: Community-Based Service Learning (Independent Research Project), SE 2 & 3

  • Level 1, 217, 5 credits

Juniors and seniors will identify and independently research a societal need or problem, and develop and support a thesis that relates to how community service learning reflects the basic core principles of our Constitution, American democratic ideals, and civic virtue and responsibilities. Students will be expected to perform at least 20 hours of community service related to their History Capstone project and visit various community and local government institutions. Students will participate in all History Capstone-related activities including after-school seminars, cohort-style meetings with fellow participating students, online readings and assignments, and meet with the Director of Social Studies at least once per cycle. Weekly seminars will explore topics on community-based service learning; career opportunities in the student’s areas of interest; thesis development; and undergraduate-level research methods and writing. Students will compose and submit their final paper (15-20 pages) in late May or early June. Student will appear before a Capstone review panel to defend her or his thesis and present research findings to support her or his thesis.

Prerequisite: Complete application and strong recommendation from this year’s social studies teacher. Students are required to draft a History Capstone project proposal due September 2018.


Science

The Science Department offers several courses in the biological and physical sciences at four performance levels.

Full Year Courses

Grade 9

Advanced Honors Biology, SE 1 & 5

  • Level 1, 310, 6 credits

This course is an in-depth study of biological molecules, cell structure and function, DNA and molecular genetics, classical genetics, evolution, physiology and ecology. The pace is rapid. Enrolling students must be responsible and independent learners. Summer reading and assignments are required. Students in this course will take the Biology MCAS exam in the spring. Students are enrolled in this course based on measures of middle school science mastery, such as science grades and performance on science placement exams. Students must also enroll in Biology Lab 301.

Honors Biology, SE 1 & 5

  • Level 2, 320, 6 credits

This course is a thorough study of biological molecules, cell structure and function, DNA and molecular genetics, classical genetics, evolution, physiology and ecology. The pace is rapid. Students in this course will take the Biology MCAS exam in the spring. Students are enrolled in this course based on measures of mastery, such as science grades and performance on science placement exams. Students must also enroll in Biology Lab 301.

College Prep Introductory Physics, SE 1 & 5

  • Level 3, 330, 6 credits

This course examines physics from a conceptual and mathematical viewpoint. Topics covered include: mechanics, laws of motion, heat, electricity, light, sound, atomic theory of matter, radioactivity and nuclear energy. Students in this course will take the Introductory Physics MCAS exam in the spring. Students are enrolled in this course based on measures of middle school science mastery, such as science grades and performance on science placement exams. Students must also enroll in Introductory Physics Lab 305.

Introductory Physics, SE 1 & 5

  • Level 4, 340, 6 credits

This course examines physics from a conceptual viewpoint. Topics covered include: mechanics, laws of motion, heat, electricity, light, sound, atomic theory of matter, radioactivity and nuclear energy. Students in this course will take the Introductory Physics MCAS exam in the spring. Students are enrolled in this course based on measures of middle school science mastery, such as science grades and performance on science placement exams. Students must also enroll in Introductory Physics Lab 305.

Grade 10

Advanced Honors Chemistry, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 1, 311, 6 credits

This course is an in-depth study of matter and change, atomic structure, chemical names and formulas, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, states of matter, gas laws, chemical periodicity, ionic and covalent bonding, solutions, reaction rates and equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation-reduction reactions, electrochemistry, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. The pace is extremely rapid. Summer reading and assignments are required. Concurrent enrollment in Level 1 Math or written permission of the Director of Science is required. Students must also enroll in Chemistry Lab 302.

Honors Chemistry, SE 4a & 4b

  • Level 2, 322, 6 credits

This course is a thorough study of matter and change, atomic structure, chemical names and formulas, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, states of matter, gas laws, chemical periodicity, ionic and covalent bonding, solutions, reaction rates and equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation-reduction reactions, electrochemistry, organic chemistry and nuclear chemistry. The pace is rapid. Concurrent enrollment in Level 2 Math or written permission of the Director of Science is required. Students must also enroll in Chemistry Lab 302.

College Prep Biology, SE 4a & 4b

  • Level 3, 331, 6 credits

This course is a thorough study of biological molecules, cell structure and function, DNA and molecular genetics, classical genetics, evolution, physiology and ecology. This laboratory course addresses the Massachusetts curriculum standards for biology. Students must also enroll in Biology Lab 301.

Biology, SE 4a & 4b

  • Level 4, 341, 6 credits

This course is a thorough study of biological molecules, cell structure and function, DNA and molecular genetics, classical genetics, evolution, physiology and ecology. This laboratory course addresses the Massachusetts curriculum standards for biology at an individualized pace. Students must also enroll in Biology Lab 301.

Grade 11

Honors Physics, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 2, 323, 6 credits

This course is a thorough study of motion, forces, work and energy, momentum, rotational motion and gravity, fluid mechanics, heat thermodynamics, waves and sound, light, electricity and magnetism and modern physics. The pace is rapid and students are expected to solve problems both conceptually and with a high degree of mathematical rigor. Concurrent enrollment in Level 2 Math or written permission of the Director of Science is required. Students must also enroll in Honors Physics Lab 303.

College Prep Chemistry, SE 4c & 4d

  • Level 3, 332, 6 credits

This course is a thorough study of matter and change, atomic structure, chemical names and formulas, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, states of matter, gas laws, chemical periodicity, ionic and covalent bonding, solutions, reaction rates and equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation-reduction reactions, electrochemistry, organic chemistry and nuclear chemistry. This laboratory course meets college entrance requirements. Students must also enroll in Chemistry CP Lab 307.

Chemistry, SE 4c & 4d

  • Level 4, 342, 6 credits

This course utilizes guided inquiry and laboratory exploration to address concepts of matter and change, atomic structure, chemical names and formulas, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, states of matter, gas laws, chemical periodicity, ionic and covalent bonding, solutions, reaction rates and equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation-reduction reactions, electrochemistry, organic chemistry and nuclear chemistry. Students must also enroll in Chemistry CP Lab 307.

Grade 12

Astronomy and Astrophysics, SE 4c & 4d

  • Levels 2 & 3, 325/333, 5 credits

The course goal is to provide students with enduring conceptual and analytical understanding of the major concepts in astronomy and astrophysics. Students will develop advanced critical thinking and reasoning skills, such as data gathering and analysis, and connecting concepts within and across domains. Concepts addressed will include celestial mechanics, optics and instrumentation, planetary systems, the nature of stars, the properties of galaxies, and the structure and evolution of the universe.

Forensic Science, SE 4c & 4d

  • Level 2 & 3, 327/337, 5 credits

This course will explore the scientific concepts of biology, chemistry, physics, math, psychology and literature to illustrate the multifaceted discipline known as forensic science. Traditional science skills like observation, experimental design & lab skills, data collection and evaluation will be emphasized. Topics covered include evidence collection protocols, microscopes, hair, fiber, pollen and fingerprint analysis, DNA technology, blood & chemical analysis, forgery, forensic anthropology, and the criminal mind. Comprehensive crime scene analysis is used to cumulatively assess skills learned throughout the course.

Human Anatomy and Physiology, SE 4c & 4d

  • Levels 2 & 3, 324/335, 5 credits

This course is a thorough study of human structure and function. After a brief review of cells, tissues and organs, the course focuses on the human body in terms of the integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and the senses, the cardiovascular system, immune system, respiratory system, excretory system, endocrine system, reproductive system, digestive system, food, nutrition and metabolism. Issues of biotechnology are addressed throughout the course.

Principles of Engineering, SE 4c & 4d

  • Levels 2 & 3, 326/339, 5 credits

In this course students will experience project-based learning, as they engage in innovative product creation. They will learn about the major areas of engineering, as well as the manufacturing process and product life cycle. To support them in product development, students will be trained in the engineering design process and in the use of CAD software.

Grades 10, 11, 12

College Prep Physics, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 3, 334, 6 credits

This course examines physics from a conceptual and mathematical viewpoint. Emphasis is placed on developing a strong conceptual understanding of physical principle. Topics covered include: mechanics, motion, waves and sound, light and optics, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, and atomic physics. This course is open to students who need to take physics at level 3 and are not in 9th grade. Students must also enroll in CP Physics Lab 304.

Science Laboratory Assistance (Semester Course), SE 4c & 4d

  • Level 3, 336, 1 credit

This program offers practical experience for chosen students who are interested in the organization and preparation of materials and equipment in addition to their regular science coursework. Students will be expected to assist during a minimum of two specified study periods and for occasional short periods at the end of the school day. Participants will be encouraged to engage in independent research projects and study. Students in Grade 10, 11, and 12 may enroll by obtaining the recommendation of a science teacher and written permission of the Director of Science. This course may be repeated for credit.

Advanced Placement Courses

Grades 10, 11, 12

Advanced Placement Chemistry, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 1, 316, 7 credits

Advanced Placement Chemistry is the equivalent of a freshman college course in chemistry. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Examination in May. The course goal is to provide students with enduring conceptual understanding of essential chemistry concepts. Students will also develop advanced inquiry and reasoning skills, such as designing investigations, collecting and analyzing data, and connecting concepts within and across domains. Concepts include: atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular models, gas laws, solution chemistry, acid-base reactions, oxidation-reduction reactions, stoichiometry, equilibrium, reaction rates, and thermodynamics. This course is open to Grade 11 and 12 students who have completed Advanced Honors or Honors Chemistry and Biology. Grade 11 students who elect AP Chemistry must take Physics concurrently or in their senior year. Written recommendation of the current science teacher or permission from the Director of Science is required. Exceptionally able Grade 10 students may enroll in AP Chemistry with the written permission of their current Biology teacher and the Director of Science. Summer reading and assignments are required and must be completed for admission to the course in September.

Grade 11

Advanced Placement Physics 1, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 1, 312, 7 credits

Advanced Placement Physics 1 is the equivalent of a first semester algebra-based college course in physics. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement examination in May. The course goal is to provide students with a rigorous foundation of the principles of mechanics. Students will also engage in inquiry-based learning and develop critical thinking and reasoning skills related to vectors, motion in one and two dimensions, forces, work and energy, momentum, and rotational dynamics. This course is open to Grade 11 or 12 students who have successfully completed Advanced Honors or Honors Chemistry who are enrolled in Level 1 mathematics. Written recommendation of the current science teacher or permission from the Director of Science is required. Summer reading and assignments are required and must be completed for admission to the course in September.

Grade 12

Advanced Placement Biology, SE 4a & 4b

  • Level 1, 314, 7 credits

Advanced Placement Biology is the equivalent of a two semester freshman college course in general Biology. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Examination in May. The course goal is to provide students with enduring conceptual understanding of major biology concepts. Students will also develop advanced inquiry and reasoning skills, such as designing investigations, collecting and analyzing data, and connecting concepts within and across domains. Concepts include: science as a process; evolution; energy transfer; continuity and change; relationship of structure and function; regulation; interdependence in nature; and science, technology and society. This course is open to Grade 11 and 12 students who have successfully completed Honors or Advanced Honors Biology and Chemistry. Grade 11 students who elect AP Biology must take Physics concurrently or in their senior year. Written recommendation of the current science teacher or permission from the Director of Science is required. Summer reading and assignments are required and must be completed for admission to the course in September.

Advanced Placement Environmental Science, SE 4c & 4d

  • Level 1, 317, 7 credits

Advanced Placement Environmental Science is designed to be the equivalent of a one semester, introductory college course in environmental science. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement examination in May. The goal of the course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. It is a rigorous science course that stresses scientific principles and analysis and includes a laboratory component. This course is open to Grade 11 and 12 students who have completed Advanced Honors or Honors Biology and Chemistry. Grade 11 students who elect AP Environmental Science must take Physics concurrently or in their senior year. Written recommendation of the current science teacher or permission from the Director of Science is required. Summer reading and assignments are required and must be completed for admission to the course in September.

Advanced Placement Physics 2, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 1, 315, 7 credits

Advanced Placement Physics 2 is the equivalent of a second semester algebra-based college course in physics. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement examination in May. The course focuses on topics of physics not covered in Advanced Placement Physics 1. Students will also engage in inquiry-based learning and develop critical thinking and reasoning skills. Concepts addressed include: waves and sound, optics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, and modern physics including quantum mechanics. This course is open to Grade 12 students who have successfully completed Advanced Placement Physics 1 and who are enrolled in Level 1 mathematics. The course is also open to exemplary students who have completed Honors Physics with very high marks. Written recommendation of the current science teacher or permission from the Director of Science is required. Summer reading and assignments are required and must be completed for admission to the course in September

Mathematics

The Mathematics Department offers a range of core courses that meet or exceed the requirements of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. These courses stress critical thinking, reasoning, problem solving, communicating mathematically, the appropriate use of technology, and connections to the real world. In addition to the core courses, the math department also offers elective courses in the field of computer science. Please note that students are recommended for specific levels based on their educational strengths and needs.

Grade 9

Geometry, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 1, 410, 5 credits
  • Level 2, 420, 5 credits
  • Level 3A,430, 5 credits
  • Level 3B, 431, 5 credits

Students will take a full year of Geometry aligned to the Massachusetts Mathematics Curriculum Frameworks. The course will do an in-depth study of the field of Euclidean geometry with topics such as number and quantity, congruence, similarity, right triangles and trigonometry, circles, expressing geometric properties with equations, geometric measurement and dimension, modeling with geometry, and statistics and probability.

Grade 10

Advanced Honors Algebra 1 & 2, SE 4a & 4b

  • Level 1, 411, 5 credits

Students will take a full year of Algebra 1&2 aligned to the Massachusetts Mathematics Curriculum Frameworks. The course will do an in-depth study of number and quantity, seeing structure in expressions, arithmetic with polynomials and rational expressions, creating equations, reasoning with equations and inequalities, functions, and statistics and probability. The prerequisite for this course is a C, however, the math department recommends that the students enrolling in this course have achieved a grade of at least a B- in Advanced Honors Geometry.

Honors Algebra 1 & 2, SE 4a & 4b

  • Level 2, 421, 5 credits

Students will take a full year of Algebra 1&2 aligned to the Massachusetts Mathematics Curriculum Frameworks. The course will cover the topics of number and quantity, seeing structure in expressions, arithmetic with polynomials and rational expressions, creating equations, reasoning with equations and inequalities, functions, and statistics and probability.

Algebra 1, SE 4a & 4b

  • Level 3A, 432, 5 credits
  • Level 3B, 433, 5 credits

Students will take a full year of Algebra 1 as outlined in the Massachusetts Mathematics Curriculum Frameworks. Students will work with the real number system extended to exponents and irrational numbers. They will examine linear, quadratic, and exponential functions and learn how to interpret the structure of algebraic expressions, create equations, and reason with both equations and inequalities. The course also has a statistics and probability component.

Grade 11

Advanced Honors Algebra 2/Pre-Calculus, SE 1 & 5

  • Level 1, 412, 5 credits

Students will learn Pre-Calculus as defined by the Massachusetts Mathematics Curriculum Framework. They will study polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and exponential functions. Students will cover trigonometry in great detail through the unit circle and apply trigonometry to non-right triangles. The course ends with a study of conic sections, sequences and series, and an introduction to calculus.

Honors Algebra 2/Pre-Calculus, SE 1 & 5

  • Level 2, 422, 5 credits

This course begins with a completion of Algebra 2 topics followed by a study of Pre-Calculus topics as defined by the Massachusetts Mathematics Curriculum Frameworks. Students will study the complex number system as well as vector and matrix quantities. They will become proficient with arithmetic with polynomials and rational expressions and interpreting functions. They will also study trigonometric functions including applying trigonometry to general triangles.

Algebra 2, SE 1 & 5

  • Level 3A, 434, 5 credits
  • Level 3B, 435, 5 credits

This course includes a full year of Algebra 2 aligned to the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. Students will first review quadratic functions before moving on to study polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, and trigonometric functions. In addition to analyzing functions, students will also practice the skill of applying algebraic methods to a variety of situations.

Grade 12

Advanced Placement Calculus BC, SE 4c & 4d

  • Level 1, 413, 5 credits

This course discusses all of the topics listed by the College Board in the AP Calculus BC course description, including a thorough investigation of derivatives and integrals, and infinite sequences and series. Students enrolled in this course will be required to take the AP Calculus BC exam in May. This course has a required summer assignment. The prerequisite for this course is a C, however, the math department recommends that the students enrolling in this course have achieved a grade of at least an A- in Advanced Honors Algebra 2/Pre-Calculus.

Advanced Placement Calculus AB, SE 4c & 4d

  • Level 1, 414, 5 credits

This course discusses all of the topics listed by the College Board in the AP Calculus AB course description including a thorough investigation of limits, followed by the techniques and applications of derivatives and integrals. Students enrolled in this course will be required to take the AP Calculus AB exam in May. This course has a required summer assignment. The prerequisite for this course is a C, however, the math department recommends that students enrolling in this course have achieved a grade of at least a B- in Advanced Honors Algebra 2/Pre-Calculus or at least an A in Honors Algebra 2/Pre-Calculus.

Honors Calculus, SE 4c & 4d

  • Level 2, 423, 5 credits

Honors Calculus begins with a review of Pre-Calculus topics which includes an analysis of rational, algebraic, trigonometric, and exponential functions and an investigation of limits. This is then followed by an introduction to the study of differentiation and integration of those functions. This course also introduces their application to related rates, optimization, area and volume of surfaces of revolution, differential equations and other topics. This course has a required summer assignment. It is recommended that students taking this course have a strong foundation in algebra.

Honors Statistics, SE 4c & 4d

  • Level 2, 424, 5 credits

This course guides students through the major components of an introductory college level statistics course. Specific course topics will include data analysis, the normal curve, scatter plots, probability, confidence intervals, and sampling distributions. Students will work with technology, including the TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator and online programs in order to develop a complete understanding of the statistical approach to data collection and analysis. Please note that this course requires much more reading and writing than most math courses. It is recommended that students be securing honors grades in level 1 or 2 English.

College Prep Pre-Calculus, SE 4c & 4d

  • Level 3, 436, 5 credits

This full year pre-calculus course begins with a review of topics from Algebra 2, including quadratic and cubic functions. The course then examines the characteristics of rational, radical, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, with an emphasis on investigating their domain, range and intercepts. This investigation will be enhanced by the use of a graphing calculator, which is required for this course. The prerequisite for this course is a C, however, the math department recommends that students enrolling in this course have achieved a B or higher in College Algebra 2 (434).

College Prep Statistics, SE4c & 4d

  • Level 3, 438, 5 credits

This course guides students through the major components of an introductory college level statistics course. Specific course topics will include data analysis, the normal curve, scatter plots, probability, sampling distributions, entrance exam preparation, and applications of algebra. Students will work with technology, including the TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator and online programs in order to develop a complete understanding of the statistical approach to data collection and analysis.

Grades 11 and 12

Advanced Placement Statistics, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 1, 415, 5 credits

This course includes all topics included in the Advanced Placement course description for Statistics. Topics focus on the four major pillars of Statistics: Data Exploration, Data Collection, Probability, and Inference. Topics include organizing data, processing data, the laws of probability, and inference testing. Emphasis is on combining mathematical problem solving with written analysis of work. This course has a required summer assignment. Students will take the Advance Placement Exam in May.

Students enrolling in this course in Grades 9 & 10 must have the recommendation of their current math teacher. The prerequisite for this course is a C, however, the math department recommends that Grade 11 students enrolling in this course have achieved at least a B- in Advanced Honors Algebra 1&2. For Grade 12 students, the department recommends that students enrolling in this course have achieved at least a B from Honors Algebra 2/Pre-Calculus. Since this course requires extensive reading and writing, all students enrolling in this course should be securing honors grades in Level 1 or 2 English.

Electives

Exploring Computer Science

  • Unleveled, 427, 2½ credits

This course, open to all students in Grades 9-12, is an introduction to computer science and computational practice for students with no prior programming experience. Topics include human computer interaction, problem solving, web design, and programming. Students will discuss ethical and social issues in computing and careers in computing. They will be introduced to the concept of open-source software development and explore its implications.

Honors Computer Science Principles

  • Level 2, 426, 5 credits

This course is modeled on the AP Computer Science Principles course. The course introduces the central idea of computer science as well as how computers are changing the world. Students develop computational artifacts while using simulations to explore central questions. The course involves analyzing data and communicating collaboratively about the findings.

Pre-requisite: Students enrolling in this course in Grade 9 must have the recommendation of their current math teacher. All students enrolling in this course should meet level 1 or level 2 Math and English (writing) pre-requisites.

Please Note: Honors Computer Science Principles (426) contains a broader scope of the computer sciences than AP Computer Science A (416). This course also has a less technical yet still rigorous approach towards programming than AP Computer Science A (416).

Advanced Placement Computer Science Principles

  • Level 1, 417, 5 credits

This course introduces the central idea of computer science as well as how computers are changing the world. Students develop computational artifacts while using simulations to explore central questions. The course involves analyzing data and communicating collaboratively about the findings. Students will take the Advanced Placement exam in May. Students enrolling in this course in grade 9 must have the recommendation of their current math teacher. Since this course requires extensive reading and writing, all students enrolling in this course should be securing honors grades in Level 1 or 2 English.

Please Note: Advanced Placement Computer Science Principles (417) contains a broader scope of the computer sciences than AP Computer Science A (416). The course also has a less technical yet still rigorous approach towards programming than AP Computer Science A (416).

Advanced Placement Computer Science A, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 1, 416, 5 credits

The course includes all topics included in the Advanced Placement course description for Computer Science A. The course emphasizes object-oriented programming methodology with a concentration on problem solving and algorithm development and is meant to be the equivalent of a first-semester college-level course in computer science. It also includes the study of data structures, design and abstraction. Students will take the Advanced Placement exam in May.

Students enrolling in this course in grades 9 & 10 must have the recommendation of their current math teacher. Since this course requires extensive reading and writing, all students enrolling in this course should be securing honors grades in Level 1 or 2 English.

Student Technician (Semester Course), SE 2 & 3

  • Unleveled, 428, 1 ½ credits

This program offers practical experience for chosen students who are interested in the troubleshooting, repair, and deployment of hardware and software in addition to their regular Computer Science coursework. Students will be expected to assist during specified study periods. Participants will engage in independent problem solving, research, and design projects. Students in Grade 10, 11, and 12 may enroll by obtaining the recommendation of a past Computer Science teacher, a guidance counselor or a housemaster and obtaining a signature from the Director or Coordinator of Technology. This course may be repeated for credit.

Math Workshop, SE 2 & 3

  • Unleveled, 406, 1 credit

Math Workshop is a small-group class designed to support freshmen students in achieving a successful transition to high school math work and expectations by providing individualized instruction in math standards, organization skills, and study skills based on each student’s needs. Instruction may include pre-teaching and practice of key skills from the 9th grade curriculum. Reinforcement of successful organizational routines and study strategies will allow students to build increased independence as learners. The course is open to freshmen upon recommendation of the teacher or guidance counselor. This course may be repeated for credit. This course runs on an as-needed basis.

Math Strategies (MCAS Preparation), SE 4a & 4b

  • Unleveled, 405, 2 ½ credits

This semester course meets 3 days in every 7-day cycle. This first semester course is a comprehensive review of Algebra I. The second semester course is an examination of strategies needed to solve problems as well as the mathematics covered in the Massachusetts Mathematics Frameworks (Statistics, Probability, Algebra, Geometry, Ratios, and Discrete Math). This course runs on an as-needed basis.

Math Tutor, SE 4c & 4d

  • Unleveled, 464, 3 credits

To be considered for this course, students must have successfully completed Geometry, Algebra I, and Algebra II courses and have the recommendation of their current math teacher. Prospective students will be interviewed by the Director of Mathematics. Those candidates who are qualified will be assigned to a specific course and teacher to tutor students in math during the school day.

SAT Lab, (SAT Preparation)

  • Unleveled,132, 1 credit

All Grade 11 students who take the PSAT in October will be assigned to this once-per-cycle course which meets in the computer lab. Students will have access to individualized SAT preparatory instruction in critical reading, writing, and mathematics via online resources from the College Board. This course is co-listed with English; meeting once in the cycle satisfies responsibilities in both departments. (Semester Two)

World Languages

Braintree High School's graduation requirements include two years of World Language study (in the same language) with courses taken at the high school level. The World Languages Department will offer courses in French and Spanish. The choice of which World Language to study should be based on the student's personal preference and career plans.

Advanced Placement Courses

Advanced Placement courses are offered in French and Spanish. These courses are the equivalent of third year college courses. Students enrolled in these courses must plan to take the appropriate AP examination. Each course is designed to complete the required curriculum in two years. Enrollment in these courses is recommended only for students who have completed the third year of French or Spanish at Level 1 with a grade of "C" or better, and who have secured the written approval of their current teacher, guidance counselor, and director. Students should see course descriptions for further details.

Courses offered include:

  • French 1 5 credits - 520, 530, SE 4c & 4d
  • French 2 5 credits - 511, 521, 531, SE 4c & 4d
  • French 3 5 credits - 512, 522, 532, SE 1 & 5
  • French 4 5 credits - 513, 523, SE 4a & 4b
  • French 5 5 credits - 514, 524, SE 4a & 4b
  • Spanish 1 5 credits - 560, 570, 580, SE 4c & 4d
  • Spanish 2 5 credits - 551, 561, 571, 581, SE 4c & 4d
  • Spanish 3 5 credits - 552, 562, 572, SE 1 & 5
  • Spanish 4 5 credits - 553, 563, SE 4a & 4b
  • Spanish 5 5 credits - 554, 564, SE 4a & 4b

The following three descriptions apply to the first, second, third, and fourth year of study of French and Spanish. Students should refer to individual course descriptions for fifth year courses.

The first year of study of a modern world language is an introduction to the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students are taught correct pronunciation, rhythm, and intonation and the vocabulary groups common to first year courses such as greetings, weather expressions, articles of clothing, telling time, colors and foods. Essential grammatical concepts are introduced so that students may begin to communicate in the world language. Development of the student's awareness of the culture and civilization of the world language in all countries where it is spoken is an integral part of each course.

The second year of study of a modern world language is an expansion of the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing and of the learning activities introduced in the first year of study. The mastery of new vocabulary is a continuous goal. More complex and complete grammatical concepts are taught and students are further encouraged to communicate in the language. The study of the culture and civilization of the countries where the language is spoken worldwide continues to be an integral part of each course.

The third year of study of a modern world language will enable students to develop a greater facility with the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will put into practice with greater frequency concepts learned during the first two years of study and communication in the language becomes more apparent. Mastery of new vocabulary continues and the remaining finer points of grammar are taught while the length of reading selections increases. At the end of the third year of study, students will have been taught the basic skills necessary for future language development and improvement.

In the fourth year of study of a modern world language, students begin to shift toward two different paths. Those students who plan to take the AP Language and Culture examination must enroll in Level 1. This pre-AP course includes the first half of the essentials of grammar, practice in writing directed essays, development of oral skills, practice in contemporary usage through both literature and culture readings, and the development of the student’s speaking ability in impromptu contexts. This course also begins the study of the six themes of the AP Language and Culture Exam. The Level 2 course is designed for students who have successfully completed three years of the language and who are interested in improving their conversational skills. Students are encouraged to read for comprehension and to use the target language as often as possible in conversation. A continuous review of grammar is conducted in order to maintain skills previously acquired.

Advanced Placement French 5, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 1, 514, 5 credits

This course is a continuation of study for the AP examination for students who have satisfactorily completed French 4 Level 1. It includes more advanced reading and writing with heavy emphasis placed on listening and speaking activities. Students are expected to develop a thorough knowledge of French culture and civilization. There is a thorough development of the six AP themes consisting of Global Challenges, Family and Community, Science and Technology, Contemporary Life, Beauty and Aesthetics, and Personal and Public Identities. Students who successfully complete the course are expected to take the AP examination. Students enrolled in this course are required to complete a summer assignment which may include practice in reading and writing such as keeping a journal, completing grammar exercises or writing an autobiography. Students should be prepared to be tested on this material during the first full week of classes.

French 5, SE 4a & 4b

  • Level 2, 524, 5 credits

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed four years of French. Students will have the opportunity to improve their conversational skills and to learn about contemporary life in French-speaking countries. There will be continued practice for improvement in writing skills. With insufficient enrollment, this course will be taught in conjunction with French 523.

Advanced Placement Spanish 5, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 1, 554, 5 credits

This course is a continuation of study for the AP examination for students who have satisfactorily completed Spanish 4 Level 1. It includes more advanced readings and writing activities with heavy emphasis toward acquiring near native-like fluency and continues to incorporate a thorough knowledge of Spanish culture and civilization. There is a thorough development of the six AP themes consisting of Global Challenges, Family and Community, Science and Technology, Contemporary Life, Beauty and Aesthetics, and Personal and Public Identities.. Students who successfully complete the course are expected to take the AP exam. Students enrolled in this course are required to complete a summer assignment which may include practice in reading and writing such as keeping a journal, completing grammar exercises or writing an autobiography. Students should be prepared to be tested on this material during the first full week of classes.

Spanish 5, SE 4a & 4b

  • Level 2, 564, 5 credits

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed four years of Spanish and who are interested in improving their conversational skills and in learning about contemporary life in Spanish-speaking countries. The main emphasis will be on oral activities making use of current events, books, poems, periodicals and other contemporary readings. There will also be continued improvement of writing and reading skills.

Business

In today’s global economy, it is important that all students have knowledge of the economic and financial world in which they live. The Business Department operates under the philosophy that in order for a student to be considered truly prepared for life after graduation, business education must be a part of their Braintree High School educational experience. Business Education provides students with the foundation to pursue programs such as business administration, accounting, marketing/management, law and finance.

The Business Department provides a wide variety of courses designed to teach business procedures, fundamentals, skills, ethics, and content. Our courses are hands-on, practical, and of value to all students regardless of their future academic plans. All Business Education courses will also provide students with the computer skills necessary to be competitive in both college and the workplace.

Semester Courses

Grades 10, 11, 12

Accounting I, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 2, 621, 2 ½ credits

This course is intended to give students the basic knowledge of the principles and practices encompassing the entire accounting cycle, and how this applies to keeping records for a small business. It includes the theory of debit and credit, journalizing, posting to the ledger, taking a trial balance, and maintaining financial statements. Simulated job experiences with students acting as bookkeepers and accountants will be covered in the course. Students will also gain first had accounting experience and learn about the stock market by participating in the Stock Market Game.

If a student has successfully completed Algebra 2, this course can be counted as a one semester mathematics course.

Grades 11, 12

Advanced Accounting, SE 4a & 4b

  • Level 2, 622, 2 ½ credits

After having completed the study of the accounting cycle in Accounting I, Advanced Accounting will review and expand upon the basic accounting concepts. In Advanced Accounting, accounting records will be generated through the use of Peachtree accounting software, a computerized accounting system.

If a student has successfully completed Algebra 2, this course can be counted as a one semester mathematics course.

Prerequisite: Accounting I

Grades 10, 11, 12

Personal and Business Law, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 2, 623, 2 ½ credits
  • Level 3, 635, 2 ½ credits

This course is designed to lead the student to an understanding of the American legal system and how it applies to them personally. This course not only stresses one’s rights and benefits, but also one’s legal duties, obligations and liabilities. Personal Law relating to crimes, torts, marriage, as well as real estate and insurance will be discussed and researched. Subject matter covered will include civil, criminal, and domestic law issues. Business Law is presented in such a way as to be of personal value to the student in the business-consumer world. (There is a constant stress on business ethics and moral obligations.)

Grades 10, 11, 12

Introduction to College Business, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 2, 628, 2 ½ credits
  • Level 3, 638, 2 ½ credits

Introduction to College Business exposes students to the various business fields (accounting, finance, management, and marketing) at a two-year or four-year college and was created in cooperation with local area colleges to prepare students to further study business after high school. Through hands-on experience, analysis of current business issues and inspection of annual reports, students will examine business and build entrepreneurial skills. During the course, the class will create a business plan, start a company, and be responsible for the full spectrum of the business operations of the company. A computerized approach will be utilized throughout the entire course integrating Microsoft Excel and PowerPoint to facilitate financial analysis and solve business problems. Students will also examine the stock market and learn how businesses can be affected by the market’s performance by participating in the Stock Market Game.

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Introduction to Occupations, SE 1 & 5

  • Level 3, 636, 2 ½ credits

This semester course includes topics such as career exploration, job preparation skills, social and environmental issues, budgeting, tax preparation, credit, consumer rights, checking and insurance. This course is designed to build a foundation of knowledge and skills that would fully prepare a student to enter the workforce after graduation and be competitive. Emphasis will be given to the direction of the job market to guide students toward a solid decision for a first career.

Grades 11, 12

Personal Finance and Business, SE 4a & 4b

  • Level 2, 627, 2 ½ credits
  • Level 3, 637, 2 ½ credits

This course exposes students to how the world of business relates to them personally. Major topics will include budgeting your paycheck, basic checking and savings accounts, the importance of insurance, the appropriate use of credit, bank services, and short and long term savings investing. Students can expect to learn how to: plan their personal finances (career planning, money management, and financial planning), map strategies for investing their financial resources (fundamentals of investing stocks, bonds and mutual funds), protect their finances (tax strategies, insurance) and comprehend banking and credit. The premise of this course is that citizens cannot be financially savvy unless they are educated about the business environment and strategies available to them. Students will also gain first-hand experience in saving and investing by participating in the Stock Market Game.

If a student has successfully completed Algebra 2, this course can be counted as a one semester mathematics course.

Grades 10, 11, 12

Sports and Entertainment Marketing, SE 2 & 3

  • Level 2, 624, 2 ½ credits

This course will take the student on a step-by-step journey through the world of marketing. Students will learn the basic functions of marketing and how those functions are applied to sports and entertainment. Marketing is the tool that has allowed the United States’ economy to become one of the most successful in the world. Sports and entertainment are important parts of our modern economy. Fans and companies spend billions of dollars each year on sports. Entertainment is one of the largest exports of the United States to the rest of the world. Students will learn how to determine the target markets for certain products and how to develop strategies to appeal to the target markets. Topics covered include: entrepreneurship, marketing practices, merchandising, retailing, advertising and inventory control.

Grades 11, 12

Sports and Entertainment Marketing II, SE 4c & 4d

  • Level 2, 625, 2 ½ credits

Students in the Advanced Marketing course will further develop their skills and knowledge of marketing. The students will create a school event and be responsible for marketing it to the student body. They will look into developing new merchandise promotions and advertising for the school store. Students will increase their knowledge of market research through developing as well as participating in focus groups and surveys. Students will build on their understanding with advanced applications of marketing such as Visual Merchandising, Displays and Essential Elements of Advertising. Students will also explore “real life” marketing jobs in all industries, but especially the Sports and Entertainment marketing industry.

Prerequisite: Sports and Entertainment Marketing

Health & Wellness

The Health and Wellness department aligns it’s curriculum with the Massachusetts Comprehensive Health Curriculum Framework. The goal of the department is to encourage students to develop active lifestyles for overall health benefits. This will enable students to develop to their fullest potential through the acquisition of daily living skills and the behaviors necessary to make good decisions in life. Through a diversified Physical Education program students are encouraged to develop skills and positive attitudes toward lifelong participation in exercise. Physical Education is a graduation requirement for all four years. The Health Education program offers freshmen health and electives for 10th, 11th, and 12th grade students.

Grade 9

Physical Education, SE 2 & 3

  • 2 credits

Freshmen will automatically be scheduled for physical education. The ninth grade Physical Education program has students explore team and individual sports, fitness, orienteering, and recreational and cooperative activities that encourage students to develop skills and positive attitudes toward lifelong participation in exercise. In addition, during the ninth grade a Fitness Center orientation program is included. This center is also available after school for student use. All students will take part in physical education class for two periods in each seven day cycle for the entire year unless excused by a physician.

Grade 10

Physical Education, SE 4a & 4b

  • 2 credits

Sophomore students are presented with a variety of team, individual and lifetime activities. Students will continue to build on the concepts and knowledge learned in the previous year. Daily participation will also include flexibility exercises, abdominal work, and upper body strengthening and cardio fitness. An important objective of the Grade 10 program is to give students the background for entering the selection program in the junior and senior years.All students will take part in physical education class for two periods in each seven day cycle for the entire year unless excused by a physician.

Grades 11 & 12

Physical Education, SE 1 & 5

  • 2 credits

Junior and Senior students have an opportunity to select from a variety of activities/sports over 4 terms. Each term students will select a different activity/sport. Offerings include team sports, recreational games such as; shuffle board, horse shoes, croquet, and bocce, as well as the following lifetime activities: weight training, yoga, table tennis, tennis, golf, badminton, archery, fitness walking, lifetime fitness planning, AED, First Aid and CPR infant, Child and Adult. All students will take part in physical education class for two periods in each seven day cycle for the entire year unless excused by a physician. Below is an explanation of what activities/sports are offered. (Activities/Sports offered each term will be dependent upon weather and court/space availability.)

  • Team Sports - Basketball ~ This course is designed to review the fundamentals of basketball. Various drills will be utilized to teach students both offensive and defensive skills leading up to game scrimmaging. Offensive skills included are: jump shooting, movement passing, dribbling with both hands and ball handling. Defensive skills included are: body position, advanced footwork and court awareness. The rules of basketball will also be covered as well as the strategy of the game.
  • Team Sports - Flag Football ~ This course is designed to review the skills of flag football, including passing, catching, route running, and defending. A series of skill-specific challenges will lead up to small and large team play. The rules of flag football will also be covered as well as the strategies of the game.
  • Team Sports – Lacrosse ~ This course is designed to review the skills of lacrosse including throwing, catching, ground balls, cradling and shooting. Small-sided games will be practiced to incorporate these skills to lead up to a game. The rules of lacrosse will also be covered as well as the strategies of the game.
  • Team Sports - Soccer ~ This course is designed to review the skills of soccer, including dribbling, passing and receiving, heading, shooting and finishing, and defending, as well as small group tactics. Small-sided games will be practiced to incorporate these skills to lead up to a game. The rules of soccer will also be covered as well as the strategies of the game.
  • Team Sports ~ Ultimate Frisbee ~ This course is designed to review the fundamental skills and strategies of organized ultimate frisbee, including throwing, passing, catching, running, cutting and marking. In addition, students will gain an understanding of personal strategies in offense and defense. Students will also learn to practice effective communication with teammates.
  • Team Sports – Volleyball ~ This course is designed to review techniques for serving, passing, setting and spiking. Small-sided games will be practiced to incorporate these skills to a lead up to a game. Game play stresses teamwork and competition, providing a functional knowledge of rules, regulations, safety procedures and skills of the sport.
  • Lifetime Sport Recreational Games ~ This course is noncompetitive and is designed to enhance the student’s physical fitness through participation in various recreational games. For example, shuffle board, horse shoes, croquet, and bocce. Emphasis will be placed on learning the rules, etiquette, scoring and history.
  • Lifetime Sport Archery ~ This course is designed to teach students the basic skills and knowledge of archery. Emphasis will be placed on learning how to take care of the equipment, scoring, terminology, the art of shooting, stance, draw, anchor, release and follow through, clout and field shooting and aiming with point of aim and sight.
  • Lifetime Sport Badminton ~ This course is designed to teach students the skills and knowledge of badminton. Emphasis will be placed on learning the basic skills such as serves, clears, drives, the drop shot, the smash and net shots, rules and strategy for doubles and singles, terminology, and an understanding of the history of the sport.
  • Lifetime Sport Lifetime Fitness Planning ~ This course is designed for the motivated student who is interested in making a difference in their fitness level. A personal fitness plan will be designed with input from the teacher and closely monitored for progress. Students should plan to workout vigorously for the entire class period. Fitness plans will be customized for each student’s short and long term goals, i.e. weight management, overall conditioning for health, sports specific training, muscle strength and conditioning, or increasing cardiovascular endurance.
  • Lifetime Sport Fitness Walking ~ This course is designed to teach students the basic walking techniques and principles with the goal for students to develop and implement an individualized conditioning program for themselves.
  • Lifetime Sport – First Aid/CPR Infant, Child & Adult/AED ~ This course is designed to teach students about standard first aid, how to perform C.P.R. and how to use an automatic external defibrillator. They will be eligible for an American Heart Association certification in these areas. These certifications are required for many jobs, including lifeguard, camp counselor, day-care worker and are also valued by many companies.
  • Lifetime Sport Golf ~ This course is designed to teach students the skills and knowledge of golf. Emphasis will be placed on learning the basic grips, stances, chips, putts, full swings, sand shots and club selection. Irons are used to develop the rhythm and timing of the swing. Also included are terminology, etiquette, scoring, pace of play and golf safety.
  • Lifetime Sport Table Tennis ~ This course is designed to teach students the skills and knowledge of table tennis. Emphasis will be placed on learning the general knowledge of equipment, rules, and basic strokes, including topspin drive, backspin chop, and simple block in both forehand and backhand. Drills on the fundamentals will lead to competitive play for singles and doubles. Table tennis rules, scoring and etiquette are also emphasized.
  • Lifetime Sport Tennis ~ This course is designed to teach students the skills and knowledge of tennis. Emphasis will be placed on learning the basic strokes, grips, stances, hitting positions, racquet-face control, forehand, backhand, serve and serve return. Drills on the fundamentals will lead to competitive play for singles and doubles. Basic tennis rules, scoring and etiquette are also emphasized.
  • Lifetime Sport Weight Training ~ This course is designed for active participation in a strength and conditioning program designed for individual skill levels and desired effect. Emphasis will be placed on learning how muscles work, how they grow, the nutrition they need to propel growth, terminology and how to safely exercise using the proper form and technique.
  • Lifetime Sport Yoga ~ This course is designed to teach students about yoga. It is a noncompetitive activity designed to reduce stress for improved health of body and mind, while increasing flexibility, strength, stamina and reducing the chance of athletic injury.
  • Outdoor Snowshoeing ~ This course is designed to teach students about snowshoeing. Emphasis will be placed on learning about winter safety, snowshoe history, equipment selection, care, use, navigation and the history of snowshoeing.

Grade 9

Health Education, SE 1 & 5

  • 049, 1 credit

Freshman will automatically be scheduled for health education. This course will meet two days each cycle for one semester. This skill based course offers numerous opportunities for building personal, social and life skills. The curriculum is designed to aid the student in transitioning to the rigors and pressures of high school. Through the skills students will learn how to set goals, analyze influences, make decisions, access valid and reliable information and communicate. Content that will be infused into the skills will be the dimensions of wellness, stress, stress management, substance use, relationships, bullying and cyber-bullying. Parents/guardians who do not wish to have their daughter/son enrolled in health education must notify the Headmaster’s office in writing during the programming cycle.

Grades 10, 11, 12

Contemporary Health Issues, SE 4a & 4b

  • 823, 2 ½ credits

This course is designed to broaden the student’s understanding of wellness issues and its relevance to their personal lives. Discussions and guided activities will be used to discuss the evaluation of health information, balancing stress, healthy food choices, depression and suicide, body image and eating disorders, abstinence, reproduction and birth, sexual harassment, bullying and cyber-bullying, alcohol and other drug misuse.

Grades 11, 12

Nutrition and Fitness, SE 2 & 3

  • 822, 2 ½ credits

Nutrition and Fitness emphasizes the critical role eating a nutritious diet plays in overall health. It also stresses the importance of including physical activity in daily routines. Units of study include sources and functions of nutrients, food preparation activities, weight management, eating disorders, global hunger consumer issues, and careers. Students will participate in fitness activities and will learn to control their state of wellness through the decisions they make.

Grades 10, 11, 12

Human Development and Parenting, SE 4c & 4d

  • Level 2, 821, 2 ½ credits

This course focuses on the issues of child development, adolescence, interpersonal relationships, human sexuality, abstinence, sexually transmitted infections, pregnancy, birth, family, and positive decision making. Included are many contemporary issues that concern the adolescent. Students are provided with forthright information concerning their physical health and well-being. The course aims to improve decision making, advocate for positive health practices, and help students make responsible choices regarding their health and well being.

Full Year Courses

Early Childhood Education (Preschool Lab Program)

The Early Childhood Education (Preschool) Laboratory Program at Braintree High School provides an opportunity for 11th and 12th grade students to experience the exciting and rewarding challenge of working with and studying about children. Students learn and practice theory and methods of teaching while working in our on-site preschool. Upon successful completion of the Preschool Laboratory 1 and Preschool Laboratory 2 courses, a 12th grade student will be eligible for Preschool Certification from the Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care.

Grades 11, 12

Early Childhood Education Preschool Laboratory 1, SE 4c & 4d

  • Level 2, 820, 5 credits

Preschool Laboratory I is a year-long course open to high school juniors and seniors with an interest and fondness for children. It is designed to offer a hands-on opportunity to study child development while working with children in our on-site preschool program. In addition to studying child development students learn about curriculum development, plan and teach lessons, develop learning materials, assist in the preparation of the classroom, and develop a repertoire of strategies for managing young children. Students interested in pursuing careers in education or health are particularly encouraged to enroll in this course.

Grade 12

Early Childhood Education Preschool Laboratory 2, SE 4c & 4d

  • Level 2, 825, 5 credits
Preschool Laboratory 2 is a year-long course open to high school seniors who have successfully completed Preschool Laboratory I. The course has been designed to provide a more in-depth exploration into the fields of Early Childhood Education and other child related services. Through their class and preschool activities, students will develop an increased understanding of child development, educational psychology, educational practices and developmentally appropriate preschool activities. There is an increased emphasis on teamwork, time management and effective communication. Students who maintain a C or better average in Preschool Lab 2 are qualified to apply for certification as a preschool teacher through the Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care.

Art and Design

The Art and Design Department offers courses which will provide a sequential program of experiences, culminating in Advance Placement Studio Art and/or PORTFOLIO, which will enable the future artist or designer to pursue post-secondary education in art or to continue making quality art as an avocation. In addition, a wide selection of art and design courses is available for those students who would like to explore various aspects of 3D ARTS, FINE ARTS, DESIGN and MEDIA in greater depth.

Any full year course or two semester courses fulfills the one unit of creative or applied arts which is required for graduation.

Full Year Courses

Grade 11, 12

AP Studio Art in one of the following three areas: Drawing and Painting, 2D Design or 3D Design, SE 1 & 5

  • Level 1, 710, 5 credits

The Advanced Placement Studio Art course is for serious art students who wish to study Visual Art in greater depth. Students who elect this course should be prepared to do the work of a freshman in college. This course is part of a national program run by the College Entrance Examination Board and is recognized by most colleges and art schools. It offers students the opportunity to gain three hours of college credit or advanced standing in one of the following categories:

  • Drawing/Painting Portfolio: this includes a broad interpretation of drawing, painting and printmaking issues.
  • Two-Dimensional Design Portfolio; this is intended to address elements and principles of design interpreted two-dimensionally in a variety of Media.
  • Three-Dimensional Design Portfolio: this is intended to address elements and principles of design interpreted three-dimensionally in a variety of Media.

Approximately 24 art works, part of which must be based on a theme, are expected from AP students. This art work is sent to the College Board in May. Students who enroll in this course must have recommendations of their current art teacher and the Director of Art. Students must understand that they will be required to put in 4 to 6 hours of outside class time per week completing their portfolio, maintaining a sketchbook, visiting galleries, researching, and presenting information on artists and art ideas.

Prerequisites for the AP Studio Art course: a C average in the pre-requisite course, FINE ARTS 2, 3D 2, DESIGN 2 or MEDIA 2 and the Art Director’s written approval.

Semester Courses

Grade 9 Semester 1 and 2

Freshman Foundations, SE 4a & 4b

  • 720, 2 ½ credits

This is a foundations course, offering freshmen the opportunity for self-expression and exploration in many materials and media, breadth not depth. Emphasis will be placed upon the effective use of the elements and principles of DESIGN to convey a point of view, a sense of space, or a mood. Students will demonstrate their powers of observation, abstraction, invention, and expression in the four concentrations: 3D, FINE ARTS, DESIGN and MEDIA. Students will learn the creative process of draft, critique, self-assess, refine and exhibit. They will also describe and analyze their own work and the work of others with appropriate visual art vocabulary. Students will be encouraged to view art within its historic context and its connections to other subject areas. Students are expected to complete one or two homework assignments per term.

Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 1 and 2

Studio

  • 722, 2 ½ credits

STUDIO is a semester long course ideal for the student who would like to “try out” before dedicating a whole semester to one area of concentration. Students will explore the four creative areas of art and DESIGN: 3D, FINE ARTS, DESIGN and MEDIA. Emphasis will be placed upon individual expression and finding a student’s passion and creative strengths. Exploring ideas, concepts and creative problem solving will be practiced on a daily basis. Students will be engaged in skills and problems that tap into creative content not experienced before. The semester will be divided into the 4 creative areas. Students will develop the creative process of draft, critique, self-assessment, refinement and exhibition.

Grade 11, 12 Semester 1 and 2

Portfolio, SE 1 & 5

  • 723, 2 ½ credits

This is a combined class for all 4 areas of concentration: 3D, Fine Arts, Design and Media. This course is for serious art students who have completed I and 2 of one area of concentration. (Pre-requisite of a C average in 3D 2, Fine Arts 2, Design 2 or Media 2). This course is intended for students who wish to compile a portfolio for an art school or college. Students will create a new body of work to expand upon the work created in the pre-requisite classes. The course offers high school credit only and is not associated with the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program. Students will complete and digitally photograph work for college portfolio entrance requirements. Beyond the scheduled classes, students are expected to do independent project work, keep a journal of ideas and sketches, visit galleries, art schools and colleges, research and present information on artists and art movements once per semester. A sketchbook/journal and independent work beyond scheduled class is expected. Students will complete the year with a public exhibition of their work.

Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 1 and 2

Fine Arts 1, SE 2 & 3

  • 731, 2 ½ credits

This semester course gives students an opportunity to broaden their art expression through the medium of drawing, painting, printmaking and illustration. Students will learn to manipulate the basic elements of art (line, shape, texture, form, and color) using the principles of design (balance, emphasis, contrast, pattern, value, etc.) in their drawings to communicate a point of view, a sense of space or a mood. Many materials will be used including pencil, pen, charcoal, pastel watercolors, inks and tempera paint. Students will learn the creative process of draft, critique, self-assess, refine and exhibit. They will also describe and analyze their own work and the work of others with appropriate visual art vocabulary. Students will be encouraged to view art within its historic context and its connections to other subject areas. Students are required to purchase a sketchbook, to do weekly assignments and preliminary drafts for projects.

A minimum of a C average in this class is required to enroll in the Fine Arts 2 course.

Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 1 and 2

Fine Arts 2, SE 4c & 4d

  • 732, 2 ½ credits

This course builds upon the skills taught in Fine Arts 1 (prerequisite of a C average in Fine Arts 1) and provides opportunities for students to express ideas with a greater mastery of materials and techniques. Emphasis will be on the rendering of original ideas from observation and imagination. Students are required to purchase a sketchbook, to do weekly assignments as well as preliminary project drafts within.

Prerequisites of a C in this course, teacher recommendation and approval by the director of art are required to enroll in the Portfolio course and in the AP Studio Art courses.

Grades 11, 12 Semester 1 and 2

Fine Arts 3, SE 4c & 4d

  • 733, 2 ½ credits

This course is for the serious art student and builds upon the skills taught in FINE ARTS 2 (prerequisite of a B average in FINE ARTS 2) and provides opportunities for students to express ideas with a greater mastery of materials and techniques. Emphasis will be on the rendering of original ideas from observation and imagination. Students are required to purchase a sketchbook, to do weekly assignments as well as preliminary project drafts within.

Prerequisites of a C in this course, teacher recommendation and approval by the director of art are required to enroll in the PORTFOLIO course and in the AP Studio Art courses.

Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 1 and 2

Design I, SE 2 & 3

  • 725, 2 ½ credits

In this introductory course students will learn basic design skills and explore different professions of the design field. Utilizing the elements and principles of design, working in the programs in Adobe CS, students in this course develop an understanding of the various organizational possibilities available in designing for the flat surface. The development of ideas, problem-solving skills, building a design vocabulary and foundation, and knowledge of the program Adobe Illustrator are the focus of this course.

A minimum of a C average in this class is required to enroll in DESIGN 2.

Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 1 and 2

Design 2, SE 4c & 4d

  • 726, 2 ½ credits

In this one semester course students will expand their previously learned design skills from DESIGN 1 (prerequisite of a C average in DESIGN 1), delving into the history of design and continuing to focus on the elements and principles of design. Students will use the latest professional design programs in Adobe CS. Hands-on projects will be created in true to life situations. Design and layout, advertising, fashion, interior design, corporate identity and computer generated illustrations are a few of the possible areas explored.

Prerequisites of a C in this course, teacher recommendation and approval by the director of art are required to enroll in the DESIGN 3 course and in the AP Studio Art courses.

Grades 11, 12 Semester 1 and 2

Design 3, SE 4c & 4d

  • 727, 2 ½ credits

This course is for serious art students who will expand their previously learned skills from DESIGN 2 (prerequisite of a B average in DESIGN 2). Students begin a concentration in a target area and create design projects which expand learning skills and potential possibilities for portfolio entries. Hands-on projects will be created in true to life situations. Prerequisites of a C in this course, teacher recommendation and approval by the director of art are required to enroll in Portfolio and in the AP Studio Art courses.

Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 1 and 2

Media I, SE 2 & 3

  • 728, 2 ½ credits

In this semester course students will learn and explore the vast areas of media arts field. Students will explore the creative use of black and white and color photography using traditional darkroom processes and contemporary digital imaging software. Students will develop their visual communication skills through weekly shooting assignments that include subjects like: portraiture, abstractions and landscapes. Other lessons will include: black and white printing, history of photography and imaging technology, master photographers and basic Adobe PhotoShop. STUDENTS MUST HAVE ACCESS TO A SMARTPHONE WITH CAMERA OR DIGITAL CAMERA FOR THIS COURSE. A minimum of a C average is required in this class to enroll in MEDIA 2.

Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 1 and 2

Media 2, SE 4c & 4d

  • 729, 2 ½ credits

In this one semester course students will build upon prior knowledge from MEDIA 1 (prerequisite of a C average in MEDIA 1). Advanced darkroom techniques and Adobe PhotoShop software will be used to create artworks of personal expression. Lessons will include: color and communication, photography and history, visual communication and mass culture, and mixed MEDIA that combines photographic technologies and drawing. STUDENTS MUST HAVE ACCESS TO A SMARTPHONE WITH CAMERA OR DIGITAL CAMERA FOR THIS COURSE. Prerequisites of a C in this course, teacher recommendation and approval by the director of art are required to enroll in the PORTFOLIO and or the AP Studio Art courses.

Grades 11, 12 Semester 1 and 2

Media 3, SE 4c & 4d

  • 730, 2 ½ credits

This one semester course is for the serious art student who will expand their previously learned skills from MEDIA 2 (prerequisite of a B average in MEDIA 2). Students begin a concentration in a target area and create design projects which expand learning skills and potential possibilities for portfolio entries. Hands-on projects will be created in true to life situations.. STUDENTS MUST HAVE ACCESS TO A SMARTPHONE WITH CAMERA OR DIGITAL CAMERA FOR THIS COURSE. Prerequisites of a C in this course, teacher recommendation and approval by the director of art are required to enroll in PORTFOLIO and in the AP Studio Art courses

Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 1 and 2

3D 1, SE 2 & 3

  • 735, 2 ½ credits

This course is an introduction to the basic 3-dimensional design experiences. Students will learn additive and reductive techniques. They will work with clay, plaster, wood, paper, plastics, metal and other materials, learning technical skills as well as creative expression. They will learn to identify and use the elements and principles of 3-dimensional design.

Prerequisite in this class of a C is required to enroll in the 3D 2 course.

Grades 10, 11, 12 Semester 1 and 2

3D 2, SE 4c & 4d

  • 736, 2 ½ credits

This course builds on the basic knowledge and techniques of 3D 1 (prerequisite of a C average in the 3D 1). Students will build skill levels with various techniques while learning to develop their artistic expression in 3-D. They will become more fluent in the use and identification of the elements and principles of 3-dimensional design through learning how to critique their own and other’s work. They will construct works that are expressive, functional and conceptual. Students will complete one written research assignment coupled with a class presentation.

Prerequisites of a C in this course, teacher recommendation and approval by the director of art are required to enroll in the 3D 3 course and in the AP Studio Art courses.

Grade 11, 12 Semester 1 and 2

3D 3, SE 1 & 5

  • 724, 2 ½ credits

This one semester course is for the serious art student who will explore their previously learned skills from 3D2 (prerequisite of a B average in 3D2). Students begin a concentration in a target area and create projects which expand learning skills and potential possibilities for portfolio entries. Prerequisites of a C in this course, teacher recommendation and approval by the director of art are required to enroll in Portfolio and in the AP Studio Art courses.

Music

The Music Department offers a variety of full year and semester courses, which are designed to meet the needs and varied interests of our students. Participation in and knowledge of music enables the individual to develop an awareness of self in the cultural continuum by uniquely engaging the senses in communication skills, perception, expression, and creativity. A full-year course or two semester courses fulfills the one unit of creative or applied arts credit needed for graduation.

Full Year Courses

Advanced Placement Music Theory, SE 2 & 3

  • Grade 12
  • 750, 5 credits

The AP Music Theory course develops a student’s ability to recognize, understand, and describe the basic materials and processes of music that are heard or presented in a score. The achievement of this goal will be promoted by integrated approaches to the student’s development of aural, sight-singing, written, compositional, and analytical skills through listening, performance, writing, creative and analytical exercises. This course is offered to seniors. It would be beneficial for the student to take private lessons on an instrument, Music Technology I & II, and to be a member of a performing ensemble at the high school. This course is part of a national program run by the College Entrance Examination Board.

Concert Band, SE 1 & 5

  • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
  • 760, 5 credits

The Concert Band is an intermediate level instrumental ensemble open to grades 9-12. The ensemble performs a wide variety of concert repertoire. Students taking this course will be expected to perform at school events including concerts and football games.

Wind Ensemble, SE 1 & 5

  • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
  • 761, 5 credits

The Wind Ensemble is an advanced instrumental ensemble open to interested wind players and percussionists in grades 9-12. Participation in the Wind Ensemble is determined by audition and recommendation of the Band Director. Students taking this course will be expected to perform at school events including concerts and football games. It is recommended that students selected for participation in this course also take private instrumental lessons.

Orchestra, SE 1 & 5

  • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
  • 765, 5 credits

Orchestra is a continuation of middle school study, exploring string literature and techniques from the Baroque through Modern Day. This ensemble is open to all grades and requires no audition. Attendance at all performances is required.

Chamber Orchestra, SE 1 & 5

  • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
  • 766, 5 credits

Chamber Orchestra is an auditioned ensemble that will explore advanced string literature and techniques from the Baroque to Modern Day. This ensemble is open to all students upon completion of a successful audition in May of the current school year. Rising 9th grade musicians will be allowed to audition by recommendation of their middle school instructor. Attendance at all performances is required.

Chorus, SE 1 & 5

  • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
  • 763, 5 credits

Chorus is a performance class designed to offer students experience in singing a varied repertoire of choral literature. Students are expected to participate in all scheduled performances.

Concert Choir, SE 4c & 4d

  • Grades 10, 11, 12
  • 764, 5 credits

Concert choir is a select group chosen by audition and recognized as an outstanding choral group. The singers perform a varied repertoire at many concerts throughout the year. Students are expected to participate in all scheduled performances. Students must take one year of Chorus prior to audition for Concert Choir.

Independent Study in Music (Meets daily), SE 2 & 3

  • 772, 5 credits

Independent Study is available for students who have extreme scheduling conflicts. Students must obtain the consent of the teacher and the Director of Music.

Semester Courses

Music Technology I, SE 4a & 4b

  • Grades 10, 11, 12
  • 781, 2 ½ credits

This course is a hands-on introduction to accessing musical information through technology. Designed for students who want to understand, explore and create music through the use of electronic synthesizers, computers and current music software. No prior computer knowledge is required. This course meets the Computer graduation requirement.

Music Technology II, SE 4a & 4b

  • Grades 10, 11, 12
  • 782, 2 ½ credits

This course is an extension of the activities and topics covered in Music Tech I. There will be an increased emphasis on using music technology in the creation and production of original compositions and soundtracks. This course meets the computer graduation requirement

Electronic Piano I, SE 4a & 4b

  • Grades 9, 10, 11, 12
  • 784, 2 ½ credits

This course is for anyone interested in learning to play a keyboard instrument. No prior knowledge or experience is required. Students will learn the techniques of piano playing and explore the basic rudiments of music. Students will explore a variety of musical styles, harmonize tunes, improvise and create music.

Electronic Piano II, SE 4a & 4b

  • Grades 10, 11, 12
  • 785, 2 ½ credits

This course is a continuation of Electronic Piano I. It is designed for students who wish to further explore keyboard performance and/or composition. An in-depth experience in the ability to sight read music, comprehend key and meter signatures, harmonic changes and rhythm patterns will be explored through carefully selected materials that meet the students’ interest and abilities.

Independent Study in Music (Meets 3 times/cycle), SE 2 & 3

  • 771, 2 ½ credits

Independent Study is available for students who have extreme scheduling conflicts. Students must obtain the consent of the teacher and the Director of Music.

Support Services

Courses associated with these support services specifically address school-wide expectations 1 & 5.

Achieve

Achieve is an academic and emotional support program for students in Grades 9-12 who have been, or are at risk of, underperforming academically, or would benefit from additional structure and support during their school day. Students take part in all core academics, including the opportunity to attend mainstream classes, and enroll in college courses through the Dual Enrollment Program. Additional academic and emotional supports are available throughout the day, including twice daily school meetings. The goal is to improve academic performance and social well-being by addressing the individual needs of students through support, intervention, and feedback from staff and peers.

Alliance

Alliance is a voluntary program for students in Grades 9-12 who have underperformed, or have been identified as at-risk of underperformance, in the mainstream due to any number of factors, including, but not limited to, attendance, motivation, Behavioral issues and difficulty accessing the curriculum. Alliance is an Early College High School, which allows qualified students to concurrently earn high school and college credits through the Duel Enrollment Program. Students also have the opportunity to earn privileges and are held accountable through the Level System and peer feedback in twice daily school meetings. One of the goals of the program is that students internalize positive behaviors, such as responsibility, time management, and independence, as they prepare to transition to college, trade schools, the military or careers.

Career Exploration

Career Exploration is a program for students in Grades 11-12 transitioning from Language Enrichment, or who realize the benefits of career exploration and immersion. The program is designed to facilitate students in completing their graduation requirements while also participating in an innovative curriculum that includes classroom instruction as well as the opportunity to explore career paths via vocational Dual Enrollment courses, internships in the community, service learning projects, field trips and job shadowing. The goal of the program is to help students understand the steps needed to pursue their chosen career path and the resources needed to begin to take these steps.

Language Enrichment

Language Enrichment is a program for students in Grades 9-12 with language-based learning disabilities whose cognition falls within the average to below average range. Student may also demonstrate disorders in receptive and/or expressive language, language processions and executive functioning disorders. Language Enrichment is a substantially separate program in which students work toward completing their graduation requirements and passing MCAS by receiving systematic instruction in small groups provided by special education teachers. Every effort is made to include students in regular education classes when appropriate. Speech and language services are embedded within the classroom setting and provided as a pull-out service on an individual basis. The goal of Language Enrichment is to enhance grade level academic skills while remediating gaps in learning and providing social skills, learning strategies, and social tools to become independent learners and to achieve success in all aspects of their adolescent lives in and out of school.

COAST (Communication, Organization and Academic Support Training)

COAST is a program for students in Grades 9-12 who generally exhibit social anxiety, organizational challenges and learning issues associated with ASD. Students generally experience difficulty with interpersonal and pragmatic communication with peers and within the community. COAST is an extension of the Learning Center and a fully mainstreamed program with additional social and emotional supports. The program has one block of social pragmatics, organizational skills, adaptive physical education and/or life skills. The goal of COAST is to provide students with the opportunity to remain in their mainstream classes and develop social thinking skills, pragmatic language skills, participate in adaptive physical education (if needed), improve community inclusion strategies, and enhance organizational skills.

Compass

Compass is an academic support program for mainstream students in Grades 9-12 who require additional academic, social, emotional and/or behavioral support in a structured environment. Students in Compass follow rigorous mainstream schedules with at least one period of support in the program, in lieu of Learning Center, to receive academic support and address their individual needs. The program guides students to establish routines, develop strategies, and foster positive relationships with increased independence in order to reach their full potential in their mainstream courses.

Learning Center

Learning Center is an academic support for mainstream students in Grades 9-12 who are on an IEP or have an active 504 plan. The goal of learning center is to address the students’ needs as outlined in their IEP and provide support to mainstream teachers as they accommodate these needs.

PMI

PMI is a program for students in Grades 9-12 who are unable to attend school during the traditional school day. PMI offers students a chance to gain or recover credits beyond what is offered during the traditional school day. Many of the students in the program suffer from social anxiety or other medical ailments that make it difficult or impossible for them to attend a traditional seven hour school day. Students have the opportunity to earn additional credits for employment, and, when appropriate, are eligible to participate in Dual Enrollment courses. While the primary goal of PMI is to provide the students who cannot otherwise attend school a way to earn credits toward their diploma, it has also been used by students for credit recovery in addition to their day school schedule.

Project PROVE

Project PROVE is a program for students in Grades 9-12 who exhibit significant intellectual disabilities. In PROVE, students are provided with the functional academics, inclusion opportunities and vocational training experiences necessary to be successful in life and continue to become a contributing member of their community.

STRIVES

STRIVES is a support program for students in Grades 9-12 who are classified under the disability of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Students take part in all core academics and have the opportunity for vocational training when appropriate. Inclusion opportunities are based upon the student’s areas of strength and need. STRIVES includes a social skills component to enhance social awareness.

Home Instruction and Tutoring

Home Instruction and Tutoring is a program for students in Grades 9-12 who are unable to attend school for fourteen days or longer due to a medical or emotional disability. The main goal of the program is to provide the student with the curriculum they have missed while out, as well as to keep them current so they may more easily re-enter their classes when appropriate. This program is primarily designed to be a short term placement, with the expressed goal of returning students to their classes.

WAVE

WAVE is a program for student in Grades 9-12 who exhibit significant intellectual deficits. Students receive their ELA, Social Studies, Science and Math instruction from WAVE special educators in a sub separate small group setting, and, when appropriate, are included in mainstream classes supported by WAVE staff. The goal is to provide the supports needed so that students can access the curriculum at their own paces and levels.

Guidelines for Selecting Courses

English

Full Year

Grade 9

110 Adv. Hon. Eng. 9, 5 credits

120 Honors English 9, 5 credits

130 CP English 9, 5 credits

140 English 9, 5 credits

Grade 10

111 Adv. Hon. Eng. 10, 5 credits

121 Honors English 10, 5 credits

131 CP English 10, 5 credits

142 English 10, 5 credits

Grade 11

114 AP English Lang , 5 credits

125 Honors Writing/Lit. , 5 credits

135 CP Writing/Literature, 5 credits

145 Writing/Literature, 5 credits

Grade 12

114 AP English Lang. , 5 credits

124 Honors Lit & Identity, 5 credits

134 CP Lit & Identity, 5 credits

126 Honors Creative Writing/Lit, 5 credits

136 CP Creative Writing/Lit, 5 credits

Semester

Grade 9

164 Intro to TV & Video, 2 ½ credits

Grade 10

164 Intro to TV & Video, 2 ½ credits

165 Broadcast Journalism 1, 2 ½ credits

166 Broadcast Journalism 2, 2 ½ credits

167 Broadcast Journalism 3, 2 ½ credits

109 ELA Strategies, 1 ¼ credits

Grade 11

164 Intro to TV & Video, 2 ½ credits

165 Broadcast Journalism 1, 2 ½ credits

166 Broadcast Journalism 2, 2 ½ credits

167 Broadcast Journalism 3, 2 ½ credits

168 Broadcast Journalism 4, 2 ½ credits

109 ELA Strategies, 1 ¼ credits

132 SAT Lab, 1 credit

Grade 12

164 Intro to TV & Video, 2 ½ credits

165 Broadcast Journalism 1, 2 ½ credits

166 Broadcast Journalism 2, 2 ½ credits

167 Broadcast Journalism 3, 2 ½ credits

168 Broadcast Journalism 4, 2 ½ credits

169 Broadcast Journalism 5, 2 ½ credits



Mathematics

Full Year

Grade 9

410 Adv. Honors Geometry, 5 credits

420 Honors Geometry, 5 credits

430 College Prep Geometry, 5 credits

431 Geometry, 5 credits

Grade 10

411 Adv Hon Alg. 1 & 2, 5 credits

417 AP Comp Sci Principles, 5 credits

421 Honors Algebra 1 & 2, 5 credits

426 H. Comp Sci. Principles, 5 credits

432 College Prep Algebra 1, 5 credits

433 Algebra 1, 5 credits

Grade 11

412 Adv. Hon. Alg. 2/Pre-Calculus, 5 credits

415 AP Statistics, 5 credits

416 AP Computer Science, 5 credits

417 AP CompSci Principles, 5 credits

422 Hon. Alg. 2/Pre-Calculus, 5 credits

426 H. CompSci. Principles, 5 credits

434 College Prep Algebra 2, 5 credits

435 Algebra 2, 5 credits

Grade 12

413 AP Calculus BC, 5 credits

414 AP Calculus AB, 5 credits

415 AP Statistics, 5 credits

416 AP Computer Science, 5 credits

417 AP Comp Sci Principles, 5 credits

423 Honors Calculus, 5 credits

424 Honors Statistics, 5 credits

426 H. Comp Sci. Principles, 5 credits

436 College Prep Pre-Calculus, 5 credits

438 College Prep Statistics, 5 credits

Semester

Grade 9

427 Exploring CompSci, 2 ½ credits

Grade 10

427 Exploring CompSci, 2 ½ credits

428 Student Technician, 1 ½ credits

Grade 11

132 SAT Lab, 1 credit

427 Exploring Comp Sci, 2 ½ credits

428 Student Technician, 1 ½ credits

Grade 12

427 Exploring Comp Sci, 2 ½ credits

428 Student Technician, 1 ½ credits

464 Math Tutor, 3 credits



Social Studies

Full Year

Grade 9

210 History of West & US Govt, 5 credits

220 History of West & Govt, 5 credits

230 History of West & Govt, 5 credits

240 History of West & Govt, 5 credits

Grade 10

211 Modern World History, 5 credits

214 AP European History, 5 credits

215 AP Human Geography, 5 credits

221 Modern World History, 5 credits

231 Modern World History, 5 credits

241 Modern World History, 5 credits

Grade 11

212 AP US History, 5 credits

222 US History, 5 credits

232 US History, 5 credits

242 US History , 5 credits

217 History Capstone Project, 5 credits

219 History Capstone Project, 5 credits

250 Soul of A Nation, 5 credits

Grade 12

213 AP Govt. & Politics, 5 credits

214 AP European History, 5 credits

215 AP Human Geography, 5 credits

216 AP Psychology, 5 credits

217 History Capstone Project, 5 credits

219 History Capstone Project, 5 credits

250 Soul of A Nation, 5 credits

Semester

Grade 10

223 US Government, 2 ½ credits

233 US Government, 2 ½ credits

243 US Government, 2 ½ credits

227 Cont. Global Issues, 2 ½ credits

237 Cont. Global Issues, 2 ½ credits

247 Cont. Global Issues, 2 ½ credits

262 Public Speaking I, 2 ½ credits

263 Public Speaking II, 2 ½ credits

Grade 11

223 US Government, 2 ½ credits

233 US Government, 2 ½ credits

243 US Government, 2 ½ credits

225 Economics, 2 ½ credits

235 Economics, 2 ½ credits

245 Economics, 2 ½ credits

227 Cont. Global Issues, 2 ½ credits

237 Cont. Global Issues, 2 ½ credits

247 Cont. Global Issues, 2 ½ credits

228 History of US Sports, 2 ½ credits

238 History of US Sports, 2 ½ credits

248 History of US Sports, 2 ½ credits

262 Public Speaking I, 2 ½ credits

263 Public Speaking II, 2 ½ credits

251 Soul of A Nation, 2 ½ credits

Grade 12

223 US Government, 2 ½ credits

233 US Government, 2 ½ credits

243 US Government, 2 ½ credits

225 Economics, 2 ½ credits

235 Economics, 2 ½ credits

245 Economics, 2 ½ credits

226 Psychology, 2 ½ credits

236 Psychology, 2 ½ credits

246 Psychology, 2 ½ credits

227 Cont. Global Issues, 2 ½ credits

237 Cont. Global Issues, 2 ½ credits

247 Cont. Global Issues, 2 ½ credits

228 History of US Sports, 2 ½ credits

238 History of US Sports, 2 ½ credits

248 History of US Sports, 2 ½ credits

229 Sociology, 2 ½ credits

239 Sociology, 2 ½ credits

249 Sociology, 2 ½ credits

260 Intro to Cont. Law, 2 ½ credits

270 Intro to Cont. Law, 2 ½ credits

280 Intro to Cont. Law, 2 ½ credits

262 Public Speaking I, 2 ½ credits

263 Public Speaking II, 2 ½ credits

265 History of Braintree, 2 ½ credits

275 History of Braintree, 2 ½ credits

285 History of Braintree, 2 ½ credits

251 Soul of A Nation, 2 ½ credits



Science

Full Year

Grade 9

310 Adv. Honors Biology, 6 credits

320 Honors Biology, 6 credits

330 Introductory Physics, 6 credits

340 Physics, 6 credits

Grade 10

311 Adv. Honors Chemistry, 6 credits

316 AP Chemistry, 7 credits

322 Honors Chemistry, 6 credits

331 College Prep Biology, 6 credits

341 Biology, 6 credits

334 College Prep Physics, 6 credits

Grade 11

312 AP Physics 1, 7 credits

323 Honors Physics, 6 credits

332 College Prep Chemistry, 6 credits

342 Chemistry , 6 credits

334 College Prep Physics, 6 credits

Grade 12

314 AP Biology, 7 credits

315 AP Physics 2, 7 credits

316 AP Chemistry, 7 credits

317 AP Environ. Science, 7 credits

334 CP Physics, 6 credits

327 Honors Forensic Science, 5 credits

337 CP Forensic Science, 5 credits

324 Honors Human Anatomy & Physiology, 5 credits

335 CP Human Anatomy & Physiology, 5 credits

325 Honors Astronomy & Astrophysics, 5 credits

333 CP Astronomy & Astrophysics, 5 credits

326 Honors Princ. Of Engineering, 5 credits

339 College Princ. Of Engineering, 5 credits

Semester

Grade 10

336 Science Lab Asst., 1 credit

Grade 11

336 Science Lab Asst. , 1 credit

Grade 12

336 Science Lab Asst. , 1 credit



World Language

Grade 9

520 French 1, 5 credits

530 French 1, 5 credits

511 French 2, 5 credits

521 French 2, 5 credits

531 French 2, 5 credits

560 Spanish 1, 5 credits

570 Spanish 1, 5 credits

580 Spanish 1, 5 credits

551 Spanish 2, 5 credits

561 Spanish 2, 5 credits

Grade 10

511 French 2, 5 credits

521 French 2, 5 credits

531 French 2, 5 credits

512 French 3, 5 credits

522 French 3, 5 credits

532 French 3, 5 credits

551 Spanish 2, 5 credits

561 Spanish 2, 5 credits

571 Spanish 2, 5 credits

581 Spanish 2, 5 credits

552 Spanish 3, 5 credits

562 Spanish 3, 5 credits

572 Spanish 3, 5 credits

Grade 11

512 French 3, 5 credits

522 French 3, 5 credits

532 French 3, 5 credits

513 French 4, 5 credits

523 French 4, 5 credits

552 Spanish 3, 5 credits

562 Spanish 3, 5 credits

572 Spanish 3, 5 credits

553 Spanish 4, 5 credits

563 Spanish 4, 5 credits

Grade 12

513 French 4, 5 credits

523 French 4, 5 credits

514 French 5 AP, 5 credits

524 French 5, 5 credits

553 Spanish 4, 5 credits

563 Spanish 4, 5 credits

554 Spanish 5 AP, 5 credits

564 Spanish 5, 5 credits



Art & Design

Full Year

Grade 12

710 AP Studio Art, 5 credits

Semester

Grade 9

720 Freshman Foundations, 2 ½ credits

Grade 10

725 Design 1, 2 ½ credits

726 Design 2, 2 ½ credits

728 Media I, 2 ½ credits

729 Media 2, 2 ½ credits

731 Fine Art 1, 2 ½ credits

732 Fine Art 2, 2 ½ credits

735 3D 1, 2 ½ credits

736 3D 2, 2 ½ credits

722 Studio, 2 ½ credits

Grade 11

723 Portfolio, 2 ½ credits

725 Design 1, 2 ½ credits

726 Design 2, 2 ½ credits

727 Design 3 , 2 ½ credits

728 Media 1, 2 ½ credits

731 Media 2, 2 ½ credits

730 Media 3, 2 ½ credits

731 Fine Art 1, 2 ½ credits

732 Fine Art 2, 2 ½ credits

733 Fine Art 3, 2 ½ credits

735 3D 1, 2 ½ credits

736 3D 2, 2 ½ credits

724 3D 3, 2 ½ credits

722 Studio, 2 ½ credits

Grade 12

722 Studio, 2 ½ credits

723 Portfolio, 2 ½ credits

725 Design 1, 2 ½ credits

726 Design 2, 2 ½ credits

727 Design 3, 2 ½ credits

728 Media 1, 2 ½ credits

729 Media 2, 2 ½ credits

730 Media 3, 2 ½ credits

731 Fine Art 1, 2 ½ credits

732 Fine Art 2, 2 ½ credits

733 Fine Art 3, 2 ½ credits

735 3D 1, 2 ½ credits

736 3D 2, 2 ½ credits

724 3D 3, 2 ½ credits



Music

Full Year

Grade 9

760 Concert Band, 5 credits

761 Wind Ensemble, 5 credits

765 Orchestra, 5 credits

766 Chamber Orchestra, 5 credits

763 Chorus, 5 credits

Grade 10

760 Concert Band, 5 credits

761 Wind Ensemble, 5 credits

765 Orchestra, 5 credits

766 Chamber Orchestra, 5 credits

763 Chorus, 5 credits

764 Concert Choir, 5 credits

Grade 11

760 Concert Band, 5 credits

761 Wind Ensemble, 5 credits

765 Orchestra, 5 credits

766 Chamber Orchestra, 5 credits

763 Chorus, 5 credits

764 Concert Choir, 5 credits

772 Independent Study, 5 credits

Grade 12

760 Concert Band, 5 credits

761 Wind Ensemble, 5 credits

765 Orchestra, 5 credits

766 Chamber Orchestra, 5 credits

763 Chorus, 5 credits

764 Concert Choir, 5 credits

750 AP Music Theory, 5 credits

Semester

Grade 9

784 Electronic Piano I, 2 ½ credits

Grade 10

781 Music Technology I, 2 ½ credits

782 Music Technology II, 2 ½ credits

784 Electronic Piano I, 2 ½ credits

785 Electronic Piano II, 2 ½ credits

Grade 11

781 Music Technology I, 2 ½ credits

782 Music Technology II, 2 ½ credits

784 Electronic Piano I, 2 ½ credits

785 Electronic Piano II, 2 ½ credits

Grade 12

781 Music Technology I, 2 ½ credits

782 Music Technology II, 2 ½ credits

784 Electronic Piano I, 2 ½ credits

785 Electronic Piano II, 2 ½ credits

771 Independent Study, 2 ½ credits



Business

Grade 9

636 Intro to Occupations, 2 ½ credits

Grade 10

621 Accounting I, 2 ½ credits

623 Pers & Business Law Honors, 2 ½ credits

624 Sports & Entertainment Marketing, 2 ½ credits

628 Intro to College Business Hon, 2 ½ credits

635 Personal & Business Law CP, 2 ½ credits

636 Intro to Occupations, 2 ½ credits

638 Intro to College Business CP, 2 ½ credits

Grade 11

621 Accounting I, 2 ½ credits

622 Adv. Accounting, 2 ½ credits

623 Pers & Business Law Honors, 2 ½ credits

624 Sports & Entertainment Marketing, 2 ½ credits

625 Sports & Entertainment Marketing II, 2 ½ credits

627 Personal Finance & Bus. Hon, 2 ½ credits

628 Intro to College Business Hon, 2 ½ credits

635 Personal & Business Law CP, 2 ½ credits

636 Intro to Occupations, 2 ½ credits

637 Personal Finance & Bus. CP, 2 ½ credits

638 Intro to College Business CP, 2 ½ credits

Grade 12

621 Accounting I, 2 ½ credits

622 Adv. Accounting, 2 ½ credits

623 Pers & Business Law Honors, 2 ½ credits

624 Sports & Entertainment Marketing, 2 ½ credits

625 Sports & Entertainment Marketing II, 2 ½ credits

627 Personal Finance & Bus. Hon, 2 ½ credits

628 Intro to College Business Hon, 2 ½ credits

635 Personal & Business Law CP, 2 ½ credits

636 Intro to Occupations, 2 ½ credits

637 Personal Finance & Bus. CP, 2 ½ credits

638 Intro to College Business CP, 2 ½ credits



Health and Wellness

Full Year

Grade 9

9th Grade Physical Educ., (2 days out of 7 day cycle), 2 credits

Grade 10

10th Grade Physical Educ., (2 days out of 7 day cycle) , 2 credits

Grade 11

11th Grade Physical Educ., (2 days out of 7 day cycle) , 2 credits

820 Pre-School Lab I, 5 credits

Grade 12

12th Grade Physical Educ., (2 days out of 7 day cycle) , 2 credits

820 Pre-School Lab I, 5 credits

825 Pre-School Lab II, 5 credits

Semester

Grade 9

049 Health Education, 1 credit

Grade 10

823 Contemporary Health Issues, 2 ½ credits

821 Human Development and Parenting, 2 ½ credits

Grade 11

823 Contemporary Health Issues, 2 ½ credits

821 Human Development and Parenting, 2 ½ credits

822 Nutrition & Fitness, 2 ½ credits

Grade 12

823 Current Health Issues, 2 ½ credits

821 Human Development and Parenting, 2 ½ credits

822 Nutrition & Fitness, 2 ½ credits

Middle Schools

2017-2018

All courses described in the Program of Studies will be offered contingent upon sufficient student enrollment, available funds and teaching personnel. Word Doc

Administration

East Middle School

  • 781-380-0170
  • Fax - 781-848-4522
  • http://www.braintreeschools.org/east
  • John J. Sheehan, Principal
  • Andrew Curran, Assistant Principal
  • Sherry Minucci, Guidance Counselor
  • Katharine Lewis, Guidance Counselor
  • Lauren McGerigle, Guidance Counselor

South Middle School

  • 781-380-0160
  • Fax - 781-380-0164
  • http://www.braintreeschools.org/south
  • Damon Rainie, Principal
  • Elaine Pagliarulo, Assistant Principal
  • Amy Lyons, Guidance Counselor
  • Laura Riordan, Guidance Counselor

Braintree School Committee

  • Lisa Fiske Heger, Chairman
  • Tom Devin, Vice Chairman
  • George Kokoros, Recording Secretary
  • Cyril Chafe
  • Kate Naughton
  • David Ringius, Jr.
  • Joseph C. Sullivan, Mayor

Superintendent of Schools

  •  Dr. Frank Hackett

Braintree Public Schools Mission Statement

The mission of the Braintree Schools, in partnership with parents and the community, is to prepare all students to become responsible and contributing members of a diverse and global society.  We motivate and enable each student to develop intellectually, physically, socially, and emotionally through a rigorous and supportive educational program within an inclusive and safe environment that nurtures creative and critical thinking, the development of values, and the pursuit of lifelong learning.

Beliefs

Since excellence in instruction and student achievement is our primary objective, we are committed to the following beliefs:

  • Students should acquire a rigorous core of knowledge by thinking critically and creatively and making wise judgments in an environment that promotes higher level thinking skills across the curriculum.
  • All students can achieve academic proficiency and strive for excellence.
  • All students possess unique talents and gifts and should be encouraged to reach their maximum individual potential.
  • Students should be able to collaborate and communicate effectively through reading, writing, speaking, computing, the arts, and technology.
  • Students should acquire the knowledge, skills, and motivation necessary to achieve and maintain optimum health and lifelong fitness.
  • Students should develop a sense of self-discipline, self-respect, and self-reliance and demonstrate social, civic, and environmental responsibility.
  • Students should acquire skills to adapt to an evolving and technologically advancing society.
  • Students should understand, respect, and appreciate the racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity of our society and the democratic principles upon which this nation was built.
  • A safe and orderly environment, free of prejudice, drugs, violence, bullying, hazing and harassment of any kind, is essential to promote student learning.
  • Ongoing opportunities for the professional growth and development of staff are essential for  improving teaching and learning.
  • Parents, guardians and caregivers, in partnership with schools, are an integral part of their child's learning.
  • Community involvement should be actively solicited, encouraged, and developed.

Middle School Statement of Philosophy

The purpose of our school is to provide an environment which focuses on intellectual development while remaining cognizant of the social, physical and emotional needs of the developing adolescents.

The educational experience takes into account individual abilities in order to achieve mastery of learning, a sense of achievement, and a realization of potential.

The staff is committed to a variety of teaching methods which are student centered, and involve students in active learning experiences. It is the process of learning that is emphasized as the content is taught.

The diverse abilities, interest and needs of the students are also met through a variety of programs and activities which promote their physical and social development.

Finally, our aim is to produce students who recognize their own self-worth, the worth of others and the value of good citizenship.

Table of Contents

Grade 6 Course Descriptions/Information

  • English   
  • Social Studies
  • Science
  • Mathematics
  • Computers
  • Visual Arts
  • Music 
  • Physical Education
  • Health Education          
  • Standardized Testing 

Grade 7 Course Descriptions/Information

  • English
  • Social Studies
  • Science
  • Mathematics 
  • Foreign Languages
  • Visual Arts
  • Music
  • Physical Education
  • Health Education
  • Honor Roll
  • Standardized Testing

Grade 8 Course Descriptions/Information

  • English
  • Social Studies
  • Science
  • Mathematics
  • Foreign Languages
  • Visual Arts
  • Music
  • Physical Education
  • Honor Roll
  • Standardized Testing

All Grades

  • Special Services
  • Guidance Counseling Services
  • School Health Services
  • Homework Policy 
  • Student Council
  • Family Vacations
  • Report Cards
  • Progress Reports
  • Presidential Awards
  • Academic Subject Grouping
  • Teaming  
  • Athletics
  • After-School Activities
  • Promotion Policy 
  • Directors
  • Program of Studies Chart 
  • Nondiscrimination Policy

Grade 6

English

The sixth grade English course continues to emphasize the language arts skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening. Reading includes vocabulary development, comprehension skills, and literary selections. Grammar is included as part of the writing program. Book reports, projects, and oral reports are also given as English assignments as well as the usual homework in reading and composition.

Reading

Reading is offered to students  in the general education population reading below grade level. It is designed to improve reading ability by developing strengths and correcting weaknesses, according to individual need. Sixth, seventh and eighth grade students who are below grade level are encouraged to enroll in this course.

English Connections

English Connections class meets three times per cycle.  It is designed to provide support for students who are having difficulty in their proficient English cluster class.  The course re-enforces the reading and writing skills taught in the proficient English class.

Social Studies

“Ancient & Classical Civilizations”

After an opening unit on Early Man, grade six students build upon their prior knowledge as they revisit Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Ancient China.  They then focus on in-depth studies of the people and cultures of Greece, Rome, and Ancient  India. Hands-on projects and cooperative activities immerse students in ancient and medieval history.  Interdisciplinary team activities help students make connections.  Concurrently, students continue to develop basic study skills and research skills as an integral component of the curriculum.

Science

Grade 6 students take an integrated science course that addresses topics in earth and space science, physical science, life science, and technology/engineering that are aligned with the 2016 Massachusetts Science and Technology/Engineering Standards. Students actively engage in investigations to experience the concepts they are learning and to develop skill in the practices used by scientists and engineers.  The areas addressed in grade 6 are  physical science, including properties of matter, waves and their applications in technologies for information transfer, and forces and gravity; earth and space science, including Earth’s place in the universe, and Earth’s systems; life science, including biological evolution, the structure and function of cells, and energy and living things; and technology/engineering including engineering design, materials, tools, and manufacturing, and communication systems.

Mathematics

The sixth grade Common Core mathematics curriculum focuses on (1) connecting ratio and rate to whole number multiplication and division, and using concepts of ratio and rate to solve problems; (2) completing understanding of division of fractions and extending the notion of number to the system of rational numbers, which includes negative numbers; (3) writing, interpreting, and using expressions and equations; and (4) developing understanding of statistical thinking.

Pre-Algebra

Meeting three days per cycle, this course complements Common Core Mathematics Grade 6 by concentrating on the use of variables in mathematical expressions.  Students write expressions and equations that correspond to given situations, evaluate expressions, and use expressions and formulas to solve problems.  Students use properties of operations and the idea of maintaining the equality of both sides of an equation to solve simple one-step and two-step equations.  Students construct and analyze tables, such as tables of quantities that are in equivalent ratios, and they use equations to describe relationships between quantities. 

Math ConnectionsMath Connections class meets three times per cycle.  It is designed to provide support for students who are having difficulty in their proficient math cluster class.  The course re-enforces the math taught in the proficient math class.

Computers

Meeting three times per cycle, the goal of the course is to train students to use a wide variety of computer applications they will use in their academic and professional careers:  word processing, publishing, spreadsheets, databases, PowerPoint, research on the internet, Web 2.0 tools, HTML programming and more.  The course also addresses internet safety and the ethical use of technology.

*All use of the internet requires an Acceptable Use Policy signed by both student and parent.

Visual Arts

The Visual Arts program at the middle school gives all students an opportunity to explore new ideas and materials, to develop skills and techniques, and to express visual and sensory experiences. The curriculum emphasizes perception and imaginative thinking and supports experimentation as the students are encouraged to develop their individuality. In the sixth, seventh and eighth grades, the students have multiple opportunities to be creative, to practice problem solving and to develop an awareness and appreciation of art forms past and present. In grade six the focus of the visual arts program is the familiar world.  This course meets three times per cycle for half the year. Students are encouraged to reflect upon what they see and feel by using their developing creativity in combination with technical skills basic to creating art. The curriculum is consistent with the Massachusetts State Framework on Art Education 

Music

The middle school music program provides sixth grade students with the opportunity to continue their development of general musicianship, musical understanding, achievement, and  personal expression through the performing arts electives of band, chorus, and orchestra.

Instrumental/ChoralTopics covered include basic rehearsal techniques, introduction to music theory, music history, sight-reading, and vocal development.

Instrumental/Choral ConcertsChorus, band, and orchestra are performance-based classes.  The concerts students perform are the culmination of techniques and information learned.  The students’ learning is incomplete without this component.  Therefore, as a Music Department, it is our belief that students enrolled in performance-based music classes are to attend all scheduled concert events.

Physical Education

One of the beliefs of the Braintree Public Schools is that all students should have the knowledge, skills, and motivation to achieve a physically active lifestyle.  At the middle school level this is a great opportunity to instill these beliefs in our students. One of our goals is for the students to become competent movers in a variety of team, dual, and individual sports. Lifetime fitness activities including yoga, weight training, golf, and running are also included to give students insight on activities they can use as they outgrow team sports after high school.  Learning about the importance of a healthy diet and the benefits of living a physically active lifestyle are other goals of the program.  It is hoped that as a result of the middle school physical education experience, students will develop a positive attitude toward a lifetime of being physically active and understand and appreciate the importance of good sportsmanship.  Physical education is required all three years of middle school.

Health Education

The sixth grade health education course meets three times per cycle for half the year.  This course is aligned with the National Health Standards and the Massachusetts Health Curriculum Framework and is taught using a skills based approach. When skills are combined with functional health information, students have both the knowledge and the ability to apply this knowledge, to making healthy choices in all areas of their lives (physical, mental/emotional, and social). Throughout this course, the following skills, which are based on the National Health Education Standards, will be discussed: Accessing Valid Information, Analyzing Influences, Interpersonal Communication, Decision Making, Goal setting, Self-Management and Advocacy.  The health content areas include personal health, self-esteem, body systems, nutrition, fitness, positive peer relationships, and tobacco, alcohol and other drugs. Parents/guardians who do not wish to have their student enrolled in health education must notify the Principal’s office in writing during the programming cycle.

MCAS Testing

Grade six students are tested in English Language Arts and Literature and Mathematics.

Grade 7

English

The seventh grade English course encourages creativity and proficiency in oral and written composition and emphasizes the skills needed for communication. In the study of grammar, the focus is on appropriate usage and paragraph development.  The formal study of literature is introduced in the seventh grade.  The reading selections include fiction, nonfiction, prose and poetry. Vocabulary and spelling are also part of the English curriculum.

Reading, Writing & Research

Meeting three times per cycle, students are encouraged to become independent learners and to see relationships between subjects. The interdisciplinary approach reinforces strategies used to access text across a variety of genres.  Activities and projects foster the development of writing skills and lead to the organization, assessment, and presentation of information.

Reading

Reading  is offered to students in the general education population reading below grade level. It is designed to improve reading ability by developing strengths and correcting weaknesses, according to individual need. Sixth, seventh and eighth grade students who are below grade level are encouraged to enroll in this course.

English Connections

English Connections class meets three times per cycle.  It is designed to provide support for students who are having difficulty in their proficient English cluster class.  The course re-enforces the reading and writing skills taught in the proficient English class.

Social Studies

World Geography”

The seventh grade program provides an opportunity to broaden the concept of humanity with a global context. The focus is on the world as the home of many different people who strive to deal with the forces that shape their lives. The content is international in scope (Asia, Africa, South America, Latin America, Europe, Australia) with major emphasis on the five themes of geography:  location, place, human environment interaction, movement and region. The interpretation of maps, charts, tables, graphs, and data; problem solving through case studies; and research projects are among the development.

Science

Grade 7 students take an integrated science course that addresses topics in earth and space science, physical science, life science and technology/engineering that are aligned with the 2016 Massachusetts Science and Technology/Engineering Standards. Students actively engage in investigations to experience the concepts they are learning and to develop skill in the practices used by scientists and engineers.  The areas addressed in grade 7 are  physical science, including electricity and magnetism, potential and kinetic energy, and heat transfer; earth and space science, including slow and rapid changes in the earth’s surface and Earth and human activity; life science, including the interactions, energy, and dynamics of ecosystems and the physiology of the major human body systems; and technology/engineering including engineering design and technological systems.

Mathematics

The seventh grade Common Core mathematics curriculum focuses on (1) developing understanding of and applying proportional relationships; (2) developing understanding of operations with rational numbers and working with expressions and linear equations; (3) solving problems involving scale drawings and informal geometric constructions, and working with two– and three– dimensional shapes to solve problems involving area, surface area, and volume; and (4) drawing inferences about populations based on samples.

Math Connections

Math Connections class meets three times per cycle.  It is designed to provide support for students who are having difficulty in their proficient math cluster class.  The course re-enforces the math taught in the proficient math class.

World Languages

French or Spanish

Students may select one of these introductory courses which meet three periods per six-day cycle (half-year of credit).  This course provides students with an introduction to the competencies of listening, speaking, reading and writing in the target language as well as an opportunity to learn about the cultures of Spanish or French speaking countries.  Bilingual speakers should not select their native language as the course content is too elementary at this level.  Once at the high school, these students may select their native language at an appropriate level of study.  Students are required to continue with the same language through grade eight as the courses are sequential.

Visual Arts

The visual arts program at the middle school gives all students an opportunity to explore new ideas and materials, to develop skills and techniques, and to express visual and sensory experiences. The curriculum emphasizes perception and imaginative thinking, and encourages experimentation as the students are encouraged to develop their individuality. In the sixth, seventh and eighth grades, the students have multiple opportunities to be creative, to practice problem solving and to develop an awareness and appreciation of art forms past and present. In grade seven the focus of the visual arts program is the visual and aesthetic world.  Students are encouraged to use a variety of methods to explore, to shape, and to communicate their perceptions.  This curriculum is consistent with the Massachusetts State Framework on Art Education.

Music

The middle school music program provides seventh grade students with the opportunity to continue their development of general musicianship, musical understanding, achievement, and personal expression through the performing arts electives of band, chorus, and orchestra.

Instrumental/Choral

Topics to be covered include intermediate music theory (scale studies, minor sol-fege, compound time signatures), music history (Classical Period), sight-reading, and the changing voice.

Instrumental/Choral Concerts

Chorus, band, and orchestra are performance-based classes.  The concerts students perform are the culmination of techniques and information learned.  The students’ learning is incomplete without this component.  Therefore, as a Music Department, it is our belief that students enrolled in performance-based music classes are to attend all scheduled concert events.

Physical Education

One of the beliefs of the Braintree Public Schools is that all students should have the knowledge, skills, and motivation to achieve a physically active lifestyle.  At the middle school level, this is a great opportunity to instill these beliefs in our students. One of our goals is for the students to become competent movers in a variety of team, dual, and individual sports.  Lifetime fitness activities including yoga, weight training, golf, and running are also included to give students insight on activities they can use as they outgrow team sports after high school.  Learning about the importance of a healthy diet and the benefits of living a physically active lifestyle are other goals of the program.  It is hoped that as a result of the middle school physical education experience, students will develop a positive attitude toward a lifetime of being physically active and understand and appreciate the importance of good sportsmanship.  Physical education is required all three years of middle school.

Health Education

The seventh grade health education course meets three times per cycle for half the year.  The curriculum is aligned with the National Health Education Standards and the Massachusetts Health Curriculum Framework and is taught using a skills based approach. This course provides students with the knowledge and skills needed to make healthy choices, responsible decisions, maintain positive attitudes and healthy bodies.  The health content areas include personal health, hygiene, nutrition and fitness, alcohol and other drugs, personal safety, mental and emotional wellness, disease prevention, violence prevention and conflict resolution. Parents/guardians who do not wish to have their student enrolled in health education must notify the Principal’s office in writing during the programming cycle.

Honor Roll

Braintree Middle Schools - Grades 7 and 8 only.  A pupil is placed on the Honor Roll if he or she earns at least a grade of B- in all subjects. The Honor Roll is posted on the bulletin board outside of the main office. The Honor Roll is not published in the newspaper.

MCAS Testing

Grade seven students are tested in the following subjects:  English Language Arts and Literature and Mathematics.

Grade 8

English

The eighth grade English course includes novels and selections from American literature as well as other traditional and contemporary authors.  It continues the study of grammar and composition. Effective usage and clear organization are emphasized in writing development.  Homework is regularly assigned.

Writing Workshop

Writing Workshop is a grade eight writing course for all students. Meeting three times per cycle in a writing lab, the course focuses on the organization and presentation of ideas, the development of unified, coherent paragraphs, and the strategies useful in written assignments. The application of writing skills in all subjects is emphasized.

Reading

Reading  is offered to students reading below grade level. It is designed to improve reading ability by developing strengths and correcting weaknesses, according to individual need. Sixth, seventh and eighth grade students who are below grade level in reading are encouraged to enroll in this course.

English Connections

English Connections class meets three times per cycle.  It is designed to provide support for students who are having difficulty in their proficient English cluster class.  The course re-enforces the reading and writing skills taught in the proficient English class.

Social Studies

“U.S. History to 1877”

The main focus of the eighth grade social studies program centers around the theme "Man's Search for Freedom." The unique contribution of men and women who built the heritage we Americans share is stressed. Historical perspective of the struggle and winning of American independence and the creation of the American governmental system, the rise of nationalism and territorial expansion, the emergence of sectionalism leading to the Civil War and the period of Reconstruction are fully explored. The course concludes with the closing of the western frontier and the lure of America's urban frontier. In addition to the study of our nation's history, students use the tools of historical analysis to refine their critical thinking and research skills and develop an awareness of the world around them and how each person fits into that world.

Science

Grade 8 students take an integrated science course that addresses topics in earth and space science, physical science, life science and technology/engineering that are aligned with the 2016 Massachusetts Science and Technology/Engineering Standards. Students actively engage in investigations to experience the concepts they are learning and to develop skill in the practices used by scientists and engineers.  The areas addressed in grade 8 are  physical science, including matter and its interactions and motion and forces; earth and space science, including Earth’s place in the universe, Earth’s systems, and Earth and human activity; life science, including structures and processes from molecules to organisms, heredity, and biological evolution; and technology/engineering including materials, tools, and manufacturing.

Mathematics

The eighth grade Common Core mathematics curriculum focuses on (1) formulating and reasoning about expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations; (2) grasping the concept of a function and using functions to describe quantitative relationships; (3) analyzing two– and three-dimensional space and figures using distance, angle, similarity, and congruence, and understanding and applying the Pythagorean Theorem.

Math Connections

Math Connections class meets three times per cycle.  It is designed to provide support for students who are having difficulty in their proficient math cluster class.  The course re-enforces the math taught in the proficient math class.

World Languages

French or Spanish

Students are expected to continue the same language study from grade seven.  These courses meet daily and continue to develop the four competencies of listening, speaking, reading and writing in the target language.   Students also continue to learn about the cultures of French or Spanish speaking countries.

Visual Arts

The Visual Arts program at the middle school gives all students an opportunity to explore new ideas and materials, to develop skills and techniques, and to express visual and sensory experiences. The curriculum emphasizes perception and imaginative thinking, and encourages experimentation as the students are encouraged to develop their individuality. In the sixth, seventh and eighth grades, the students will find multiple opportunities to be creative, to practice problem solving and to develop an awareness and appreciation of art forms past and present.

In grade eight, the focus of the visual arts program is a continuation of reflection upon the visual and aesthetic world.  Now able to elect studio art, students use a variety of methods to explore, shape, and communicate their perceptions.  Students are coached in the development of imaginative and reflective thinking, which they then depict in art.  This curriculum is consistent with the Massachusetts State Framework on Art Education.

Music

The middle school music program provides eighth grade students with the opportunity to  continue their development of general musicianship, musical understanding, achievement, and  personal expression through the performing arts electives of band, chorus and orchestra.

Instrumental/ChoralTopics covered include advanced music theory (harmony, analysis, composition), music history (Non-Western music and jazz), improvisation, and sight-reading.

Instrumental/Choral

Chorus, band, and orchestra are performance-based classes.  The concerts students perform are the culmination of techniques and information learned.  The students’ learning is incomplete without this component.  Therefore, as a Music Department, it is our belief that students enrolled in performance-based music classes are to attend all scheduled concert events.

Physical Education

One of the beliefs of the Braintree Public Schools is that all students should have the knowledge, skills, and motivation to achieve a physically active lifestyle.  At the middle school level, this is a great opportunity to instill these beliefs in our students. One of our goals is for the students to become competent movers in a variety of team, dual, and individual sports.  Lifetime fitness activities including yoga, weight training, golf, and running are also included to give students insight on activities they can use as they outgrow team sports after high school.  Learning about the importance of a healthy diet and the benefits of living a physically active lifestyle are other goals of the program.  It is hoped that as a result of the middle school physical education experience, students will develop a positive attitude toward a lifetime of being physically active and understand and appreciate the importance of good sportsmanship.  Physical education is required all three years of middle school.

Honor Roll

Braintree Middle Schools - Grades 7 and 8 only.  A pupil is placed on the Honor Roll if he or she earns at least a grade of B- in all subjects. The Honor Roll is posted on the bulletin board outside of the main office. The Honor Roll is not published in the newspaper.

MCAS Testing

Grade 8 students are tested in the following subjects:  English Language Arts Literature, Mathematics, and Science and Technology/Engineering.

All Grades

Special Services

Resource rooms have been established at each of the middle schools. Special needs teachers are a part of the faculty at each of the middle schools. Services are provided to students who are found to have learning difficulties as related to their overall functioning in the middle schools. Special needs teachers provide direct remedial instruction to students who have been evaluated and found in need of services. In addition, special needs teachers assist subject matter teachers in adapting the instructional process to help meet the needs of these students in class.

Substantially separate programs are offered in areas of developmental delays, emotional growth and development, language based programs, specialized reading instruction and occupational and physical therapy for students whose I.E.P.'s recommend these services for the student.

Guidance Counseling Services

Counseling services are provided to all students and parents to help in educational, vocational and personal matters.

Students are assigned to the same counselor for their duration in middle school, thus enhancing pupil-counseling opportunities for personal, social and educational growth and development.

Personal conferences are scheduled with each student to discuss such things as student interests, abilities, course selection, future educational and vocational opportunities, and personal or social concerns.

Students should feel free to talk with their counselor at any time. Parents are encouraged to make appointments to meet with counselors whenever necessary or desirable. Every effort is made to meet with each individual sixth grade student early in the year to promote a smooth transition to the middle school.

Other services provided by counselors include testing and evaluation, dissemination of occupational and vocational information, orientation programs and conferences with parents and referral agencies.

The middle school uses a three digit coding system for identification of courses offered. The first digit identifies the subject, the second digit identifies the grade level and the third digit identifies the program or grouping placement.

School Health Services

Optimal learning requires good health.  For this reason, the school nurse is available to help facilitate and maximize your child’s health and learning.  Services include: acute and emergency care, health counseling, identification of potential health problems, providing preventative health measures, conducting mandated health screenings, medication administration and evaluation, immunization monitoring for adherence to state regulations, comprehensive and appropriate health education for students, parents and staff as needed, skilled nursing care and case management for children with special needs, individual health care planning, promoting a healthful and safe school environment, review and interpretation of medical records and linking families to community services as needed.

Homework Policy

Homework is an integral part of the learning process and is assigned in a manner supportive of and consistent with the needs of the students and the curriculum. Homework at the middle school is assigned daily in each major subject. Assignments vary in length from approximately 15 minutes to 30 minutes per subject, consistent with the class and/or the student’s abilities. In the exploratory subjects homework is given periodically depending on the unit being studied. Homework will account for 10-15% of the term grade.

Student Council

Student council members represent and serve their fellow students in the conduct of the various activities sponsored by the council and the school. The council meets regularly during the school year under the direction of a faculty member.

Early in the school year student council elections are held. The council elects its own officers. Standards of scholarship and citizenship must be maintained consistently if a student is to remain eligible for membership in the council.

Members of the student council profit immeasurably from their experiences while serving on the council. These experiences prepare them for future roles of leadership in school and community.

Family Vacations

If parents decide to go on a vacation of five days or less when school is in session, the pupil will be responsible to make up all work and will be allowed to make up examinations scheduled during this period.  The time limit for completion of all work is twice the number of vacation days.

If parents decide to take their son or daughter out of school for more than five days for what is clearly a vacation, this absence cannot be treated in the same manner as the case above or as one for illness, a family emergency, or a unique educational experience. Such extended unapproved absences which cause a critical lack of learning may, in addition to placing the student in danger of failing, be in violation of the attendance laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Accordingly, the pupil will have the same loss of privileges as other pupils who are absent for unauthorized reasons. That is, he will not be allowed to take any examinations or pass in any work for credit which was scheduled during the absence. The administration will, however, request teachers to provide a description of the class work that will be missed during the absence in order that the pupil will have an opportunity to keep abreast of what will be covered in each of his subjects.

Parents in all of these circumstances should inform principals of the schools involved well in advance of the intended absence, and pupils should inform their teachers at least two weeks in advance of the absence in order to give them adequate time to prepare a description of what will be covered in class during the absence.

Report Cards

Grade

Description
A, A- Work of superior quality
B+, B, B- Work of excellent quality
C+, C, C-  Work of average quality
D+, D, D- Work of poor quality, but passing
F Work of unsatisfactory quality-failing
I Incomplete work
W Withdrawn from the course
ME Medically Excused

 

Progress Reports

Progress reports are issued to students four times during the school year: October, December, March and May. The purpose of these reports is to inform students and parents of their progress in their classes. These reports are given by all teachers and highlight areas of achievement as well as those that need improvement. With the X2 Aspen Family Portal, parents will have access to student attendance, contact information, grades, homework assignments and schedules.

Progress Reports are available on X2. Report cards must be signed and returned to school 24 hours after their issue. Parent cooperation is requested and appreciated.

Presidential Awards

This prestigious award goes to students who have maintained a B average throughout middle school, scored at or above  on at least one of the  tests, and made the honor roll for seven consecutive terms.

Academic Subject Groupings

Academic grouping exists to provide an opportunity for each student to learn at a rate and in an environment best suited to the student as an individual.

Properly placed, a student with a positive attitude and good study habits will achieve. Academic placements are reviewed each year by teachers and counselors to ensure that the student can experience  both challenge and success. MCAS scores, student performance, and teacher recommendations are used to place students in the appropriate groups.

Students are divided into two Clusters—A (advanced) and P (proficient).  Grade 8 Spanish students are also divided into  advanced and proficient clusters.

Teaming

Middle School Teaming enables teachers to engage in collaborative lesson planning, defining common learning goals and developing interventions for struggling learners.  Through this collaborative time, teachers will improve their ability to meet student’s academic and social needs and positively impact student achievement.

Athletics

Interscholastic AthleticsBoys and girls basketball and soccer are currently the interscholastic sports offered at the middle school level.

Intramural ProgramStudents are encouraged to participate both before and after school in our intramural program.  A wide range of activities are offered. Student interest determines the final activity selection.  The intramural program is open to all interested students.  As an outgrowth of the physical education program, the intramural program allows for further skill development in an environment structured to develop both good sportsmanship and positive self-esteem.

After-School Activities

The options for after-school activities and clubs depend on teacher and student interest.  They are supported by a school-wide fundraiser.

Promotion Policy

Students who fail English or math must take the course in summer school.  Students with two or three failures in the academic subjects (English, social studies, science, math) will be recommended for retention unless two courses are made up in summer school.  The passing grade for summer school courses is C-.  Students who fail all four academic subjects will be automatically retained.

Directors

Department Contact Phone
781-848-4000
+extension
Art Heidi Hurley 7830
English Rock Roberts 7376
Foreign Languages Gail Ward 7850
Mathematics Courtney Miller 7845
Music Rachel Hallenbeck 7825
PE/Health Melonie Bennett 7800
Science Betsey Clifford 7805
Social Studies Gorman Lee 7835
Special Services Jeffrey Rubin  7620

 

Program of Studies

Numbers indicate the time a class meets in a six day cycle

Grade 6 Subjects

Grade 7 Subjects

Grade 8 Subjects

English, 6

English, 6

English, 6

Social Studies, 6

Social Studies, 6

Social Studies, 6

Science, 6

Science, 6

Science, 6

Mathematics, 6

Mathematics, 6

Mathematics, 6

Pre-Algebra, 3

Reading, Writing Research, 3

Foreign Language 
(cont. from grade 7)            

Computers, 3

Physical Education, 3

     French, 6

Physical Education, 3

Health, 1/2 year, 3

     Spanish, 6

Health, 1/2 year, 3

Art, 3

Writing Workshop, 3

Art, 1/2 year, 3

Music (choice of 1)

Physical Education, 3

Music (choice of 1)

       Band, 3

Fine Arts (choice of 1)

      Band, 3

       Orchestra, 3

     Art, 3

      Orchestra, 3

       Chorus, 3

     Band, 3

      Chorus, 3

Foreign Language (choice of 1)

     Orchestra, 3

By Recommendation Only

       French, 3

     Chorus, 3

      Reading, 3

       Spanish, 3

By Recommendation Only

      Math Connection, 3

By Recommendation Only

     Reading, 3

      English Connections, 3

       Reading, 3

     Math Connections, 3

 

       In lieu of language

     English Connections, 3

 

              Math Connections, 3

 

 

              English Connections, 3

 

 

Braintree Public Schools Nondiscrimination Policy
The Braintree Public Schools does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, national origin, sexual orientation or disability in admission to its programs, services, or activities, in access to them, in treatment of individuals, in its hiring or employment practices or in any aspect of its operations.