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Summer Work


2017 Summer Reading Materials - Select Grade/Course Below

Grades K-5: How many bingos can you earn?


Summer Book Bingo Logo

Bingo board for students entering Grades K-3

Bingo board for students entering Grade 4

Bingo board for students entering Grade 5

As you help your child select books to read this summer, please consider this list a starting point. These titles are suggestions from teachers across town and the librarians at Thayer Library. None of these are required reads, and students are welcome to read from the grade levels above or below their own! We hope you find this list helpful as you look for new great reads and revisit some old favorites.

Suggested books for students entering Grades K-5:

For students entering Kindergarten or first grade…

  • A Bad Case of the Stripes by David Shannon
  • Biggest, Strongest, Fastest by Steve Jenkins
  • Chicka Chicka Boom Boom by Bill Martin, Jr.
  • Chrysanthemum by Kevin Hankes
  • The Curious George Series by H.A. Rey
  • Horton Hears a Who by Dr. Seuss
  • The Legend of Bluebonnet by Tomie DePaola
  • Make Way for Ducklings by Robert McClosky
  • The Mitten by Jan Brett
  • The Napping House by Audrey Wood
  • One is a Snail, Ten is a Crab by April Pulley Sayre
  • The Pigeon Books by Mo Willems
  • Snowballs by Lois Ehlert
  • Tops and Bottoms by Janet Stevens
  • The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by Jon Sciezka

Children who are beginning to read on their own will enjoy Level 1 and 2 books from publishers like Scholastic, Penguin, and Harper. Candlewick Press has a similar series called Brand New Readers.

For students entering second grade…

  • The Amelia Bedelia Series by Peggy Parish
  • The Biscuit Series by Alyssa Satin Capucilli
  • The Cam Jansen Series by David A. Adler
  • The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss
  • The Fenway Foul-up by David Kelly
  • The Fox and His Friends Series by James Marshall
  • The Golly Sisters Series by Betsy Byars
  • The Elephant and Piggie Series by Mo Willems
  • Kick, Pass, and Run by Leonard Kessler
  • The Mr. Putter and the Tabby series by Cynthia Rylant
  • The Nate the Great Series by Marjorie Weinman Sharmat
  • The Secrets of Droon Series by Tony Abbott
  • The Tiny Series by Cari Meister
  • The You Read to Me, I’ll Read to You Series by Mary Ann Hoberman
  • What Do You Do with a Tail Like This? by Steve Jenkins

For students entering third grade…

  • Alvin Ho: Allergic to Girls, School, and Other Scary Things by Lenore Look
  • Bones by Steve Jenkins
  • The Clementine Series by Sara Pennypacker
  • The Ghosthunters Series by Cornelia Funke
  • The Horrible Harry Series by Suzy Kline
  • The Judy Moody Series by Megan McDonald
  • The Katie Kazoo, Switcheroo Series by Nancy Krulik
  • The Magic Tree House Series by Mary Pope Osborne
  • The Marvin Redpost Series by Louis Sachar
  • The Mercy Watson Series by Kate DiCamillo
  • The Nikki and Deja Series by Karen English and Laura Freeman
  • The Phineas L. MacGuire Series by Francis O’Roark Dowell
  • The Ramona Series by Beverly Cleary
  • Rats on the Roof by James Marshall
  • The Third Grade Detectives Series by George E. Stanley
  • Three Terrible Trins by Dick King-Smith
  • The Toys Go Out Books by Emily Jenkins

For students entering fourth grade…

  • Babe and Me by Dan Gutman
  • The BFG by Roald Dahl
  • Bunnicula by James Howe
  • The Chocolate Touch by Patrick Skene Catling
  • Daniel at the Siege of Boston by Laurie Calkhoven
  • The Dark Hills Divide by Patrick Carman
  • The Doll People by Ann Martin
  • The I Survived... Series by Lauren Tarshis
  • Igraine the Brave by Cornelia Funke
  • James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
  • Jeremy Thatcher, Dragon Hatcher by Bruce Coville
  • The Joey Pigza Books by Jack Gantos
  • Joshua’s Song by Joan Harlow
  • The Million Dollar Shot by Dan Gutman
  • The School Story by Andrew Clements
  • The So You Want to Be Books by Judith St. George and David Small
  • The Stories Huey Tells by Ann Cameron
  • The You Wouldn’t Want to … Series by various authors

For students entering fifth grade…

  • The Series of Unfortunate Events Series by Lemony Snicket
  • Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
  • Bud, Not Buddy by Paul Christopher Curtis
  • The Guardians of Ga’hoole Series by Kathryn Lasky
  • The Dealing with Dragons Series by Patricia Wrede
  • Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
  • The Emmy Series by Lynne Jonnell
  • Eragon by Christopher Paolini
  • Fablehaven by Brandon Mull
  • The King of Mulberry Street by Donna Jo Napoli
  • The Lionboy Books by Zizou Corder
  • Magyk by Angie Sage
  • The Molly Moon Series by Georgia Byng
  • On the Wings of Heroes by Richard Peck
  • The Penderwicks Books by Jeanne Birdsall
  • Prince of Fenway Park by Julianna Baggot
  • The Redwall Series by Brian Jacques
  • The Rowan of Rin Series by Emily Rodda
  • Ruby Holler by Sharon Creech
  • The Secret Garden by Frances Burnett
  • The Spiderwick Chronicles Series by Tony DiTerlizzi
  • The Tale of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo

Great books to read aloud at any age…

  • The 26 Fairmont Avenue Series by Tomie DePaola
  • Chasing Vermeer by Blue Balliet
  • The Chet Gecko Mystery Series by Bruce Hale
  • The Cobble Street Cousins Series by Cynthia Rylant
  • Danny, Champion of the World by Roald Dahl
  • The Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling
  • How to Train Your Dragon by Cressida Cowell
  • The Little House in the Big Woods Series by Laura Ingalls Wilder
  • The Charlie Bone Series by Jenny Nimmo
  • The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane by Kate DiCamillo
  • Mr. Chickee’s Funny Money by Christopher Paul Curtis
  • The Mysterious Benedict Society Series by Trenton Lee Stewart
  • New Kid on the Block by Jack Prelutsky
  • Paint the Wind by Pam Munoz Ryan
  • Stuart Little by E.B. White
  • Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
  • Winnie-the-Pooh by A.A. Milne

If you prefer, click here to print a list of the suggested books for students entering grades K-5.

Questions? Please contact Rock Roberts, Director of English & Reading, K-12 at rroberts@braintreema.gov or 781-848-4000 x7856

Grade 6

Dear Parents and Guardians:

I hope you and your student are enjoying the conclusion to a productive year with the Braintree Public Schools. Throughout the year, students had many opportunities to read and listen to books read aloud during the school day. Your support for those same reading experiences at home will help your child continue to grow as a reader, writer, thinker, and learner.

As you plan for the summer, please consider the literacy experiences your child will have in these months away from the classroom. Faculty members at East and South Middle Schools have selected Gennifer Choldenko’s Al Capone Does My Shirts for all incoming sixth graders to read over the summer.

When school begins in the fall, all sixth grade English classes will participate in learning activities related to the novel. In addition to Al Capone Does My Shirts, your son or daughter should read at least one other book. Any title you select together is a great choice!

Al Capone Does My Shirts is readily available locally or via online booksellers, in paperback, hardcover or Kindle/Nook versions. In addition to local bookstores, the Thayer Public Library is a valuable (and free!) resource. If you need help in selecting more books, do not hesitate to ask the librarian!

For those of you planning travel this summer, consider going beyond the bookshelves and print pages to include audio books in your student’s experience. These are available at the library on CD or on iTunes (ready to go right onto an iPod!). While audio books are no replacement for reading, they are a wonderful supplement, especially when experienced with a copy of the actual book. Many books are also available for reading on a Kindle, Nook, iPad, other tablet, or smartphone.

As you explore Al Capone Does My Shirts and other books that interest your student, remember that summer reading is for pleasure! I hope you and your son or daughter find many enjoyable books and stories to be part of your summer. I look forward to working with you throughout your student’s middle school experience.

Sincerely,

Rock B. Roberts
Director of English & Reading, K-12
rroberts@braintreema.gov

All students entering grade 6 at East or South will read...

Al Capone Does My Shirts, A Tale From Alcatraz

Twelve-year-old Moose moves to Alcatraz in 1935 so his father can work as a prison guard and his younger, autistic sister, Natalie, can attend a special school in San Francisco. It is a time when the federal prison is home to notorious criminals like gang-ster Al Capone. Depressed about having to leave his friends and winning baseball team behind, Moose finds little to be happy about on Alcatraz. He never sees his dad, who is always working; and Natalie's condition-- her tantrums and constant needs--demand all his mother's attention. Things look up for Moose when he be-friends the irresistible Piper, the warden's daughter, who has a knack for getting Moose into embarrassing but harmless trouble. Helped by Piper, Moose eventually comes to terms with his new situation. With its unique setting and well-developed characters, this warm, engaging coming-of-age story has plenty of appeal, and Choldenko offers some fascinating historical background on Alcatraz Island in an afterword. Ed Sullivan
Copyright © American Library Association.

Students should also select a second book (with parent approval!) to read before the start of the year. The instructions for short written responses to each book are below.

Steps to a Complete Summer Reading Assignment for Students Entering Grade 6:

  • Get your copy of Al Capone Does My Shirts—from the library, a local bookseller, or an online store.
  • Read it and answer the questions below in your own handwriting on a separate sheet of paper.

1. Identify the qualities that make Moose a good brother. Support your answer by using examples from the text.

2. Piper is an emotional bully. Emotional bullying is when a person tries to get what they want by making others feel angry or afraid. Give three examples of times when Piper is an emotional bully.

3. Moose moves to a new place. Describe at least two positive effects and two negative effects of this change on Moose.

  • Select any other book (with parent approval).
  • Read it and complete the questions below in your own handwriting.

1. List at least five important events and give a brief explanation of why each is important to the book.

2. What is the central conflict or major problem that characters/people face in the book? How is it resolved?

3. Describe a choice one of the main characters or people made in the book. How did this choice change that character/person? How did it affect the story as a whole?

  • This assignment should be completed before your return to school and will be graded for effort and completeness.
  • Turn in your written work to your English teacher in the fall.
  • Participate in the summer reading class activity in your English class.
  • Your passing or failing mark for summer reading will show via the Aspen X2 Student/Parent Portal


Printable Version of Grade 6 Assignment Available Here.

Grade 7

Dear Parents and Guardians:

I hope you and your student are enjoying the conclusion to a productive year with the Braintree Public Schools. Throughout the year, students have many opportunities to read and listen to books read aloud during the school day. Your support for those same reading experiences at home will help your child continue to grow as a reader, writer, thinker, and learner.

As you plan for the summer, please consider the literacy experiences your child will have in these months away from the classroom. Faculty members at East and South Middle Schools have selected Holly Goldberg Sloan’s Counting by 7’s for all incoming seventh graders to read over the summer. When school begins in the fall, all seventh grade English classes will participate in learning activities related to the novel. In addition to Counting by 7’s , your son or daughter should read at least one other book. Any title you select together is a great choice!

Counting by 7’s is readily available locally or via online booksellers, in paperback, hardcover or Kindle/Nook versions. In addition to local bookstores, the Thayer Public Library is a valuable (and free!) resource. If you need help in selecting more books, do not hesitate to ask the librarian!

For those of you planning travel this summer, consider going beyond the bookshelves and print pages to include audio books in your student’s experience. While audio books are not a replacement for reading, they are a wonderful supplement, especially when experienced with a copy of the actual book. Audio books are available at the library on CD or on iTunes.

As you explore Counting by 7’s and other books that interest your student, remember that summer reading is for pleasure! I hope you and your son or daughter find many enjoyable books and stories to be part of your summer. I look forward to working with you throughout your student’s middle school experience.

Sincerely,
Rock Roberts
Director of English and Reading, K-12
rroberts@braintreema.gov

All students entering grade 7 at East or South will read...

Counting by 7s



Counting by 7’s

by Holly Goldberg Sloan



In the tradition of Out of My Mind, Wonder, and Mockingbird, this is an intensely moving middle grade novel about being an outsider, coping with loss, and discovering the true meaning of family.

Willow Chance is a twelve-year-old genius, obsessed with nature and diagnosing medical conditions, who finds it comforting to count by 7s. It has never been easy for her to connect with anyone other than her adoptive parents, but that hasn’t kept her from leading a quietly happy life . . . until now.

This extraordinarily odd, but extraordinarily endearing, girl manages to push through her trying situation. Her journey to find a fascinatingly diverse and fully believable surrogate family is a joy and a revelation to read. – adapted from The Book Smugglers

Students should also select a second book (with parent approval!) to read before the start of the year. The instructions for short written responses to each book are below.

Steps to a Complete Summer Reading Assignment for Students Entering Grade 7:

  • Get your copy of Counting by 7’s —from the library, a local bookseller, or an online store.
  • Read it and answer the Counting by 7’s questions (at right) in your own handwriting on a separate sheet of paper. (Sheets available to fill in at www.braintreeschools.org/summer)
  • Select any other book (with parent approval).
  • Read it and complete the Choice Book questions (attached) in your own handwriting. (Also available to print at www.braintreeschools.org/summer)
  • These assignments should be completed before your return to school and will be graded for effort and completeness.
  • Turn in your written work to your English teacher in the fall.
  • Participate in the summer reading class activity in your English class.
  • Your passing or failing mark for summer reading will show via the Aspen X2 Student/Parent Portal.

As you read Counting by 7’s by Holly Goldberg Sloan, complete the written note-taking questions below on a separate piece of paper. All questions should be answered using at least 3 complete sentences. Your work should be handwritten, not typed. This assignment should be completed before your return to school and will be graded for effort and completeness.

All students should complete the following questions:

1. Choose one word to describe Willow and explain why it describes her best. Choose one word each for Dell, Pattie, Jairo, Mai and Quang-ha. Explain why the word describes each character best.

2. Willow’s counselor, Dell Duke, puts his students, and people in general, into categories. Do you think it is realistic that people can be put into simple categories? Assign labels to at least 3 kids and 3 adults in your school or in your life (family, clubs, teams). Are these fair labels? Why or why not? Explain.

In addition to numbers 1 & 2 (the questions for all students), students entering the PROFICIENT CLUSTER should answer the following question:

3. Willow receives help from many people following the death of her parents. However, Willow, in return, positively impacts the lives of the people helping her in return. Consider Dell, Pattie, Jairo, Mai and Quang-ha. First, describe how each character changes in the text. Then, discuss the role Willow played in each character’s development.

In addition to numbers 1 & 2 (the questions for all students), students entering the ADVANCED CLUSTER should answer the following questions:

4. The quote on the cover says, “If you’re lost, you might need to swim against the tide.” Within the context of the story, what does this quote mean? Use specific examples from the text that support your answer and that explain why the author chose this quote to put on the cover.

5. This book, Counting by 7s, could be described as a book about family, or friendships, or loss. It could also be described as being about labels, or outsiders, or change, or even, miracles. What do you think the book is about? Consider this story from your point of view. In a well-developed paragraph, and using evidence from the text to support your idea, explain what you think this story is about.

Choice Book Questions for Students Entering Grade 7 or 8

In addition to your required reading book, you will also read a book of your choice. You may select either a work of fiction or a work of non-fiction, and your choice should be approved by your parent. As you read your book, complete the written note-taking questions below on a separate piece of paper. Your work should be handwritten, not typed. This assignment should be completed before your return to school and will be graded for effort and completeness.

If you are entering a Proficient Cluster class next year, please complete #1-5.

If you are entering an Advanced Cluster class next year, please complete #1-4 & #6-7.

All students should complete the following questions:

1. List at least five important events and give a brief explanation of why each is important to the book.

2. What is the central conflict or major problem that characters/people face in the book? How is it resolved?

3. Discuss one choice one of the main characters or people made in the book. How did this choice change that character/person? How did it affect the story as a whole?

4. Choose a character or person from the book, pick a quality that describes him/her, and write one brief paragraph that includes an example of an event from the book that illustrates this quality.

In addition to numbers 1 through 4 (the questions for all students), students entering the PROFICIENT CLUSTER should answer the following questions:

5. Write a brief paragraph describing something you learned from the book. In other words, how did the author make you think; what is one idea, theme, or issue that you considered? What is the moral of the story or what is the book trying to teach its readers?

In addition to numbers 1 through 4 (the questions for all students), students entering the ADVANCED CLUSTER should answer the following questions:

6. Write a well-developed paragraph describing three things you learned from the book. In other words, how did the au-thor make you think; what ideas, themes, and issues did you consider? What is the moral of the story or what lessons is the book trying to teach its readers?

7. Copy this chart and complete it to demonstrate connections you’ve made using your choice reading book.

Text-to-Self Connections: How does a moment, character, or part of this book relate to your own life?
1.
2.
3.

Text-to-Text Connections: How can you con-nect this book to another book you’ve read?
1.
2.
3.

Text-to-World Connections: How does this book connect to something that happened or is happening in the real world?
1.
2.
3.


Grade 8

Dear Parents and Guardians:

I hope you and your student are enjoying the conclusion to a productive year with the Braintree Public Schools. Throughout the year, students have many opportunities to read and listen to books read aloud during the school day. Your support for those same reading experiences at home will help your child continue to grow as a reader, writer, thinker, and learner.

As you plan for the summer, please consider the literacy experiences your child will have in these months away from the classroom. Faculty members at East and South Middle Schools have selected Naoki Higashida’s The Reason I Jump for all incoming eighth graders to read over the summer. When school begins in the fall, all eighth grade English classes will participate in learning activities related to the book. In addition to The Reason I Jump, your son or daughter should read at least one other book. Any title you select together is a great choice!

The Reason I Jump is readily available locally or via online booksellers in hardcover or Kindle/Nook formats. In addition to local bookstores, the Thayer Public Library is a valuable (and free!) resource. If you need help in selecting more books, do not hesitate to ask the librarian!

For those of you planning travel this summer, consider going beyond the bookshelves and print pages to include audio books in your student’s experience. While audio books are no replacement for reading, they are a wonderful supplement, especially when experienced with a copy of the actual book. These are available at the library on CD or on iTunes.

As you explore The Reason I Jump and other books that interest your student, remember that summer reading is for pleasure! I hope you and your son or daughter find many enjoyable books and stories to be part of your summer. I look forward to working with you throughout your student’s middle school experience.

Sincerely,
Rock Roberts
Director of English & Reading, K-12
rroberts@braintreema.gov

All students entering grade 8 at East or South will read...

The Reason I Jump


The Reason I Jump

by Naoki Higashida, trans. KA Yoshida &
D. Mitchell



You’ve never read a book like The Reason I Jump. Written by a very smart, very self-aware, and very charming thirteen-year-old boy with autism, it is a one-of-a-kind memoir that demonstrates how an autistic mind thinks, feels, perceives, and responds in ways few of us can imagine. Using an alphabet grid to painstakingly construct words, sentences, and thoughts that he is unable to speak out loud, Naoki answers even the most delicate questions that people want to know. Questions such as: “Why do people with autism talk so loudly and weirdly?” “Why do you line up your toy cars and blocks?” “Why don’t you make eye contact when you’re talking?” and “What’s the reason you jump?” (Naoki’s answer: “When I’m jumping, it’s as if my feelings are going upward to the sky.”) With disarming honesty and a generous heart, Naoki shares his unique point of view on not only autism but life itself. His insights—into the mystery of words, the wonders of laughter, and the elusiveness of memory—are so startling, so strange, and so powerful that you will never look at the world the same way again.
- edited and adapted from
www.amazon.com

Students should also select a second book (with parent approval!) to read before the start of the year. The instructions for short written responses to each book are below.

Steps to a Complete Summer Reading Assignment for Students Entering Grade 8:

  • Get your copy of The Reason I Jump—from the library, a local bookseller, or an online store.
  • Read it and answer the questions about The Reason I Jump (at right) in your own handwriting on a separate sheet of paper. (Sheets available to fill in at www.braintreeschools.org/summer.)
  • Select any other book (with parent approval).
  • Read it and complete the Choice Book questions (attached) in your own handwriting. (Also available to print at www.braintreeschools.org/summer.)
  • These assignments should be completed before your return to school and will be graded for effort and completeness.
  • Turn in your written work to your English teacher in the fall.
  • Participate in the summer reading class activity in your English class.
  • Your passing or failing mark for summer reading will show via the Aspen X2 Student/Parent Portal.

As you read THE REASON I JUMP by Naoki Higashida, complete the written note-taking questions below on a separate piece of paper. Your work should be handwritten, not typed. This assignment should be completed before your return to school and will be graded for effort and completeness.

This book is divided into Questions and Stories.

All students should complete the following questions about the Questions:

1. What does Higashida say is difficult about communicating with autism? Find three quotations from different Questions and explain how each shows a difficulty in communication for a person with autism.

2. According to Higashida, how are people with autism treated unfairly? Find three quotations from different Questions and explain how each shows someone with autism being treated unfairly.

3. What new information did you learn about autism through reading the book? Find at least three quotations from different Questions and explain the new knowledge you learned from each.

In addition to numbers 1, 2, & 3 (the questions for all students), students entering the PROFICIENT CLUSTER should answer the following question about the Stories.

4. Write a paragraph explaining how Higashida discusses his autism in the Stories. Develop your paragraph by finishing the partially completed graphic organizer on the next page. Make sure that all the boxes are filled in!

In addition to numbers 1, 2, & 3 (the questions for all students), students entering the ADVANCED CLUSTER should answer the following questions.

5. Several times throughout the book Higashida talks about feeling guilty for having autism. Find at least three quotations from different Questions and explain how they show the author’s feelings of guilt.

6. Using three or more quotations from the list on the next page, write a paragraph explaining how Higashida discusses his autism in the Stories.

Graphic Organizer for Students Entering the PROFICIENT CLUSTER

Graphic Organizer

See link below for a printable version.

Quotations for Students Entering the ADVANCED CLUSTER

A. “The Hare dashed away at terrific speed. The Tortoise slipped and flipped over onto his back, at which all the other animals ran up to the Tortoise to see if he was all right: ‘Poor you, are you okay? You’d better go home and rest.’ And so they all carried the Tortoise back to his house. The Hare reached the finish line. Nobody was waiting but himself” (95).

B. “All human beings have their hardships to bear, so never swerve away from the path you’re on” (193).

C. “So this here is Space I’m standing in. But what do I do now? How am I supposed to live when I don’t even have a body?” (250).

D. “Earthling: Don’t you feel weighed down? It feels as if I’ve got weights strapped to my arms and legs. Autisman: Ah, but on your planet, I always feel as if I’m swimming around in space, weightlessly. Earthling: Okay. Now I understand you. I really understand” (117).

E. “’But all paths are one connected path.’ The white dove looked taken aback by this unexpected answer. But after a time, she smiled. ‘How about that? So the path I’ve been searching for all this time is the path I am already on.’ In excellent spirits, the white dove flew off, up into the blue sky. Then the black crow, too, turned his head skyward, then flapped his wings vigorously, and away he flew. And the black crow looked no less perfect against the deep blue than the white dove” (215).

You may also select any other quotations from the Stories!

Choice Book Questions for Students Entering Grade 7 or 8

In addition to your required reading book, you will also read a book of your choice. You may select either a work of fiction or a work of non-fiction, and your choice should be approved by your parent. As you read your book, complete the written note-taking questions below on a separate piece of paper. Your work should be handwritten, not typed. This assignment should be completed before your return to school and will be graded for effort and completeness.

If you are entering a Proficient Cluster class next year, please complete #1-5.

If you are entering an Advanced Cluster class next year, please complete #1-4 & #6-7.

All students should complete the following questions:

1. List at least five important events and give a brief explanation of why each is important to the book.

2. What is the central conflict or major problem that characters/people face in the book? How is it resolved?

3. Discuss one choice one of the main characters or people made in the book. How did this choice change that character/person? How did it affect the story as a whole?

4. Choose a character or person from the book, pick a quality that describes him/her, and write one brief paragraph that includes an example of an event from the book that illustrates this quality.

In addition to numbers 1 through 4 (the questions for all students), students entering the PROFICIENT CLUSTER should answer the following questions:

5. Write a brief paragraph describing something you learned from the book. In other words, how did the author make you think; what is one idea, theme, or issue that you considered? What is the moral of the story or what is the book trying to teach its readers?

In addition to numbers 1 through 4 (the questions for all students), students entering the ADVANCED CLUSTER should answer the following questions:

6. Write a well-developed paragraph describing three things you learned from the book. In other words, how did the au-thor make you think; what ideas, themes, and issues did you consider? What is the moral of the story or what lessons is the book trying to teach its readers?

7. Copy this chart and complete it to demonstrate connections you’ve made using your choice reading book.

Text-to-Self Connections: How does a moment, character, or part of this book relate to your own life?
1.
2.
3.

Text-to-Text Connections: How can you con-nect this book to another book you’ve read?
1.
2.
3.

Text-to-World Connections: How does this book connect to something that happened or is happening in the real world?
1.
2.
3.


Grade 9

Dear Parents and Guardians:

Reading and writing in the 21st century classroom is an interdisciplinary effort. Students read and write in all disciplines, but they have particularly extended and frequent opportunities to do so in English, the sciences, and social studies.

Summer reading at the high school level encompasses these three disciplines. Over the course of each student’s high school experience, he or she will select from summer reading lists that encourage reading for enjoyment and education, while addressing some of the “big questions” that surface in these three subjects areas and in adult life.

The books selected for each grade represent a variety of interests and reading levels. Print copies are readily available locally or via online booksellers. In addition to local bookstores, the Thayer Public Library is a valuable (and free!) resource. If you need help in selecting books, do not hesitate to ask the librarian!

For those of you planning travel this summer, consider going beyond the bookshelves and print pages to include audio books in your student’s experience. While audio books are not a replacement for reading, they are a wonderful supplement, especially when experienced with a copy of the actual book. Audio books are available at the library on CD or on iTunes.

As you explore these opportunities and the “big question” for the summer, remember that summer reading is for pleasure! We hope you and your son or daughter find many enjoyable books and stories to be part of your summer. We look forward to working with you throughout your student’s high school career.

Sincerely,
Rock Roberts, Director of English & Reading, rroberts@braintreema.gov

Dr. Gorman Lee, Director of Social Studies, glee@braintreema.gov

Dr. Betsey Clifford, Director of Science, bclifford@braintreema.gov

The Big Question: To what degree can one person make a difference?

Inkheart

Inkheart
by Cornelia Funke

Between Shades of Gray


Between Shades of Gray§
by Ruta Sepetys

Ellen Foster


Ellen Foster§
by Kay Gibbons

My Name is Asher Lev

My Name is Asher Lev
by Chaim Potok

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
by Douglas Adams

Tuesdays with Morrie

Tuesdays with Morrie
by Mitch Albom

Red Kayak


Red Kayak
by Priscilla Cummings

Shatter Me


Shatter Me
by Tahereh Mafi

Romiette and Julio


Romiette and Julio
by Sharon Draper

Profiles in Courage


Profiles in Courage
by John F. Kennedy


Looking for great books? Interested in logging your reading hours for a prize?

Visit thayerpubliclibraryteens.blogspot.com and www.thayerpubliclibrary.org.

§ This book was written for adults or young adults and contains some mature language and/or content.

Steps to a Complete Summer Reading Assignment for Students Entering Grade 9:

  • Select one book from the ten choices.
  • Read it and complete the Note-Taking Chart for the Grade 9 Big Question.

Can one person change his community?
The world?
Another person?

Complete the chart below using the book you selected from the list for 9th graders.

Evidence that one person CAN make a big difference

1.
2.
3.

Evidence that one person CANNOT always make a big difference
1.
2.
3.

Weigh your evidence and answer the question: To what degree can one person make a difference?

  • Select any other book (with parent approval).
  • Read it and complete the Note-Taking Questions below.

1. Select, from your book, five words that are new to you. Copy the words and the sentences or phrases in which they appear. Define each word (using a dictionary, online resource, or your own knowledge of context and roots).

2. List at least five important points, events, or facts from the book, and give a one- or two-sentence explanation of why each is important to the book.

3. Copy (or print) this chart and complete it to demonstrate connections you’ve made using your choice reading book.

Text-to-Self Connections: How does a moment, character, or part of this book relate to your own life?
1.
2.
3.

Text-to-Text Connections: How can you connect this book to another book or article you’ve read?
1.
2.
3.

Text-to-World Connections: How does this book connect to something that happened or is happening in the real world?
1.
2.
3.

  • Turn in your written work to your English teacher in the fall.
  • Participate in the summer reading class activity in your English class.
  • Your passing or failing mark for summer reading will show via the Aspen X2 Student/Parent Portal.


Once you’ve seen the assignment, you can use these links to print larger versions of the questions and charts for your answers: Note-Taking Chart for the Grade 9 Big Question & Note-Taking Questions for a book of your choice for all high school students.


Printable Version of Grade 9 Summer Reading Materials Available Here.

InkheartInkheart
by Cornelia Funke

Characters from books literally leap off the page in this engrossing fantasy. Meggie, 12, has had her father to herself since her mother went away when she was young. Mo taught her to read when she was five, and the two share a mutual love of books. Things change after a visit from a scarred man who calls himself Dustfinger and who refers to Mo as Silvertongue. Meggie learns that her father has been keeping secrets. He can "read" characters out of books. When she was three, he read aloud from a book called Inkheart and released Dustfinger and other characters into the real world. At the same time, Meggie's mother disappeared into the story. This "story within a story" will delight not just fantasy fans, but all readers who like an exciting plot with larger-than-life characters.

My Name is Asher LevMy Name is Asher Lev
by Chaim Potok

In this stirring and often visionary novel, Chaim Potok traces Asher’s passage between two identities, the one consecrated to God, the other subject only to the imagination. Asher Lev grows up in a cloistered Hasidic community in postwar Brooklyn, a world suffused by ritual and revolving around a charismatic Rebbe. But in time his gift [artistic talent] threatens to estrange him from that world and the parents he adores. As it follows his struggle, My Name Is Asher Lev becomes a luminous portrait of the artist, by turns heartbreaking and exultant, a modern classic.

Ellen FosterEllen Foster §
by Kay Gibbons

Ellen Foster is an 11-year-old who has been dealt a rotten hand in life. Her early childhood is spent with a sickly mother and an alcoholic and abusive father. After her mother commits suicide (or is it murder?), Ellen goes to live alone with her father, doing the best she can to avoid being abused. When the courts finally take action, she is sent to live with her grandmother, a bitter and spiteful woman. Yet when her grandmother dies, Ellen manages to take charge of her own life. This beautifully written story, compelling in its innocence, is sweet, funny, and sad.

Tuesdays with MorrieTuesdays with Morrie
by Mitch Albom

This true story about the love between a spiritual mentor and his pupil has soared to the bestseller list for many reasons. For starters: it reminds us of the affection and gratitude that many of us still feel for the significant mentors of our past. It also plays out a fantasy many of us have entertained: what would it be like to look those people up again, tell them how much they meant to us, maybe even resume the mentorship?

Shatter MeShatter Me
by Tahereh Mafi

No one knows why Juliette's touch is fatal, but The Reestablishment has plans for her. Plans to use her as a weapon. But Juliette has plans of her own. After a lifetime without freedom, she's finally discovering a strength to fight back for the very first time—and to find a future with the one boy she thought she'd lost forever. In this electrifying debut, Tahereh Mafi presents a riveting dystopian world, a thrilling superhero story, and an unforgettable heroine.

Between Shades of Gray

Between Shades of Gray §
by Ruta Sepetys

Lina is just like any other fifteen-year-old Lithuanian girl in 1941. She paints, she draws, she gets crushes on boys. Until one night when Soviet officers barge into her home, tearing her family from the comfortable life they've known. Separated from her father, forced onto a crowded and dirty train car, Lina, her mother, and her young brother slowly make their way north, crossing the Arctic Circle, to a work camp in the coldest reaches of Siberia. Here they are forced, under Stalin's orders, to dig for beets and fight for their lives under the cruelest of conditions. Lina finds solace in her art, meticulously-and at great risk-documenting events by drawing, hoping these messages will make their way to her father's prison camp to let him know they are still alive…. Between Shades of Gray is a novel that will steal your breath and capture your heart.

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the GalaxyThe Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
by Douglas Adams

Join Douglas Adams's hapless hero Arthur Dent as he travels the galaxy with his intrepid pal Ford Prefect, getting into horrible messes and generally wreaking hilarious havoc. Dent is grabbed from Earth moments before a cosmic construction team obliterates the planet to build a freeway. You'll never read funnier science fiction; Adams is a master of intelligent satire, barbed wit, and comedic dialogue. The Hitchhiker's Guide is rich in comedic detail and thought-provoking situations and stands up to multiple reads. Required reading for science fiction fans, this book (and its follow-ups) is also sure to please fans of Monty Python, Terry Pratchett's Discworld series, and British sitcoms.

Romiette and JulioRomiette and Julio
by Sharon Draper

A contemporary retelling of the Romeo and Juliet story. Sixteen-year-old Julio Montague's parents have moved their family to Cincinnati, OH, in order to get their son out of his gang-ridden high school in Corpus Christi, TX. Romiette Cappelle, also 16, is the daughter of successful African-American parents and the granddaughter of college professors. When these two young people, both from proud heritages, begin a romance, they must deal not only with their parents' prejudices but also with the threats of a local gang called The Family.

Red KayakRed Kayak
by Priscilla Cummings

In this satisfying crime and coming-of-age drama, Brady’s friends commit a mean-spirited prank -- but no one was supposed to die. What happens now? Revealing the terrible secret would implicate Brady's friends in the drowning, and it clouds his whole world with guilt and fear. Cummings’s works plot and characterizations skillfully, building suspense as the evidence unfolds and as Brady wrestles with his decision and tries to come to terms with his own responsibility.

Profiles in CourageProfiles in Courage
by John F. Kennedy

In 1954-55 a freshman U.S. Senator from Massachusetts wrote a book profiling eight of his historical Senatorial colleagues, such men as John Quincy Adams, Sam Houston, and Robert A. Taft. Instead of focusing on their storied careers, John F. Kennedy chose to illustrate their acts of integrity, when they stood alone against tremendous political and social pressure for what they felt was right.

Images and editorial reviews were copied, edited, or adapted from www.amazon.com.

§ This book was written for adults or young adults and contains some mature language and/or content.

Grade 10

Dear Parents and Guardians:

Reading and writing in the 21st century classroom is an interdisciplinary effort. Students read and write in all disciplines, but they have particularly extended and frequent opportunities to do so in English, the sciences, and social studies.

Summer reading at the high school level encompasses these three disciplines. Over the duration of each student’s high school experience, he or she will select from summer reading lists that encourage reading for enjoyment and education, while addressing some of the “big questions” that surface in these three subjects areas and in adult life.

The books selected for each grade represent a variety of interests and reading levels. Print copies are readily available locally or via online booksellers. In addition to local bookstores, the Thayer Public Library is a valuable (and free!) resource. If you need help in selecting books, do not hesitate to ask the librarian!

For those of you planning travel this summer, consider going beyond the bookshelves and print pages to include audio books in your student’s experience. While audio books are not a replacement for reading, they are a wonderful supplement, especially when experienced with a copy of the actual book. Audio books are available at the library on CD or on iTunes.

As you explore these opportunities and the “big question” for the summer, remember that summer reading is for pleasure! We hope you and your son or daughter find many enjoyable books and stories to be part of your summer. We look forward to working with you throughout your student’s high school career.

Sincerely,
Rock Roberts, Director of English & Reading, rroberts@braintreema.gov

Dr. Gorman Lee, Director of Social Studies, glee@braintreema.gov

Dr. Betsey Clifford, Director of Science, K-12 bclifford@braintreema.gov

The Big Question: What is our role in the natural world?

Flu


Flu
by Gina Kolata

The Stuff of Life


The Stuff of Life §
by Mark Schultz

A Pearl in the Storm


A Pearl in the Storm
by Tori Murden McClure

The Demon in the Freezer


The Demon in the Freezer §
By Richard Preston

Alex & Me


Alex & Me
by Irene Pepperberg

The Man Who Lives with Wolves


The Man Who Lives with Wolves
by Shaun Ellis with Penny Junor

100 Heartbeats


100 Heartbeats
by Jeff Corwin

The Sixth Extinction


The Sixth Extinction
by Elizabth Kolbert

Physics for Future Presidents
Physics for Future Presidents
by Richard A. Muller

Going Blue


Going Blue
by Cathryn Berger Kaye
& Philippe Cousteau


Looking for great books? Interested in logging your reading hours for a prize?

Visit thayerpubliclibraryteens.blogspot.com and www.thayerpubliclibrary.org.

§ This book was written for adults or young adults and contains some mature language and/or content.

Steps to a complete summer reading assignment for students entering grade 10*:

  • Select one book from the ten choices on the flyer (more details available at www.braintreeschools.org/summer).
  • Read it and complete the Note-Taking Chart (below) for the Grade 10 Big Question.

As humans, what is our role in the natural world? Do we hold a unique position, standing above and controlling the rest of the natural world, or are we enmeshed within nature’s complex web of interactions? Are we obligated to act as caretakers for the future, or are natural resources here for us to use as we want? As humans become aware of and immersed in the natural world, they often find it to be more complex than it might first appear.

As you read, focus on the characters’ interactions with the natural world. Copy the chart below (or print it from the link below) and complete it using the book you selected.

Moments in the book when a person or character interacted with or acted upon the natural world (changes to the world that the person/character made or moments when the person/character challenged nature)
1.
2.
3.

Nature’s responses to those actions or challenges
1.
2.
3.

Evaluate your evidence and answer the question: As humans, what is our role in the natural world?

  • Select any other book (with parent approval).
  • Read it and complete the Note-Taking Questions (below). The charts can be printed from the link below.

1. Select, from your book, five words that are new to you. Copy the words and the sentences or phrases in which they appear. Define each word (using a dictionary, online resource, or your own knowledge of context and roots).

2. List at least five important points, events, or facts from the book, and give a one- or two-sentence explanation of why each is important to the book.

3. Copy or print this chart and complete it to demonstrate connections you’ve made using your choice reading book.

Text-to-Self Connections: How does a moment, character, or part of this book relate to your own life?
1.
2.
3.

Text-to-Text Connections: How can you connect this book to another book or article you’ve read?
1.
2.
3.

Text-to-World Connections: How does this book connect to something that happened or is happening in the real world?
1.
2.
3.

  • Turn in your written work to your Science teacher in the fall.
  • Participate in the summer reading class activity in your Science class.
  • Your passing or failing mark for summer reading will show via the Aspen X2 Student/Parent Portal.
Flu: The Story of the Great Influenza Pandemic

Flu: The Story of the Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918 and the Search for the Virus that Caused It
by Gina Kolata

In Flu, Gina Kolata, an acclaimed reporter for The New York Times, unravels the mystery of a lethal virus with the high drama of a great adventure story. From Alaska to Norway, from the streets of Hong Kong to the corridors of the White House, Kolata tracks the race to recover the live pathogen and probes the fear that has impelled government policy. A gripping work of science writing, Flu addresses the prospects for a great epidemic’s recurrence and considers what can be done to prevent it.

The Stuff of Life

The Stuff of Life: A Graphic Guide to Genetics and DNA
by Mark Schultz, Zander Cannon & Kevin Cannon

Let’s face it: From adenines to zygotes, from cytokinesis to parthenogenesis, even the basics of genetics can sound utterly alien. So who better than an alien to explain it all? Enter Bloort 183, a scientist from an alien race threatened by disease. In the hands of the award-winning writer Mark Schultz, Bloort's explanations give even the most science-phobic reader a complete introduction to the history and science of genetics.

A Pearl in the Storm

A Pearl in the Storm: How I Found My Heart in the Middle of the Ocean
by Tori Murden McClure

Growing up a self-proclaimed misfit, Tori Murden McClure was haunted by guilt over being unable to protect her developmentally handicapped brother from the world's cruelty. She cared fiercely about humanity but was emotionally isolated and blamed herself for failing to save the world. Driven to overcome this self-perceived weakness, 35-year-old McClure departed from the coast of North Carolina in 1998, planning to row the 3,600 miles to France. Within days she lost all communication with shore but decided to forge ahead — not knowing that 1998 would turn out to be the worst hurricane season on record in the North Atlantic.

The Man Who Lives with Wolves

The Man Who Lives with Wolves
by Shaun Ellis with Penny Junor

What would compel a man to place himself in constant danger in order to become a member of a wolf pack? To eat with them, putting his head into a carcass alongside the wolves' gnashing teeth? To play, hunt, and spar with them, suffering bruises and bites? To learn their language so his howl is indistinguishable from theirs? To give up a normal life of relationships and family so that he can devote himself completely to the protection of these wild animals? In The Man Who Lives with Wolves, Shaun Ellis reveals how his life irrevocably changed the first time he set eyes on a wolf. In exhilarating prose, he takes us from his upbringing in the wilds of Norfolk, England, to his survival training with British Army Special Forces to the Nez Percé Indian lands in Idaho, where he first ran with a wolf pack for nearly two years.

100 Heartbeats

100 Heartbeats: The Race to Save Earth’s Most Endangered Species
by Jeff Corwin

Popular television host Jeff Corwin takes readers on a gripping journey around the world to meet the animals threatened by extinction. From the forests slipping away beneath the stealthy paws of the Florida panther, to the giant panda’s plight to climb ever higher in the mountains of China, Corwin takes you on a global tour to witness firsthand the critical state of our natural world. Along the way, he shares inspiring stories of battles being waged and won by the conservationists on the front lines of defense.

The Demon in the Freezer

The Demon in the Freezer §by Richard Preston

The first major bioterror event in the United States-the anthrax attacks in October 2001-was a clarion call for scientists who work with “hot” agents to find ways of protecting civilian populations against biological weapons. Richard Preston takes us into the heart of Usamriid, the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases at Fort Detrick, Maryland, once the headquarters of the U.S. biological weapons program and now the epicenter of national biodefense. Peter Jahrling, the top scientist at Usamriid, is leading a team of scientists doing controversial experiments with live smallpox virus at CDC. Preston takes us into the lab where Jahrling is reawakening smallpox and explains, with cool and devastating precision, what may be at stake if his last bold experiment fails.

Alex & Me

Alex & Me: How a Scientist and a Parrot Discovered a Hidden World of Animal Intelligence – and Formed a Deep Bond in the Process
by Irene Pepperberg

Alex & Me is the remarkable true account of an amazing, irascible parrot and his best friend who stayed together through thick and thin for thirty years—the astonishing, moving, and unforgettable story of a landmark scientific achievement and a beautiful relationship.

Physics for Future Presidents

Physics for Future Presidents: The Science Behind the Headlines
by Richard A. Muller

What should the president do if a "dirty" radioactive bomb were exploded in an American city? Is it safe to build nuclear reactors to provide clean energy? And what do we truly know about global warming? In this presidential primer, MacArthur fellow and UC-Berkeley physicist Muller ranges from terrorism to space exploration to global warming, offering basic information and countering myths.

Going Blue

Going Blue: A Teen Guide to Saving Our Oceans, Lakes, Rivers & Wetlands
by Cathryn Berger Kaye & Philippe Cousteau

Co-written by Jacques Cousteau’s grandson, this broad-reaching call to action introduces basic concepts about global water protection and what teens can do to help. Each packed spread combines clearly explained scientific concepts with lists, diagrams, and eye-opening statistics, such as a chart that lists how much water is required to make everyday items, from a sheet of paper (2 gallons) to a cotton T-shirt (700 gallons). The color photos deliver a high impact; for example, with contrasting images of a coral reef, first bursting with vibrant color, then bleached by rising ocean temperatures into an underwater ghost world. With a balance of sobering facts and inspiring accounts of communities creating real change, this welcome title will attract a broad range of student researchers, casual readers, and committed activists.

The Sixth Extinction

The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History
by Elizabeth Kolbert

Kolbert introduces us to a dozen species, some already gone, others facing extinction, including the Panamian golden frog, staghorn coral, the great auk, and the Sumatran rhino. Through these stories, Kolbert provides a moving account of the disappearances occurring all around us and traces the evolution of extinction as a concept, from its first articulation by Georges Cuvier in revolutionary Paris up through the present day. The sixth extinction is likely to be mankind's most lasting legacy; as Kolbert observes, it compels us to rethink the fundamental question of what it means to be human.

Images and editorial reviews were copied, edited, or adapted from www.amazon.com.

§ This book was written for adults or young adults and contains some mature language and/or content.

Grade 11

Dear Parents and Guardians:

Reading and writing in the 21st century classroom is an interdisciplinary effort. Students read and write in all disciplines, but they have particularly extended and frequent opportunities to do so in English, the sciences, and the social studies.

Summer reading at the high school level encompasses these three disciplines. Over the duration of each student’s high school experience, he or she will select from summer reading lists that encourage reading for enjoyment and education, while addressing some of the “big questions” that surface in these three subjects areas and in adult life.

The books selected for each grade represent a variety of interests and reading levels. Print copies are readily available locally or via online booksellers. In addition to local bookstores, the Thayer Public Library is a valuable (and free) resource. If you need help in selecting books, do not hesitate to ask the librarian!

For those of you planning travel this summer, consider going beyond the bookshelves and print pages to include audio books in your student’s experience. While audio books are not a replacement for reading, they are a wonderful supplement, especially when experienced with a copy of the actual book. Audio books are available at the library on CD or on iTunes.

As you explore these opportunities and the “big question” for the summer, remember that summer reading is for pleasure! We hope you and your son or daughter find many enjoyable books and stories to be part of your summer. We look forward to working with you throughout your student’s high school career.

Sincerely,

Rock Roberts, Director of English & Reading, rroberts@braintreema.gov

Dr. Gorman Lee, Director of Social Studies, glee@braintreema.gov

Dr. Betsey Clifford, Director of Science, K-12 bclifford@braintreema.gov

The Big Question: How should our past experiences shape our common future?

The Things They Carried


The Things They Carried §
by Tim O’Brien

The Audacity of Hope


The Audacity of Hope
by Barack Obama

Killing Kennedy


Killing Kennedy
by Bill O’Reilly

Unbroken


Unbroken §
by Laura Hillenbrand

March


MARCH
by John Lewis

I Am Malala


I Am Malala
by Malala Yousafzai and
Christina Lamb

Murder in the High Himalayas


Murder in the High Himalayas §
by Jonathan Green

American Sniper


American Sniper §
by Chris Kyle


Lies My Teacher Told Me

Lies My Teacher Told Me
by James W. Lowen

Adventure Capitalist


Adventure Capitalist
by Jim Rogers


Looking for great books? Interested in logging your reading hours for a prize? Visit thayerpubliclibraryteens.blogspot.com and www.thayerpubliclibrary.org.

§ This book was written for adults or young adults and contains some mature language and/or content.

Steps to a Complete Summer Reading Assignment for Students Entering Grade 11*:

  • Select one book from the ten choices on the flyer (more details available at www.braintreeschools.org/summer).
  • Read it and complete the Note-Taking Chart (below) for the Grade 11 Big Question.

Diverse people, ideas, and experiences have shaped the American identity. How should these past experiences shape our common future?

Choose a book from the list for 11th graders. As you read, focus on moments and events that should affect our future decisions as people, as a community, and as a nation. Copy the chart below and complete it using the book you selected.

Events from the book: Choose moments or events that represent the time, place, or culture in the story.
1.
2.
3.

Implications for the future: How do the moments/events you chose affect future actions?
1.
2.
3.

Evaluate your examples and answer the question: How should these past experiences shape our common future?

* Students entering Grade 11 AP US History should complete the assigned summer work associated with that course instead of this school-wide assignment.

  • Select any other book (with parent approval).
  • Read it and complete the Note-Taking Questions (below). The charts can be printed from the link below.

1. Select, from your book, five words that are new to you. Copy the words and the sentences or phrases in which they appear. Define each word (using a dictionary, online resource, or your own knowledge of context and roots).

2. List at least five important points, events, or facts from the book, and give a one- or two-sentence explanation of why each is important to the book.

3. Copy or print this chart and complete it to demonstrate connections you’ve made using your choice reading book.

Text-to-Self Connections: How does a moment, character, or part of this book relate to your own life?
1.
2.
3.

Text-to-Text Connections: How can you connect this book to another book or article you’ve read?
1.
2.
3.

Text-to-World Connections: How does this book connect to something that happened or is happening in the real world?
1.
2.
3.

  • Turn in your written work to your Social Studies teacher in the fall.
  • Participate in the summer reading class activity in your Social Studies class.
  • Your passing or failing mark for summer reading will show via the Aspen X2 Student/Parent Portal.
The Things They Carried

The Things They Carried §
by Tim O’Brien

A classic work of American literature that has not stopped changing minds and lives since it burst onto the literary scene, The Things They Carried is a ground-breaking meditation on war, memory, imagination, and the redemptive power of storytelling. Every story in The Things They Carried speaks another truth that Tim O'Brien learned in Vietnam; it is this blurred line between truth and reality, fact and fiction, that makes his book unforgettable.

The Audacity of Hope

The Audacity of Hope: Thoughts on Reclaiming the American Dream
by Barak Obama

The Audacity of Hope is Barack Obama's call for a new kind of politics that builds upon those shared understandings that pull us together as Americans. Lucid in his vision of America's place in the world, refreshingly candid about his family life and his time in the Senate, Obama here sets out his political convictions and inspires us to trust in the dogged optimism that has long defined us and that is our best hope going forward.

Killing Kennedy

Killing Kennedy: The End of Camelot
by Bill O’Reilly
& Martin Dugard

A riveting historical narrative of the shocking events surrounding the assassination of John F. Kennedy. In the midst of a 1963 campaign trip to Texas, Kennedy is gunned down by an erratic young drifter named Lee Harvey Oswald. The former Marine Corps sharpshooter escapes the scene, only to be caught and shot dead while in police custody.

The events leading up to the most notorious crime of the twentieth century are almost as shocking as the assassination itself. Killing Kennedy chronicles both the heroism and deceit of Camelot, bringing history to life in ways that will profoundly move the reader.

I Am Malala

I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban
by Malala Yousafzai and Christina Lamb

When the Taliban took control of the Swat Valley in Pakistan, one girl spoke out. Malala Yousafzai refused to be silenced and fought for her right to an education. On Tuesday, October 9, 2012, when she was fifteen, she almost paid the ultimate price. She was shot in the head at point-blank range while riding the bus home from school, and few expected her to survive. Instead, Malala's miraculous recovery has taken her on an extraordinary journey from a remote valley in northern Pakistan to the halls of the United Nations in New York. At sixteen, she has become a global symbol of peaceful protest and the youngest nominee ever for the Nobel Peace Prize.

American Sniper

American Sniper §
by Chris Kyle, Scott McEwen & Jim DeFelice

Gripping, eye-opening, and powerful, American Sniper is the astonishing autobiography of SEAL Chief Chris Kyle, who is the record-holding sniper in U.S. military history. Kyle has more than 150 officially confirmed kills (the previous American record was 109), though his remarkable career total has not been made public by the Pentagon.

In this New York Times bestselling memoir, Kyle shares the true story of his extraordinary decade-long career, including his multiple combat tours in Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom) and elsewhere from 1999-2009.

Unbroken

Unbroken §
by Laura Hillenbrand

On a May afternoon in 1943, an Army Air Forces bomber crashed into the Pacific Ocean and disappeared, leaving only a spray of debris and a slick of oil, gasoline, and blood. Then, on the ocean surface, a face appeared. It was that of a young lieutenant, the plane’s bombardier, who was struggling to a life raft and pulling himself aboard. So began one of the most extraordinary odysseys of the Second World War. Laura Hillenbrand writes with the same rich and vivid narrative voice she displayed in Seabiscuit. Telling an unforgettable story of a man’s journey into extremity, Unbroken is a testament to the resilience of the human mind, body, and spirit.

March

MARCH
by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin & Nate Powell

March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis' lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis' personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement. Many years ago, John Lewis and other student activists drew inspiration from the 1958 comic book "Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story." Now, his own comics bring those days to life for a new audience, testifying to a movement whose echoes will be heard for generations.

Lies My Teacher Told MeLies My Teacher Told Me
by James W. Lowen

This updated and revised edition of the American Book Award-winner and national bestseller revitalizes the truth of America’s history, explores how myths continue to be perpetrated, and includes a new chapter on 9/11 and the Iraq War. Thought provoking, nonpartisan, and often shocking, Loewen unveils the real America in this iconoclastic classic beloved by high school teachers, history buffs, and enlightened citizens across the country.

Murder in the High Himalaya

Murder in the High Himalaya§
by Jonathan Green

On September 30, 2006 gunfire echoed through the thin air near Advance Base Camp on Cho Oyu Mountain. Frequented by thousands of climbers each year, Cho Oyu lies nineteen miles east of Mt. Everest on the border between Tibet and Nepal. To the elite mountaineering community, it offers a straightforward summit—a warm-up climb to her formidable sister. To Tibetans, Cho Oyu promises a gateway to freedom through a secret glacial path: the Nangpa La. Murder in the High Himalaya is the unforgettable account of the brutal killing of Kelsang Namtso—a seventeen-year-old Tibetan nun fleeing to India—by Chinese border guards. Witnessed by dozens of Western climbers, Kelsang’s death sparked an international debate over China’s savage oppression of Tibet. Adventure reporter Jonathan Green has gained rare entrance into this shadow-land at the rooftop of the world. In his affecting portrait of modern Tibet, Green raises enduring questions about morality and the lengths we go to achieve freedom.

Adventure Capitalist

Adventure Capitalist
by Jim Rogers

Behind the wheel of a sunburst-yellow, custom-built convertible Mercedes, Rogers and his fiancée, Paige Parker, began their “Millennium Adventure” on January 1, 1999, from Iceland. They traveled through 116 countries, including many where most have rarely ventured, such as Saudi Arabia, Myanmar, Angola, Sudan, Congo, Colombia, and East Timor. They drove through war zones, deserts, jungles, epidemics, and blizzards. They had many narrow escapes. They camped with nomads and camels in the western Sahara. They ate silkworms, iguanas, snakes, termites, guinea pigs, porcupines, crocodiles, and grasshoppers. Best of all, they saw the real world from the ground up—the only vantage point from which it can be truly understood—economically, politically, and socially.

Images and editorial reviews were copied, edited, or adapted from www.amazon.com.

§ This book was written for adults or young adults and contains some mature language and/or content.

Grade 12

Dear Parents and Guardians:

Reading and writing in the 21st century classroom is an interdisciplinary effort. Students read and write in all disciplines, but they have particularly extended and frequent opportunities to do so in English, the sciences, and social studies.

Summer reading at the high school level encompasses these three disciplines. Over the duration of each student’s high school experience, he or she will select from summer reading lists that encourage reading for enjoyment and education, while addressing some of the “big questions” that surface in these three subjects areas and in adult life.

The books selected for each grade represent a variety of interests and reading levels. Print copies are readily available locally or via online booksellers. In addition to local bookstores, the Thayer Public Library is a valuable (and free) resource. If you need help in selecting books, do not hesitate to ask the librarian!

For those of you planning travel this summer, consider going beyond the bookshelves and print pages to include audio books in your student’s experience. While audio books are not a replacement for reading, they are a wonderful supplement, especially when experienced with a copy of the actual book. Audio books are available at the library on CD or on iTunes.

As you explore these opportunities and the “big question” for the summer, remember that summer reading is for pleasure! We hope you and your son or daughter find many enjoyable books and stories to be part of your summer. We look forward to working with you throughout your student’s high school career.

Sincerely,

Rock Roberts, Director of English & Reading, rroberts@braintreema.gov

Dr. Gorman Lee, Director of Social Studies, glee@braintreema.gov

Dr. Betsey Clifford, Director of Science, K-12 bclifford@braintreema.gov

The Big Question: How would you define an excellent education?

This Star Won't Go Out


This Star Won’t Go Out §
by Ester Earl

Feed


Feed §
by M.T. Anderson

Flash Boys


Flash Boys§
by Michael Lewis

The Alchemist


The Alchemist
by Paulo Coelho

Steal Like An Artist

Steal Like an Artist
by Austin Kleon

My Most Excellent Year


My Most Excellent Year§
by Steve Kluger

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian


The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian§
by Sherman Alexie

The Catcher in the Rye


The Catcher in the Rye §
by J.D. Salinger

A Fighter's Heart


A Fighter’s Heart §
by Sam Sheridan

The Glass Castle


The Glass Castle §
by Jeannette Walls


Looking for great books? Interested in logging your reading hours for a prize?
Visit thayerpubliclibraryteens.blogspot.com and www.thayerpubliclibrary.org.

§ This book was written for adults or young adults and contains some mature language and/or content.

Steps to a Complete Summer Reading Assignment for Students Entering Grade 12*:

  • Select one book from the ten choices on the flyer (more details available at www.braintreeschools.org/summer).
  • Read it and complete the Note-Taking Chart (below) for the Grade 12 Big Question.

How would you define an excellent education? Is it defined by straight As on a report card? Is it determined by the interests of the student? Is it determined by the knowledge society expects an educated adult to have?

Choose a book from the 12th grade list. As you read, consider the questions above. Copy the chart below and complete it for the book you have selected.

(You can use a character more than once as you seek three examples from the book.)

Character/person from the book
1.
2.
3.

His/her educational moment
1.
2.
3.

Was it excellent? (Y/N)
1.
2.
3.

Why?
1.
2.
3.

Weigh your evidence and answer the question: How would you define an excellent education?

(You can use a character more than once as you seek three examples from the book.)

  • Select any other book (with parent approval).
  • Read it and complete the Note-Taking Questions (below). The charts can be printed at www.braintreeschools.org/summer.

1. Select, from your book, five words that are new to you. Copy the words and the sentences or phrases in which they appear. Define each word (using a dictionary, online resource, or your own knowledge of context and roots).

2. List at least five important points, events, or facts from the book, and give a one- or two-sentence explanation of why each is important to the book.

3. Copy or print this chart and complete it to demonstrate connections you’ve made using your choice reading book.

Text-to-Self Connections: How does a moment, character, or part of this book relate to your own life?
1.
2.
3.

Text-to-Text Connections: How can you connect this book to another book or article you’ve read?
1.
2.
3.

Text-to-World Connections: How does this book connect to something that happened or is happening in the real world?
1.
2.
3.

  • Turn in your written work to your English teacher in the fall.
  • Participate in the summer reading class activity in your English class.
  • Your passing or failing mark for summer reading will show via the Aspen X2 Student/Parent Portal.

* Students entering Grade 12 AP English (AP Language or AP Literature) should complete the assigned summer work associated with that course instead of the school-wide assignment.

Once you’ve seen the assignment, use these links to print larger versions of the questions and charts for your answers: Note-Taking Chart for the Grade 12 Big Question & Note-Taking Questions for a book of your choice for all high school students.


Feed

Feed §
by M.T. Anderson

For Titus and his friends, it started out like any ordinary trip to the moon - a chance to party during spring break and play with some stupid low-grav at the Ricochet Lounge. But that was before the crazy hacker caused all their feeds to malfunction, sending them to the hospital to lie around with nothing inside their heads for days. And it was before Titus met Violet, a beautiful, brainy teenage girl who has decided to fight the feed and its omnipresent ability to categorize human thoughts and desires. Following in the footsteps of George Orwell, Anthony Burgess, and Kurt Vonnegut Jr., M. T. Anderson has created a not-so-brave new world — and a smart, savage satire that has captivated readers with its view of an imagined future that veers unnervingly close to the here and now.

This Star Won't Go Out

This Star Won’t Go Out§
by Ester Earl

In full color and illustrated with art and photographs, this is a collection of the journals, fiction, letters, and sketches of the late Esther Grace Earl, who passed away in 2010 at the age of 16. Essays by family and friends help to tell Esther’s story along with an introduction by award-winning author John Green who dedicated his #1 bestselling novel The Fault in Our Stars to her.

Steal Like An Artist

Steal Like an Artist
by Austin Kleon

You don’t need to be a genius, you just need to be yourself. That’s the message from Austin Kleon, a young writer and artist who knows that creativity is everywhere, creativity is for everyone. A manifesto for the digital age, Steal Like an Artist is a guide whose positive message, graphic look and illustrations, exercises, and examples will put readers directly in touch with their artistic side.

My Most Excellent Year

My Most Excellent Year§
by Steve Kluger

Set outside of Boston, this coming-of-age novel introduces the reader to three unforgettable characters: working-class T.C., who has fallen in love with the wealthy daughter of a diplomat; Alejandra, a high-school girl attempting to live a normal life despite her father’s high-profile job; and T.C.’s brother Augie, who is slowly realizing that he, too, has fallen in love, but with a boy. With alternating narration from each character’s perspective, this electrifying novel weaves together the most excellent year of three students, incorporating the Boston Red Sox, the truest sense of family, and the belief in something as simple as Mary Poppins, along the way.

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian§
by Sherman Alexie

Sherman Alexie tells the story of Junior, a budding cartoonist growing up on the Spokane Indian Reservation. Determined to take his future into his own hands, Junior leaves his troubled school on the rez to attend an all-white farm town high school where the only other Indian is the school mascot. Heartbreaking, funny, and beautifully written, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, which is based on the author's own experiences, coupled with poignant drawings that reflect the character's art, chronicles the contemporary adolescence of one Native American boy as he attempts to break away from the life he thought he was destined to live.

The Alchemist

The Alchemist
by Paulo Coelho,
trans. Alan R. Clarke

The Alchemist is the magical story of Santiago, an Andalusian shepherd boy who yearns to travel in search of a worldly treasure as extravagant as any ever found. From his home in Spain he journeys to the markets of Tangiers and across the Egyptian desert to a fateful encounter with the alchemist. Every few decades a book is published that changes the lives of its readers forever. The Alchemist is such a book. With over a million and a half copies sold around the world, The Alchemist has already established itself as a modern classic, universally admired. Paulo Coelho's charming fable, now available in English for the first time, will enchant and inspire an even wider audience of readers for generations to come

The Glass Castle

The Glass Castle §
by Jeannette Walls

Jeannette Walls grew up with parents whose ideals and stubborn nonconformity were both their curse and their salvation. As the dysfunction of the family escalated, Jeannette and her brother and sisters had to fend for themselves, supporting one another as they weathered their parents' betrayals and, finally, found the resources and will to leave home. Hers is a story of triumph against all odds, but also a tender, moving tale of unconditional love in a family that despite its profound flaws gave her the fiery determination to carve out a successful life on her own terms.

The Catcher in the Rye

The Catcher in the Rye§
by J.D. Salinger

Holden narrates the story of a couple of days in his sixteen-year-old life, just after he's been expelled from prep school. His constant wry observations about what he encounters, from teachers to phonies (the two of course are not mutually exclusive) capture the essence of the eternal teenage experience of alienation.

A Fighter's Heart

A Fighter’s Heart: One Man’s Journey through the World of Fighting§
by Sam Sheridan

In 1999, after a series of wildly adventurous jobs around the world, Sam Sheridan found himself in Australia, loaded with cash and intent on not working until he’d spent it all. It occurred to him that, without distractions, he could finally indulge a long-dormant obsession: fighting. Within a year, he was in Bangkok training with the greatest fighter in muay Thai (Thai kickboxing) history and stepping through the ropes for a professional bout. That one fight wasn’t enough. Sheridan set out to test himself on an epic journey into how and why we fight, facing Olympic boxers, Brazilian jiu-jitsu stars, and Ultimate Fighting champions. Along the way, Sheridan delivers an insightful look at violence as a career and a spectator sport, a behind-the-pageantry glimpse of athletes at the top of their terrifying game. A Fighter’s Heart is a dizzying first-hand account of what it’s like to reach the peak of finely disciplined personal aggression, to hit—and be hit.

Flash Boys

Flash Boys§
by Michael Lewis

Flash Boys is about a small group of Wall Street guys who figure out that the U.S. stock market has been rigged for the benefit of insiders and that, post–financial crisis, the markets have become not more free but less, and more controlled by the big Wall Street banks. Working at different firms, they come to this realization separately; but after they discover one another, the flash boys band together and set out to reform the financial markets. This they do by creating an exchange in which high-frequency trading—source of the most intractable problems—will have no advantage whatsoever.

Images and editorial were reviews copied, edited, or adapted from www.amazon.com.

§ This book was written for adults or young adults and contains some mature language and/or content.

AP Literature & Composition

AP Literature & Composition

Summer Reading Assignment 2017-2018

Mr. Jefferies, Room 275

Directions: You must complete all parts of this assignment. Each part must be completed by the assigned deadline. Things to consider:

  • The summer reading work will comprise a significant portion of your first term grade.
  • In addition to the graded summer essays, there will be a reading check quiz and an essay test on all summer reading material during the first unit of the fall semester. These grades increase the importance of your summer work!

I. Thing Fall Apart (Chinua Achebe)

  • “Things Fall Apart tells two intertwining stories, both centering on Okonkwo, a ‘strong man’ of an Ibo village in Nigeria. The first, a powerful fable of the immemorial conflict between the individual and society, traces Okonkwo’s fall from grace with the tribal world. The second, as modern as the first is ancient, concerns the clash of cultures and the destruction of Okonkwo's world with the arrival of aggressive European missionaries. These perfectly harmonized twin dramas are informed by an awareness capable of encompassing at once the life of nature, human history, and the mysterious compulsions of the soul” (Amazon.com).

Your Assignment:

  • Read the novel. Seriously, read the novel.
  • Take careful notes on the novel. These notes will not be collected; however, you are expected to demonstrate a familiarity with key aspects of the novel (i.e., plot, characters, basic themes) when we return to school in September. Reading notes are a great tool to refresh the memory, especially when you may read the novel early in the summer. Also, comprehensive notes make essay writing easier!
  • When you finish reading, answer this question in a focused, well-written, analytical essay: In many works of literature, past events can affect, positively or negatively, the present activities, attitudes, or values of a character. Choose a character from Things Fall Apart who must contend with some aspect of the past, either personal or societal. Then write an essay in which you show how the character's relationship to the past affects his or her life and contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole.
  • Your typed assignment must be at least three full, double-spaced pages but not longer than four pages.
  • This essay assignment is due by 11:59 p.m. on Sunday, July 31st, 2016 and should be submitted via Google Docs to the AP Literature Summer Reading Google Classroom. (If you are having technical issues with the Google Classroom site, plan on emailing your work to me by the deadline.)

II. The Poisonwood Bible (Barbara Kingsolver)

  • “The year is 1959 and the place is the Belgian Congo. Nathan, a Baptist preacher, has come to spread the Word in a remote village reachable only by airplane. To say that he and his family are woefully unprepared would be an understatement: "We came from Bethlehem, Georgia, bearing Betty Crocker cake mixes into the jungle," says Leah, one of Nathan's daughters. But of course it isn't long before they discover that the tremendous humidity has rendered the mixes unusable, their clothes are unsuitable, and they've arrived in the middle of political upheaval as the Congolese seek to wrest independence from Belgium. In addition to poisonous snakes, dangerous animals, and the hostility of the villagers to Nathan's fiery take-no-prisoners brand of Christianity, there are also rebels in the jungle and the threat of war in the air. Could things get any worse?” (Amazon.com).

Your assignment:

  • Read the novel. Believe me; you’ll enjoy this book if you give it a chance!
  • Take careful notes on the novel. These notes will not be collected; however, you are expected to demonstrate a familiarity with key aspects of the novel (i.e., plot, characters, basic themes, symbols) when we return to school in September. Reading notes are a great tool to refresh the memory!
  • As you read, pay close attention to the indirect characterization of the females in the Price family. (You may want to take notes on each character’s personality, including the key moments in the novel that reveal their personality and their reaction to conflicts.)
  • When you have finished the novel, write an essay response on the following prompt: In many ways, characters in literature are on a quest for self-knowledge. With that idea in mind, select one (1) character from the novel and explain how he or she grows and changes over the course of the novel. Explain the evolution in action, words, and/or thought that reveals dynamic growth on the part of the character. If you feel that a particular character remains static and does not change, carefully explain how her personality at the end of the novel is consistent with her presentation at the beginning. Be sure to include specific references to the text, as well illuminating quotations.
  • Your typed assignment must be at least four full, double-spaced pages but not longer than five pages.
  • The creative essay assignment is due by 11:59 p.m. on Friday, September 2nd, 2016 and should be submitted via Google Docs to the AP Literature Summer Reading Google Classroom. (If you are having technical issues with the Google Classroom site, plan on emailing your work to me by the deadline.)

IV. Due Dates:

  • Please send an email from the address you’ll use this summer to ajefferies@braintreema.gov immediately. I must have your summer email address on file before the close of school on June 17th, 2016. If you will not have access to the internet this summer, please see me before the close of school to set up an alternate plan for turning in your work.
  • Please submit your Things Fall Apart essay to Google Classroom on or before July 31st.
  • Please submit your Poisonwood Bible essay to Google Classroom on or before September 2nd.

V. Writing Expectations:

  • Students in the AP Literature course are responsible for prior learning. While the elements of style are a heavy focus in the AP Literature class, students who enroll in the course are expected to have a basic proficiency in some elements of composition, including grammar, usage, and organizational structure. Essay grades will be influenced, both positively and negatively, by a student’s writing style and mechanics. Please consult the “Writing Tips” sheet before editing and submitting your work. My expectation is that your turn in a polished draft, not a rough one.
  • Understand that writing is a process. In my experience, there are very few students who can write an “A” paper in one sitting. Writing is a process that requires several edits and drafts. A student who begins a summer essay at 10:00 p.m. on the night it is due will not be as successful as one who works through the writing process over the course of a few days.
  • Remember to include all elements of an analytical essay. As this is a literature paper, you should include all elements of an analytical essay, including an introduction paragraph, a “how, what, why” thesis statement, topic sentences, concrete evidence, well-chosen quotations, MLA citations, explanations, transitions, and a conclusion paragraph.
  • No shortcuts, please. Please use normal sized font (e.g., Times New Roman, 12 pt. font) and margins (no larger than 1.25 inches). Please do not mess with spacing requirements.

VI. Academic Integrity:

  • All students are bound by the BHS Student/Parent Handbook concerning issues of plagiarism and cheating. Any student found to be in violation of this policy (i.e., using a past student’s work, copying information from an online source, turning in the same work as another student, etc.) will receive no credit for the assignment and may jeopardize their placement in the AP course.
  • The summer work is an important foundation to the school year. The work you complete over the summer will be used heavily during the first term; this is not a “throw away” assignment or “busy work.” As such, you should treat the assignment with the same care you would as one assigned over the school year. Any student seeking to gain credit through cheating or plagiarism will severely hurt their first term average and risk enrollment in the class.
  • Ignorance is not an excuse. If you are unsure whether or not something constitutes as plagiarism, feel free to contact your teacher. If it’s late in the game, use the old adage: “when in doubt, cite it out.” Ignorance of what constitutes plagiarism is not an acceptable defense.


Printable Version of the AP Literature & Composition Summer Reading Assignment Available Here

Mr. Jefferies

AP Literature: Summer Assignment

Welcome to Advanced Placement Literature & Composition! This class provides a wonderful opportunity for you to refine your skills as a reader and writer while navigating the often choppy, turbulent waters of classic literature. I look forward to getting to know each of you over the course of the school year and helping you achieve your academic goals.

Step #1

I have created a Google Classroom account for the AP Literature summer reading assignment. Please join my classroom with the following code: q5lt431

On this site you will find the summer reading instructions, as well as general writing tips to consider when constructing your essays. You are responsible for visiting the site and submitting your completed work on time. If you have an issue or conflict that prevents you from doing so, it is your responsibility to reach out early and often.

Step #2

As you will throughout the school year, you must upload your summer essay assignments to turnitin.com. To do so, please follow these steps:

  • Go to turnitin.com
  • If necessary, click on “create an account” in the top right hand corner of the page.
  • Underneath the heading “Create a New Account,” click “student.”
    • If you already have an account, you can simply enroll in the class
  • Enter the appropriate information:

1. Class ID = 15467952

2. Enrollment Password = APL2017

  • Write down your password and your response to the secret question EXACTLY as you typed them. I will not have access to this information; you will need to reset your own password should you forget.
  • I recommend using your BHS email as your username.
  • Turnitin.com allows the following file types: Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, WordPerfect, PostScript, PDF, HTML, RTF, OpenOffice (ODT), Hangul (HWP), Google Docs, and plain text.

Step #3

Send an email to the following address: alex.jefferies@braintreeschools.org (Note the period between alex & jefferies!)

Please include your full name in the body of the email. This address will not be shared with other AP students; I will use it for mass communication emails or follow-up questions.

Printable Information About Google Classroom, Turnitin and Email

Tips for Successful AP Summer Essays

As you prepare for AP Literature, the expectation is that you have a general understanding of a successful writing process. Students who willingly work through the process, both over the summer and during the school year, experience a great deal more success than those who don’t. Below are some writing tips to consider as you polish and revise your summer essays. Overall style and grammar will be considered in your final score, so be sure to revise a few times before submitting.

Introductions & Thesis Statements

  • Restating the prompt as the first line of your introduction makes you seem disinterested and mechanical. It’s too formulaic and robs you of your stylistic personality.
  • Internalize the prompt question and begin your introduction with a focus on the text. (If you must begin your introduction with some general remarks about your topic, be sure they are thought-provoking and insightful. Simply explaining that “all people in this world go through some sort of change” to a college-level reader is not the most powerful way to start an essay.)
  • On that note, your introduction paragraph should be more than one sentence. An introduction paragraph comprised of just one sentence (the thesis) does not adequately develop your ideas and move your reader towards you argument. Set up your thesis by introducing a key concept before presenting your “how,” “what,” “why” argument.
  • Your thesis is one of the most specific, thought-provoking sentences in your introduction. As such, you should be direct and outline your argument for the essay. For example, saying that a particular symbol in The Poisonwood Bible “gives meaning to the text” is hollow. It’s your job to explain exactly what that meaning is in the thesis.

Analysis

  • There is a difference between plot summary and analysis. Only select the plot details that directly support your argument; there is no need to include plot details that don’t pertain.
  • Assume your reader is extremely familiar with the text you select. Consider your AP audience (high school literature teachers and college professors), and present your argument without rehashing the chronological plot details.
  • Remember this general rule when writing anything: show, don’t tell. If you spend your time telling your reader your argument, it often rings hollow. If you allow the textual details you select to show the validity of your argument as it pertains to the text, the essay will hold water.
  • Avoid speculation. You can only analyze what is on the page and cannot surmise what might have been; therefore, avoid such statements as “if Nathan had never been injured in the war, he most likely would not have taken his family to the Congo.” While that may be true, we’ll never know for sure. Work with what you can prove.
  • Top tier essays often go beyond what is explicitly said in the text. It is accurate to say that the shame Okonkwo feels regarding his father motivates him in life; however, it’s not particularly insightful. After all, Achebe makes it abundantly clear that Okonkwo’s pride is fueled by his feelings for his father. If you spend your essay arguing what is explicitly said in the pages of the text, you will find yourself stuck in the middle of the scoring rubric.

Concrete Terms > Abstract Terms

  • A writer should always favor specific and concrete diction over abstract and vague terms. Do not say “character” if you mean “Okonkwo.” Do not say “actions” if you mean “murder.”
  • Carefully select your words. You will find that the more specific you are, the more condensed your writing becomes.

Yes, Grammar Rules Matter

  • Watch your homonyms! AP students must correctly differentiate between “there,” “their,” and “they’re.” That also goes for “its” and “it’s,” “your” and “you’re,” and “whose” and “who’s.”
  • Do not use “etc.” in your essay. Ever.
  • "However" has two jobs and neither of them is to start a sentence (Okay, I guess there is one way to start a sentence with “however.”) You can use the word as a conjunctive adverb to connect two independent clauses between a semicolon and a comma; however, these ideas should be related. You can, however, use the word to signify and intensify a link to an idea in a previous statement.
  • Remember this basic rule: “i” before “e” except after “c.” With that in mind, the following words are incorrect: recieve, percieve, and concieve.
  • Capitalize proper nouns. There is no excuse for writing “nathan” in your essay.
  • Possessives of names that end in "s" still get an "apostrophe s" unless they are ancient. For example, Jesus' sandals and Chris's notebook both contain the correct use of an apostrophe.
  • Use paragraphs! Paragraphs are a system of organization used by writers. As you shift your focus from one character or topic to another, begin a new paragraph. It helps the reader follow your argument.

Miscellaneous

  • Themes cannot be summarized in one word. For example, “religion” is not a theme in Things Fall Apart. The conflict that arises when humans wield religion and seek to force it on other cultures is a theme.
  • You absolutely must get the title of the book and the names of major characters correct. Barbara Kingsolver wrote The Poisonwood Bible, not Poisonwood Bible. Okonkwo’s father is Unoka, not Unebe.
  • Watch the tone of your essay! You want to sound knowledgeable, not arrogant. Words such as “obviously,” “surely,” and “clearly” can make a writer sound pompous.
  • Take the necessary time to outline your argument before writing. By having a game plan, you can cut down on the number of additions you have to make to your paragraphs.
  • Texts always exist in the present; therefore, write about them in the present tense. That said, there are some occasions where the past tense feels more natural and is acceptable (e.g., flashbacks, deaths).
  • Be authentic. Don’t say what you think your reader wants to hear even if you don’t believe it to be true. Don’t simply regurgitate word-for-word the things that your teacher says in class. Trust your ideas and your words. Synthesize the ideas we discuss in class to create your own voice.


Printable Tips for Successful AP Summer Essays

AP English Language & Composition

AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION
Summer Reading Assignments 2017
Mrs. Cross Murphy, Room 225, lmurphy@braintreema.gov

Directions: You must complete all parts of this assignment. Each part must be completed by the assigned deadline.

  • The summer reading work will comprise 10% of your first quarter grade.
  • In addition, there will be assignments based on the summer work during the first unit of the fall semester. These grades increase the importance of your summer work.

The AP English Language and Composition course emphasizes nonfiction writing, language awareness, close reading, and analysis of nonfiction prose. That means you’ll need to get used to a “different” kind of English course, one that involves less reading and writing about fiction than you may be used to. While we want you to continue reading important and distinctive fiction, you now need to begin working with quality nonfiction. That shift begins with AP summer reading and writing, commencing with an extensive unit on the art and craft of memoir.

Read the assignments carefully and make note of the deadlines. Start your summer work; order your books. You must purchase all of the books for the summer. Make sure you are clear on all deadlines and expectations for each assignment. Do not lose the assignment!!! I won’t be coming in during the summer to make an extra copy for you.

  • Please understand that those who do not complete the assigned work do not get the privilege of remaining on this course. If you choose not to complete the first assignment, please send me an email on or before the due date telling me that you are dropping this course.
  • Please understand that I am a stickler for deadlines. First impressions are lasting; make yours a good one.

You are expected to have thorough, thoughtful summer assignments. Again, first impressions are lasting, and your grade depends upon it. Please don’t make the mistake others in the past have; mediocre work is unacceptable in an AP class, and of course plagiarism or cheating in any way would be extremely foolish. Although collaboration will be encouraged during the course, working together and/or sharing summer assignments will result in a zero for the assignment(s) in question.

Summer Assignment #1
Due: Monday, August 7 in my inbox lmurphy@braintreema.gov by 5:00pm
(That’s not 5:03, it’s 5:00. NO LATE WORK OR EXCUSES WILL BE ACCEPTED).

Reading:

Read Frank McCourt’s memoir Angela’s Ashes. As you read you should mark up your text with questions, observations, and thoughts. We will be discussing this text during the first few days of school. Please bring it with you.

Writing:

  • Part I: ANALYSIS: For Angela’s Ashes, you will be trying an essay (approx. 3 pages typed, double-spaced) written in AP Language analysis style:

Frank McCourt’s memoir Angela’s Ashes captures the author’s miserable childhood growing up in Ireland in a most unique way. Write an essay in which you analyze the strategies McCourt uses to characterize his life and experiences in Ireland.

You MUST analyze McCourt’s choices in dialogue, verb tense, and syntax. In addition, you may explore some other element- tone, diction, selection of detail. Imagery, etc.- that you would like to analyze. Do not analyze things like symbols: you are no longer in AP Lit.

Step 1: Consider his purpose/intent/message in writing his memoir.

Step 2: Consider how his choices work to reinforce that message. Your essay should of course include specific references to the text and include quotes. Your analysis should show the impact and significance of these stylistic choices.

The essay will be graded using a 9-point essay rubric (with which you will become very familiar over the year and I am assuming you have seen in AP Lit). This rubric is attached; please look through it before you begin your writing, and again periodically.

  • Part II: MODEL: Emulative writing: McCourt’s memoir is considered great because of his rather unique writing style.

Step 1: List the features of McCourt’s writing style that you should emulate.

Step 2: Consider a moment from your childhood that you would like to capture in McCourt style. Thoughtfully consider your intent in writing this piece: What do you want the reader to learn through your piece? Consider how the speaker, message, audience will work together in the rhetorical triangle.

Step 3: Write a 2-page double spaced narrative about a specific event in your life that mimics McCourt’s writing style as closely as possible.

This exercise will allow me to evaluate your ability to analyze other’s writing and incorporate the skills learned into your own writing. This is a crucial element in this course. You must demonstrate an understanding of art and craft in the construction of this piece. Carefully consider your word choice, syntax, and presentation of ideas. Your message should be clear to your audience. Remember the rhetorical triangle you learned with your AP Lit teacher!

Summer Assignment #2
Due: The first day of school

Be prepared to hand in your completed journal on the first day of class. NO LATE WORK OR EXCUSES WILL BE ACCEPTED. If you have questions, email me at lmurphy@braintreema.gov

Reading: Read Jeannette Walls’s memoir The Glass Castle.

As you read, you should mark up your texts with questions, observations, or thoughts. We will be discussing this work during the first few weeks of school.

Writing: For The Glass Castle, you must keep a hand-written reading journal (no typed journals will be accepted). Select four (4) passages from the scope of the memoir (1 every 70 pages or so). For each entry, select a particularly important passage (probably at least 5 sentences in length, if not more) and copy it at the top of the page in your journal, including the page number in parentheses. Then, discuss:

1.Walls’s specific purpose and/or attitude of the passage.

2.Examples of effective use of language (diction [word choice], imagery, syntax [word order], point of view, tone, etc.) in conveying his purpose/attitude.

3.Your personal response. Grapple with ideas, themes, reactions, notions that grow out of your reading etc.

After you have finished Walls’s book and your four entries, I would like you to write a final entry EVALUATING the piece of literature as a memoir. What is your personal reaction to the book as a whole? How does this memoir compare to Angela’s Ashes? How do the authors’ styles vary? Give clear and concrete examples.

This journal will be graded using a modified 9-point essay rubric (with which you will become very familiar over the year). This rubric is attached; please look through it before you begin your writing, and again periodically. PLEASE INCLUDE THE RUBRIC IN THE POCKET OF YOUR JOURNAL FOLDER WHEN YOU SUBMIT YOUR WORK (see below for journal format).

Journal Format PLEASE READ!!:

Your hand-written journal should be kept in a pocket folder with the pages secured in the center prongs. Leave a margin on the inner side of the pages to allow room for the prongs, and a margin on the outer side of the pages, to allow room for comments. Write journals in blue or black ink only. Be certain to copy each passage carefully, indicate the page number in parenthesis, and answer ALL parts of the task. You do not need to skip lines, and you MAY write on both sides of the paper is you so choose. Please write legibly. Include your rubric.

SOME TIPS:

When analyzing in AP Language, one must consider the author’s choices!!! The exam questions (and I) will ask you to identify the author’s intent and purpose and then consider how his or her choices in syntax, diction, or other rhetorical strategies work to create tone and convey the author’s message. It’s all about how the parts work together to create the whole!!!

A short example:

This illustrates how to identify purpose, and consider the role of diction and syntax. The following passage is from Friday Night Lights:

“You drive into Odessa the first time and become immersed in a land so vast, so relentless, that something swells up inside, something that makes you feel powerless and insignificant…turning around again, heading north on Grandview back into the plains, there is a feeling of driving into a fathomless end of the earth. And then it rises out of nowhere, two enormous flanks of concrete with a sunken field in between. Going into that stadium, looking up into those rows that can seat twenty thousand, you wonder what it might be like on Friday night, when the lights are on and the heart and soul of the town pours over that field, across those endless plains” (preface, xii-xiii).

In this passage Bissinger juxtaposes the insignificance and powerlessness of man in the West Texas landscape with the epic power and grandeur of the football stadium. In these lines from the preface, Bissinger begins to establish a key idea of the text-man’s search for meaning, man’s need to feel power over his life and his environment. In Odessa, this fleeting sense of man’s power is heralded in football. The word choice to describe the landscape includes such harsh terms as “relentless”, “fathomless”, “vast”, while the terms used to describe the man in this landscape shows his vulnerability- he is “powerless” and “insignificant”. The use of multiple modifiers in the syntactical structures contributes to the sense of “endless” and “vast” plains. There are no short sentences that drive home the key point, but rather a series of loose, periodic, and cumulative sentences that do not necessarily build to a climax, but rather leave the reader enveloped in the language and ideas as one would feel surrounded by the stadium and the fields.

***Try to emulate this in your responses, but be sure to also consider tone and your own personal response to the passage!!!

Rubric for this assignment can be found in the printable version of this assignment below.

Summer Assignment #3
Due: Monday September 11

NO LATE WORK OR EXCUSES WILL BE ACCEPTED. If you have questions, email me at lmurphy@braintreema.gov.

Reading: Jimmy Santiago Baca’s A Place to Stand.

Read and annotate this book as we will be discussing this text the first few weeks of class and using it as a source for a synthesis essay.

Writing:

PART I: In a Callaloo interview with John Keene, Jimmy Santiago Baca claims, “I approach language as if it will contain who I am as a person” – a statement that reflects the poet’s interest in the transformative and generative power of language.

In a well-organized argumentative essay, take a position on the relationship between language and the individual: Can language contain who you are as a person? Is language capable of transforming us? Is language as powerful as Baca believes it to be? Support your argument with appropriate evidence and examples.

***Your argument should use your own observations, experiences, and other texts read, but you MUST include Baca’s text as textual evidence for your argument. You may of course consider Jeannette Walls and Frank McCourt in your exploration of this topic. This essay should be typed, double-spaced, and 2-3 pages in length.

***This is not solely an analysis of Baca’s book, but rather your analysis/interpretation of Baca’s book as it functions as evidence for your own opinion/argument.

Part II: Baca’s memoir and the experiences he shares shed light not only on the power of language, but also on several societal issues. In a typed detailed brainstorm, please identify the key societal issues that Baca presents that led to his imprisonment and issues/concerns with the prison system that we should explore further as a class.

Please identify the issue (be specific, don’t just write prisons – what specifically about prisons and the system??!!) and then clearly explain in a few sentences how Baca presents this issue and what questions/concerns arise from what he shows us in his writing. I want to see that you understand how Baca’s life experience is influenced by societal constructs and what societal issues we need to examine further as a class.

This thinking process will begin the foundation of one of the most important goals of AP Lang: to create an educated citizen who evaluates key societal issues in an effort to better understand the world in which we live and who considers the things we want to change about it.

Rubric for this assignment can be found in the printable version of this assignment below.

Summer Assignment #4: Stay Informed!!
Due: First day of school

NO LATE WORK OR EXCUSES WILL BE ACCEPTED. If you have questions, email me at lmurphy@braintreema.gov.

AP Language is all about reading non-fiction, formulating opinions, creating arguments, and evaluating sources. To begin to create a foundation of examples and ideas to support the arguments you will be asked to make, you need to read a quality news source, such as Time, Newsweek, US News and World Report, or The Atlantic, throughout the summer. This can be either online or a physical newspaper. “The Week in Review” section of the Sunday New York Times provides an excellent look at the main events and arguments of the week. (I also LOVE The Huffington Post online!) Any newspapers or magazines written in English will suffice to complete this assignment, but be sure to use a variety of sources.

1. Collect at least THREE op-ed (opinion/editorial) pieces and THREE news/feature articles. You may not have more than once piece by the same author (I also do not want 4 articles out of the same magazine). Be sure to select articles from a VARIETY of newspapers or magazines. Copy or print out the piece. For EACH article, complete a SMELL ANALYSIS form. You will need to make copies of this form in advance. ALL WORK MUST BE HANDWRITTEN FOR THIS COMPONENT.

****This is NOT BUSY WORK. You will be asked to write an editorial piece for the BHS News as a publishing requirement of the first semester. This exercise will provide you with an opportunity to look at the structure and elements of editorials and news articles. IN ADDITION, it is important to note that a thorough understanding of current events gives students a strong advantage in this course, so the more articles you read, the better.

What to do if you are going to be away for the summer and will not have access to a national or international newspaper or magazine written in English:

1.Access articles online

2.Use the public library before you go and when you get back home

3.Ask a friend or family member to buy and save you several issues for you to read when you come home

4.Subscribe to news magazines before you leave and catch up reading when you get home

MAKE YOUR LIFE EASY: COMMIT TO DOING ONE OF THESE PER WEEK OVER THE SUMMER.

SMELL use the following template to complete a SMELL analysis. Answer in complete sentences.

Publishing Information: Works Cited entry

Sender-Receiver Relationship:

What is the sender-receiver relationship? Who are the images and language meant to attract? Describe the speaker of the text.

Message: What is the message?

Summarize the statements made in the text.

Emotional and Ethical strategies:

What does the author want you to feel? Believe?

Logical Strategies: What logic is operating? How does it (or its absence) affect the message? Consider the logic of images as well as words.

Language: What does the language of the text describe? How does it affect the meaning and effectiveness of the writing? Consider the language of the images as well as the words. Note specific words that help contribute to the argument.

Consider the BIAS of the text. What assumptions are being made? To what degree is the argument appropriate given the specific purpose and audience they are writing to?

EVALUATE the argument. Identify any flaws in reasoning or ideas that you question. What could the opposition argue? Explain why or why not this argument was convincing.

OTHER:

Note other methods used to create argument or elements that you thought were particularly well done in this piece.

Copy the most effective sentence from this article/editorial.


Printable Version of AP English Language and Composition Assignment Available Here


2017 Summer Science Materials - Select Course Below

AP Biology

AP BIOLOGY SUMMER ASSIGNMENT 2017

Purpose: This summer you will delve into the world of biology like you never thought you would in those hot summer months! This summer assignment has been designed with four purposes:

    • to get you to think during those summer months to keep your mind sharp, because I will expect a lot out of it come September
    • to have you review major concepts in biology, which we will build upon in AP Biology, through non-classroom methods of learning
    • to have you earn strong grades to help you begin the first quarter with confidence
    • to enable us to hit the ground running in September by familiarizing yourself with big ideas in biology as well as scientific process and thinking

Instructions: Below is a list of items to complete for your summer assignment. All work must be complete and submitted on google classroom. As always, collaboration is encouraged, but the final product must be your own work.

Due Dates:

    1. Join google classroom using the following class code - ofc69a (for block E) or dpv5cg (for block A): done by June 14th
    2. Signed syllabus (return the last page to Dr. Passeggio in room 208): due by June 16th.
    3. Letter of introduction: due by July 1st.
    4. Survival of The Sickest: due by July 31st.
    5. The Serengeti Rules: due by September 4th.
    6. Take a picture of something out in the world that represents something important that you learned about biology this summer: due September 5th.

GOOGLE CLASSROOM: Please join our class on google classroom. The class code is: ofc69a (for block E) or dpv5cg (for block A). You must be signed into your school gmail account to use google classroom. The details for the remainder of the assignments can be found on google classroom.

    • The syllabus can be found under the “about” tab
    • Items 3-6 can be found as assignment in the “stream”
    Survival of the Sickest The Serengeti Rules

AP Chemistry

Sign contract and return to Mr. Wood (room 371) by Friday June 16th!

    1. Reading: You are responsible for the content in chapters 1-4 of Chemistry the Central Science. You will be given a book to sign out for the year and a pdf of the first 4 chapters will be posted to the google classroom page
    2. Problem solving: Answer all assigned book problems in a bound COMPOSITION NOTEBOOK. You will solve all problem sets and homework for the year in this notebook. Failure to turn in a notebook on the first day of class with all the summer work completed will forfeit your seat in AP Chem. (This does not mean you need to master EVERYTHING in all 4 chapters, but you are expected to diligently work independently to understand the concepts. Remember, this is a college level course, so we move fast!)
    3. AP problems: The AP problems attached should also be included in your Composition notebook.
    4. Online Component: You will register for the online AP Chemistry prep course at https://www.flinnprep.com/ – this is designed to get you ready to take the AP Chemistry class, not the AP exam. Once you have set up an account you can join our class using the code tru13. There are 15 units but you only need to complete the first 10. At the end of each unit is a quiz. You must retake the quizzes until you get an 80% or better.

Chapter 1 Objectives:

    • Classify matter and understand chemical vs. physical changes as well as separation techniques.
    • Master unit conversions involving metric units and temperature conversions from K to °C
    • Understand the uncertainty in measurements and appropriately use significant digits.
    • How to solve problems using dimensional analysis. Be able to set up, cancel units, and solve.

Problems in book: 3,5,6,8,13,15,23,24,28,35,37,43,47,50,58,63,67,71,74

Chapter 2 Objectives:

    • Have basic knowledge of the evolution of atomic theory
    • Understand and define Isotopes and atomic mass, and calculate an average atomic mass.
    • Know how to use the Periodic table, how it’s organized and how to predict ionic charges of monoatomic ions using the table
    • Writing chemical and structural formulas.
    • **NAMING** Note: this is crucial to being able to write chemical formulas!

Problems in book: 3,7,11,19,22,23,25,27,31,32,37,43,47,50,51,55,57,59,61,63,65,67,69,73,82,90

Chapter 3 Objectives

    • Be able to write and balance a chemical equation and understand WHY we balance.
    • Understand patterns of chemical reactivity
    • Use dimensional analysis to convert moles, mass, atoms/molecules, volume.
    • Perform empirical formula calculations and use empirical formulas to identify molecular formulas
    • Use dimensional analysis to solve basic stoichiometry (stoy-key-om-etry) problems as well as limiting and excess reactant problems.

Problems in book: 1,5,10,11,13,17,19,21,23,25,33,35,38,45,47,49,51,57,60,64,65,68,71,77,81, 91,93,97

Chapter 4 Objectives

    • Identify an electrolyte compare to a non-electrolytes
    • Predict products, write and balance a chemical equation for various types of reactions.
    • Memorize strong acids and bases
    • Use Molarity as a conversion factor and be able to perform concentration calculations.
    • Understand dilution problems using M1V1=M2V2
    • Understand methods of chemical analysis (titrations etc.)

Problems in book: 3,5,7,10,12,13,17,19,21,23,33,35,37,39,43,45,49,51,53,56,61,63,67,72,73, 77,81,85,87,94,106,109,113

Memorize all polyatomic ions (page 60 and 62), and strong acids/bases (page 125). There will be a quiz on the first day of school!

AP Problems:

1982 B

Water is added to 4.267 grams of UF6. The only products are 3.730 grams of a solid containing only uranium, oxygen and fluorine and 0.970 gram of a gas. The gas is 95.0% fluorine, and the remainder is hydrogen.

(a) From these data, determine the empirical formula of the gas.

(b) What fraction of the fluorine of the original compound is in the solid and what fraction in the gas after the reaction?

(c) What is the formula of the solid product?

(d) Write a balanced equation for the reaction between UF6 and H2O. Assume that the empirical formula of the gas is the true formula.

2001 B

Answer the following questions about acetylsalicylic acid, the active ingredient in aspirin.

(a) The amount of acetylsalicylic acid in a single aspirin tablet is 325 mg, yet the tablet has a mass of 2.00 g. Calculate the mass percent of acetylsalicylic acid in the tablet.

(b) The elements contained in acetylsalicylic acid are hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen. The combustion of 3.000 g of the pure compound yields 1.200 g of water and 3.72 L of dry carbon dioxide, measured at 750. mm Hg and 25°C. Calculate the mass, in g, of each element in the 3.000 g sample.

(c) A student dissolved 1.625 g of pure acetylsalicylic acid in distilled water and titrated the resulting solution to the equivalence point using 88.43 mL of 0.102 M NaOH(aq). Assuming that acetylsalicylic acid has only one ionizable hydrogen, calculate the molar mass of the acid.

**Sophomores (or those who are rusty with their chemistry) – I highly recommend that you watch Kahn academy videos on youtube for extra help, especially for the subjects that you struggle with in the Flinn Prep course. In addition, the first year Glencoe text is a great resource if you need some backup to the AP text. The AP text is a college textbook after all! You want to be familiar with the entire Glencoe book up to gas laws (Chapter 10).

You can borrow a Glencoe book for the summer or you can access the Glencoe text online at http://www.glencoe.com/ose/. The passcode is F3BC7F5FC1. It has a tendency not to work in the chrome browser but should work fine in either firefox or internet explorer.

AP Chemistry Expectations and Requirements Contract

Printable Version of AP Chemistry Assignment Available Here

AP Environmental Science

AP Physics 2

Summer assignment for AP Physics 2 (2017-2018)

Teacher: Svetlin Tassev

The summer assignment for AP Physics 2 is on: https://runningonphysics.org/edu
Note the S in httpS, and /edu at the end. Without them, the website will fail to load.

The website requires that students provide a valid name and email address when they sign up. Note that if you are trying to sign up for the course with your BHS email, the confirmation email from this website may be blocked by BHS. So, you may need to use an alternative email address. The enrollment key for the course is: ap2%2017

The assignment will open on July 15 and is due August 31. Any account created before July 15 will most probably be destroyed, so wait until that date before signing up.

The problems on the summer assignment are taken from homework given to Honors Physics. The homework features only “plug-and-chug” (as opposed to conceptual) problems, which are meant mostly to make you practice/review basic algebra and physics before the start of the school year.

The homework can be re-attempted without penalties as many times as you wish before the deadline. However, new attempts on a problem may contain modified numerical values for the quantities involved.

If you cannot properly set up a problem on your own after trying for 10 minutes after reviewing the relevant material, feel free to collaborate on that particular problem or to contact me for help.

You should hand in written versions of your solutions to the problems on the first day of school. You will receive no credit without the written version. Your written work should show all steps you took in solving the problems. You should show your algebra with symbols only. Plug in numbers in the end.

This homework will count as one quiz grade during term 1.

Don't hesitate to contact me if you have any questions. My email is stassev@braintreema.gov

Printable Version of AP Physics 2 Assignment Available Here

2017 Summer Social Studies Materials - Select Course Below

Grade 9, Level 1

AP US History

AP US History: Summer 2017: Assignment

PART I: American Pageant (textbook) reading and questions

  1. Read the following chapters in the American Pageant, 14th Edition:
    • Chapter 1 – New World Beginnings
    • Chapter 2 – The Planting of English America
    • Chapter 4 – American Life in the 17th Century
    • Chapter 5 – Colonial Society on the Eve of the Revolution
    • Chapter 6 – The Duel for North America
    • Chapter 7 – The Road to Revolution
  2. As you finish reading each chapter provide answers to the Critical Thinking Questions that accompany each chapter. The Critical Thinking Questions are listed on the pages that follow. Please read the specific instructions with the questions for information about how to format your answers. When answering, thoughtfully explain your response using SPECIFIC FACTUAL INFORMATION from the chapter to support your answer. A good answer makes an argument by synthesizing relevant information from the chapter. I am looking for your ability to formulate a position (make an argument) when answering and support it with valid evidence that shows the sophistication of your knowledge.

      Chapter 3 – Settling the Northern Colonies

              PART II: Essay reading (packet) and Short Answer Questions

              1. Read the following essays in the packet:
                • Myths That Hide the American Indian – Oliver La Farge
                • The Middle Passage – Daniel P. Mannix and Malcolm Cowley
                • George III, Our Last King – J.H. Plumb
                • The Ordeal of Thomas Hutchinson – Bernard Bailyn
              2. As you finish reading each essay, complete the Short Answer Questions.

              PART III: Assessments (It is recommended that you DO THESE LAST)

              You have to complete TWO online assessments of your US history ability. Both assessments can be found on the moodle page.

              1. Chapters 1-7 Multiple Choice Test
                • This assessment will measure how thoroughly you completed the seven assigned chapters of reading and critical thinking questions from these chapters
                • You have received a hard copy of all of the questions, use these to work out the answers prior to opening the test on moodle.
                • You will be given 1 hour and 15 minutes to complete 100 multiple choice questions.
                • Your grade for this assessment will be factored into your term 1 grade as a QUIZ GRADE. Quiz grades represent 20% of the total term grade and we will have 4 or 5 term one. Thus, this one assessment will be worth 4% or 5% of your overall term grade.
              2. Diagnostic AP Exam
                • This assessment is designed to give me an idea of what US History knowledge you already have.
                • You will be given 55 minutes to complete 80 questions.
                • This is an example of an actual multiple choice portion of the AP EXAM.
                • Questions are based on the entirety of US history.
                • Your grade for this assessment WILL be factored in as a HOMEWORK GRADE. Homework grades represent 15% of the total term grade and we will have approximately 30 homework assignments. Thus, this one assessment will be less than 1% of your overall term grade. However, it is in your best interest to take this seriously and try your very best.


              American Pageant Critical Thinking Questions

              INSTRUCTIONS: You may type the answers to these questions or write them out on white-lined paper. There is no length requirement when answering. However, the best answers use SPECIFIC, FACTUAL INFORMATION/EVIDENCE from the textbook when supporting EVERY PART of the question asked. Some questions will require more evidence than others.

              Chapter 1: New World Beginnings

                • How did Indian societies of South and North America differ from European societies at the time the two came into contact with each other?
                • Summarize the motives, expectations, problems, and rewards associated with the age of European expansion.
                • What happened when the “two worlds collided”? Describe the impact of Europeans on Native American (Indian) cultures and the impact of native cultures on Europeans.

              Chapter 2: The Planting of English America

                • What lessons do you think English colonists learned from their early Jamestown experience? Focus on matters of fulfilling expectations, financial support, leadership skills, and relations with the Indians.
                • Did England and the English settlers want the same things from colonization? National glory? Wealth? Adventure? A solution to Old World (European) social/religious tensions? New sources of goods and trade?
                • Compare and contrast the colonial experiences of the English and Spanish colonists
                • How did systems of unfree labor emerge in the New World?
                • How did the reliance on plantation agriculture affect the southern colonies? In other words what were the defining characteristics of the southern, plantation English colonies?

              Chapter 3: Settling the Northern Colonies

                • Why did the Puritans come to America? Compare and contrast the colonial motives of the separatists and non-separatists puritans.
                • How did the Puritan religion affect the daily lives of the New England colonists?
                • Explain the relationship between church beliefs and government in New England? How does the view of the New England Puritans on the relationship between government and religion compare with more recent understandings?
                • How does the founding of the New England colonies compare with the origins of the middle colonies (New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania)? In what ways were New England and the middle colonies each like the South, and in what ways were they different?

              Chapter 4: American Life in the 17th Century

                • What was Bacon’s Rebellion, what circumstances led to it and what did it reveal about the relationship between the English colonists and mother England?
                • How and why was family life in New England so different from family life in the South?
                • Trace the evolution of indentured servitude to black slave labor. Why did slavery grow to be such an important institution in colonial America? In your opinion, was the development of African slavery in North American colonies inevitable (inescapable)?

              Chapter 5: Colonial Society on the Eve of Revolution

                • Summarize the key features of the American population in the early eighteenth century. Consider its sources, size, location, diversity, and mobility.
                • What characteristics united colonists and made their collective identity different from Europeans?
                • What were the causes and effects of the Great Awakening? How did such an intense religious revival help create sense of shared American identity?
                • How democratic was colonial America?

              Chapter 6: The Duel for North America

                • What were the causes of the French and Indian War?
                • Historians have often pointed to the significance of the French and Indian War and how 1763 is a transition moment for American colonial history. Should the French and Indian War be considered one of the causes of the American Revolution? Why or why not?

              Chapter 7: The Road to Revolution

                • How did the British attempt to exert new control over the colonies after the French and Indian War? Why?
                • In what ways were the mercantilist policies of the British burdensome to the colonists? In what ways were they beneficial?
                • Both the British and the colonists were devoted to the principle of “No taxation without representation.” This being true, how did both taxation and representation become major sources of controversy between the colonists and Parliament?
                • Were all of the American grievances against England really justified, or were the British actually being more reasonable than most Americans have traditionally believed?
                • What was the Revolutionary movement really all about? The amount of taxation? The right of Parliament to tax? The inherent political corruption of Britain and the righteous virtue of America? The right of the king to govern America? The colonies growing sense of national identity apart from Britain? Was the Revolution truly a radical overthrow of government and society—the usual definition of “revolution”?
                • Was the American Revolution inevitable? Could America have gradually and peacefully developed independence rather than engaging in a violent revolt?
                • In 1775 which side would a neutral observer have expected to win—Britain or the colonies? Why?
                • How fun was that?

              Printable Version of AP US History Assignment Available Here

              Printable Version of History Summer Reading Essay Packet Available Here

              Scholarly Essay Short Answer Questions

              INSTRUCTIONS AND EXPECTATIONS:

              Each of the following four questions corresponds with one of the four scholarly essays provided to you. Answer only on the answer sheets provided. Any answers written outside of the space given will not be read. You may use pen or pencil, but no typing these answers. Part of the challenge is answering accurately and concisely.

              The Points:

                • You can earn up to 3 points on each of the 4 short answer questions.
                • That means you can earn up to 12 points on this assignment

              Grade Conversion Chart:

                • 12 = 98%
                • 11 = 93%
                • 10 = 88%
                • 9 = 83%
                • 8 = 78%
                • 7 = 73%
                • 6 = 68%
                • 5 = 63%
                • 4 = 58%
                • 3 = 53%
                • 2 = 48%
                • 1 = 43%

              How you earn the points:

              Basically each question will ask you to do THREE THINGS. Doing each of these in the most specific and accurate way will earn you the points. In APUSH short answers often ask for ONE example or piece of evidence. Try to give the best, most SPECIFIC, FACTUAL, evidence when answering what you’re asked. In other words, if you just write a more general answer without reference to specific factual knowledge you acquired from the essays than you will not earn points. Be careful to READ CAREFULLY the question. Sometimes one part of the question might ask for two things. Also, creating a thesis statement (we will talk lots more about this) is NOT NECESSARY. You simply have to answer what you’ve been asked.

              Short Answer Question #1: Myths That Hide the American Indian, Oliver La Farge

              Map1Map2

              Use the specific knowledge you aquired from reading, Myths That Hide the American Indian to answer parts a, b, and c.

                • Choose ONE of the “conflicting myths” about American Indians that La Farge mentions, explain it and why that myth exists.
                • Choose ONE of the American Indian groups from one of the regions mentioned in the article and explain how that group’s way of life was influenced by its environment.
                • Briefly explain ONE example of how contact between American Indians and Europeans brought change to Native American societies.

              Short Answer Question #2: The Middle Passage, Daniel P. Mannix and Malcolm Cowley

              Map3Map4

              Use the specific knowledge you aquired from reading, The Middle Passage to answer parts a, b, and c.

                • Explain how the slave trade was a part of the greater trans-Atlantic economic community in the 18th century.
                • Briefly explain ONE example of how slaves resisted their captivity.
                • Briefly explain ONE example of how slave traders tried to “protect” their “investments.”

              Short Answer Question #3: George III, Our Last King, J.H. Plumb

              A Boxing Match

              A Boxing Match, or Another Bloody Nose for John Bull. 1813 (long after independence, but a good example of how the US looked at King George)

              John Bull = the personafication of England

              George III: "Stop...Brother Jonathan, or I shall fall with the loss of blood -- I thought to have been too heavy for you -- But I must acknowledge your superior skill -- Two blows to my one! -- And so well directed too! Mercy, mercy on me, how does this happen!!!"

              James Madison: "Ha-Ah Johnny! you thought yourself a "Boxer" did you! -- I'll let you know we are an "Enterprize"ing Nation. and ready to meet you with equal force any day."

              The artist gloats over naval losses suffered by England early in the War of 1812, in particular the defeat of the warship "Boxer" by the American frigate "Enterprise" in September 1813

              Info provided by Library of Congress

              Use the specific knowledge you aquired from reading, George III, Our Last King to answer parts a, b, and c.

                • Briefly explain ONE example of how/why George III DESERVES his reputation as the “incompetent” who lost the colonies.
                • Briefly explain ONE example of how/why George II DOES NOT DESERVE his reputation as the “incompetent” who lost the colonies.
                • After reading this article, do you think the author J.H. Plumb “succeeds brilliantly in achieving [his] objective” of presenting George the III fairly? Use ONE example to defend your position.

              Short Answer Question #4: The Ordeal of Thomas Hutchinson, Bernard Bailyn

              The Maffachufetts CalendarThomas Hutchinson

              Use the specific knowledge you acquired from reading, The Ordeal of Thomas Hutchinson to answer parts a and b.

                • What were Thomas Hutchinson’s arguments AGAINST the Stamp Act?
                • Describe TWO reasons for Thomas Hutchinson ultimately being viewed as a traitor to the patriotic cause and misunderstood as a supporter of the Stamp Act?

                Printable Version of Short Answer Questions Available Here

                Printable Answer Sheets for Short Answer Questions Available Here

                  AP US History Summer Reading Test:

                  THIS IS COPY FROM THE ONLINE TEST YOU WILL TAKE.
                  USE THIS TO RESEARCH THE ANSWERS AS YOU READ THE CHAPTERS.

                  Chapter 1:

                  • The first European explorers reached the region that would become the Americas…
                    • More than 300 years ago.
                    • About 400 years ago
                    • More than 500 years ago.
                    • At least 600 years ago.
                    • More than 600 years ago.
                  • What proof has led researchers to conclude that the earth once contained a single continent?
                    • There are identical species of fish in freshwater lakes across the globe.
                    • There are similar types of mountain rages around the world.
                    • All the areas that are not separate regions were similarly affected by the glaciers 10 million years ago.
                    • Ethnic groups in one part of the world can trace their ancestry to people in complete different countries.
                    • There are similar forms of vegetation in many nations.
                  • What is the dominant theory about how the first people arrived in what we now call North America?
                    • Native people long existed here.
                    • They traveled in rafts and simple boats
                    • They walked as far as they could, then sailed or swam the rest of the way.
                    • They walked across a land bridge from Eurasia to North America.
                    • The first North Americans were Vikings who stayed.
                  • The Incas (Peru), Mayans (Central America), and Aztecs (Mexico) owe the development of their sophisticated early civilizations to
                    • the blessings of their many gods
                    • agriculture, particularly the cultivation of corn or maize
                    • early mathematics and mathematicians
                    • advanced early architecture
                    • political systems based on nation-states
                  • What was three-sister farming?
                    • Small women-run farms that were common in some Native American cultures
                    • An early farming cooperative in which three different tribal groups planted and harvest crops together
                    • An agricultural method in which corn, beans, and squash were grown together
                    • An effort originating in the Southwest in 2000 C.E. to develop crops that would yield a more nutritious diet
                    • The Iroquois inheritance system, in which property and possessions passed from one generation to the next through the matrilineal (or mother’s) line
                  • Native Americans did NOT make a major imprint on the land they used for all of the following reasons EXCEPT that they
                    • feared that changing it would affect their survival
                    • lacked the means to dramatically manipulate the land
                    • were spread in small groups across the continent
                    • revered nature and endowed it with spiritual properties
                    • did not believe that they should seek to alter the landscape
                  • Which of these reasons did NOT drive the European exploration that led to the “discovery” of the New World?
                    • The desire to expand their empires and power
                    • The quest for a cheaper route to the East
                    • Spreading Christianity
                    • Finding an alternative trade source for spices, sugar, and other expensive eastern goods
                    • Population surges and land shortages
                  • The plantation system was first developed
                    • in the American southern colonies
                    • by Portuguese explorers in West Africa
                    • by various tribal societies in Africa
                    • in the Chesapeake colonies
                    • by Native Americans
                  • All of the following events into the 15th century set the stage for the dramatic and unexpected discovery of the New World EXCEPT
                    • Increasingly successful long-distance voyages by explorers
                    • Spain’s rising prominence, wealth, and power
                    • New printing presses
                    • Wars between rivaling European countries
                    • Greater use of the compass
                  • What was the Columbian exchange?
                    • Columbus’s agreement with King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella
                    • The diseases the Europeans brought to the Americas
                    • A trade network that Columbus established with Native Americans
                    • The development of sugar plantations in the Caribbean for the European market
                    • The transfer of plants, animals, culture, and diseases that occurred after Columbus’s voyage
                  • In the Treaty of Tordesillas, Spain
                    • Declared all New World territories as its own
                    • Banned conquered Muslims from returning to its territories
                    • Divided up the so-called New World with Portugal
                    • Agreed not to enter the slave trade
                    • Granted control of the West African silver mines to Portugal
                  • Some scholars see the origins of modern capitalism in New World discoveries of precious metals for all of the following reasons EXCEPT
                    • They decreased the cost of consumer goods dramatically
                    • They stimulated surplus money supplies
                    • They laid the foundation for the development of the banking system
                    • They stimulated the spread of commerce and manufacturing
                    • They financed much of the international trade with Asia
                  • Spanish conquistadores, traveling to the New World, hoped to gain all of the following EXCEPT
                    • Noble or royal titles
                    • God’s favor
                    • Golf
                    • A fresh start
                    • A chance to organize an army
                  • Which of the following men was NOT an explorer for Spain?
                    • Francisco Pizzaro
                    • Hernan Cortes
                    • Giovanni Caboto
                    • Juan Ponce de Leon
                    • Fransicso Coronado

                  Chapter 2:

                  • Why did England show little interest in colonizing the New World during most of the 1500s?
                    • Its navy was too weak
                    • It saw little promise in the colonies
                    • It didn’t want to compete with its ally Spain
                    • Internal problems were overwhelming its government
                    • It considered the Americas a savage wilderness
                  • The event that signaled the beginning of the end for the Spanish Empire in the New World was
                    • The crumbling of Spain’s inte4rnal economy
                    • The defeat of the Spanish Armada
                    • Repeated and successful looting of Spanish ships by English pirates and seamen
                    • A series of rebellions in its American colonies
                    • A new war with England
                  • The English first attempted colonization in the Americas in
                    • Roanoke, VA
                    • Plymouth
                    • Newfoundland
                    • Jamestown
                    • Nova Scotia
                  • Which of the following did NOT influence the dramatic rise of England’s colonization efforts in the early 1600s?
                    • Population growth in England
                    • English land shortages
                    • Peace between Britain and Spain
                    • Promised rewards for explorers from the crown
                    • Desire for religious freedom
                  • What makes the Virginia Company charter such a significant document in American history?
                    • It guaranteed Jamestown colonists citizenship rights equal to those of Englishmen
                    • It outlined the goals and rules of the new colony
                    • It established colonial boundaries and outlined the region’s power structure
                    • It sought a new and shorter trade route to the Orient
                    • It was a predecessor to the modern corporation
                  • What single cause was responsible for the death of so many Jamestown settlers in the early years?
                    • Hazardous weather conditions
                    • Attacks by Indians
                    • Crop devastation
                    • Homesickness
                    • Starvation
                  • After the arrival of Europeans in North America, which of the following did NOT have a negative impact on Native American cultural life?
                    • Disease
                    • The introduction of horses
                    • Trade
                    • Land
                    • Intermarriage
                  • The primary labor source for the early development of the plantation colonies of Virginia and Maryland was
                    • Families who settled the area
                    • Indentured servants
                    • Slaves brought from Africa
                    • Prisoners
                    • Second and third sons of English lords
                  • The Acts of Toleration (1649) granted Marylanders
                    • The right to self-government
                    • Legal sanction for importing African slaves
                    • The ability to export productions that would directly compete with British goods
                    • Freedom of Christian worship
                    • Protection from hostile Indians
                  • The struggling Virginia economy was ultimately saved by
                    • Peace treaties with local Native American nations
                    • The slave trade
                    • Rice cultivation
                    • An influx of large numbers of new settlers
                    • The development of tobacco
                  • The purpose of slave codes was to
                    • Limit the rights and behavior of Negro slaves
                    • Outline how many slaves could be imported to the colonies
                    • Regulate the slave trade
                    • Prevent masters from excessive discipline or abuse of slaves
                    • Legalize slavery in the colonies
                  • Which of these was NOT a reason for the founding of Georgia?
                    • To protect northern English colonies from encroachment by Spain
                    • To provide a second chance for those imprisoned for debt
                    • To become a stronghold for the slave trade
                    • To produce silk and wine there
                    • To serve as an outpost for missionaries
                  • The Iroquois became powerful in the 1500s and 1600s by
                    • Building strong relationships with colonists
                    • Merging with other branches of tribes
                    • Relying on a strong patrilineal social structure
                    • Fostering tribal independence
                    • Developing a strong trade network with European settlers
                  • Which of the flowing traits were NOT shared by all of England’ plantation colonies (Maryland, Virginia, the Carolinas, and Georga)?
                    • The development and export a staple crops
                    • Slavery
                    • An aristocratic social hierarchy
                    • Religious tolerance
                    • The birth of large urban port cities

              Chapter 3:

                  • All of the following were tenets of Calvinism EXCEPT
                    • God is all-knowing and all-powerful
                    • By doing good deeds in this life, people could earn a place in God’s kingdom in the afterlife
                    • It was predetermined which souls would go to heaven
                    • Only during conversion might one receive a sign that he or she had been saved
                    • Human beings were weak and prone to sin
                  • Separatists were Puritans who broke away because they
                    • Disliked the fact that all English subjects, regardless of piety, were automatically church members
                    • Were unhappy with the total abandonment of formerly Catholic rituals in the Protestant Reformation
                    • Felt that some members had compromised their faith through alliances with King James I
                    • Thought the Church of England had become corrupt
                    • Saw new opportunities to begin a church of their own in the so-called New World
                  • Why did the Separatists who fled London for Holland eventually settle in the New World?
                    • They were impressed by tales of great riches already discovered in English settlements
                    • England enticed them to the colonies with promises of religious freedom and assistance
                    • They were worried about the “Dutchification” of their children and wanted to practice their religious as English citizens
                    • They were enticed by friends and relatives who had already relocated to the colonies
                    • They envisioned great financial opportunities for their husbands and sons through an alliance with the Virginia Company
                  • The Mayflower Compact is significant because it
                    • Was the first constitution in the English colonies
                    • Guaranteed religious freedom to all settlers
                    • Was a first step toward colonial self-government
                    • Included the signatures of men and women who arrived on the Mayflower
                    • Granted each settler 50 acres of land
                  • The colony founded by the Pilgrims in Plymouth Bay was
                    • Immediately successful
                    • At war with native populations from the start
                    • So ravaged by its first winter that many settlers abandoned the colony and returned home
                    • Prosperous within a year, as a result of a bountiful harvest
                    • Led by a series of corrupt, poorly educated men
                  • What did Massachusetts governor John Winthrop mean when he said, “We shall be as a city upon a hill”?
                    • He envisioned the Massachusetts Bay Company as becoming the most economically successful British colony
                    • He hoped that the colony would become a holy society that would serve as a model for people everywhere
                    • He was referring to Boston as the city where elite, wealthy, and well-educated people would settle and set an example for other colonists
                    • He was describing Boston as the seat of English colonial government
                    • He wanted the colony to provide public eduation for all citizens and believed that an educated populace was the key to success in all the colonies
                  • What was the single most important qualification for voting, above all others, in the provincial governments of the Massachusetts Bay Colony?
                    • Land ownership
                    • Male status
                    • English citizenship
                    • Taxpaying status
                    • Church membership
                  • Today, both Anne Hutchinson and Roger Williams are considered heroes for all of these reasons EXCEPT that they
                    • Challenged Puritan orthodoxy
                    • Were exiled for their beliefs
                    • Inspired dissent within the Puritan Church
                    • Founded successful colonies elsewhere
                    • Questioned colonial customs and practices
                  • How did Indians resist English encroachment on their land?
                    • By foreign intertribal alliance
                    • By agreeing to convert to the Puritan faith
                    • By seeking peaceful, cooperative use of the land
                    • By arranging marriages between Indians and settlers
                    • By seeking assistance from sympathetic colonists
                  • Established in 1686, the Dominion of New England was
                    • The name given to the colonial militia
                    • England’s attempt to consolidate and better control its northeastern colonies
                    • The first colonial confederation stressing independent self-rule
                    • A religious organization established by the colonists to replace the Chr4uch of England
                    • A charter company that was granted settlement rights to the areas that would become Maine and New Hampshire
                  • The Dutch colony of New Netherlands finally became the English colony New York as a result of
                    • Increased English immigration and settlement in the region
                    • The mismanagement and bankruptcy of the Dutch West India Company
                    • The inability of the Dutch to defend the colony against Indian attacks and encroachment by other European settlers
                    • The sale of the colony to England by the Dutch West India Company
                    • A battle by the English Dutch forces in New Amsterdam
                  • Which of the following statements about the Pennsylvania colony is NOT true?
                    • It was founded by William Penn as a haven for Quakers
                    • Organizers advertised widely to draw prospective settlers from several European countries
                    • Relations between early colonists and Indians were initially tense
                    • Its founder wanted to experiment with liberal forms of government
                    • Generous land policies attracted large numbers of immigrants
                  • The middle colonies—New York, New Jersey, Delaware, and Pennsylvania—all had which of the following traits in common?
                    • Rich, fertile soil that enabled the region to produce an export vast quantities of grain
                    • A population that was less ethnically and religiously mixed than other regions
                    • Soil that was typically rocky and often difficult to farm
                    • Landholdings that were generally small in size
                    • Few industries or port cities for trade with England and other colonies
                  • What were blue laws?
                    • Legal codes that regulated who could vote
                    • Laws that determined which religions would be permitted to settle in a given region
                    • The rules that guided how large a tract of land a person would receive
                    • Code that regulated acceptable social behavior
                    • Tariffs placed on certain imported goods

              Chapter 4:

                  • Early colonists in the Chesapeake struggled with all of the following EXCEPT
                    • A shorter life expectancy than colonists in other regions
                    • Strange and debilitating new diseases
                    • Land that was difficult to farm
                    • Significantly more men than women
                    • Lack of a stable family structure
                  • What were freedom dues?
                    • Farm implements, clothes, and sometimes land given to former indentured servants
                    • Fees paid by former criminals to stared a new life in the English colonies
                    • The cost of passage for anyone moving from England to the colonies
                    • They system that gave 50 acres of land to anyone paying the passage of workers to the Chesapeake
                    • An agreement to work for seven years in exchange for passage to the colonies
                  • Bacon’s Rebellion was triggered by
                    • New and heavy taxes in the backcountry
                    • Land shortages and Indian policies
                    • A severe depression in the 17th century
                    • Government mismanagement
                    • A slave uprising led by Nathanial Bacon
                  • What was the middle passage?
                    • The middle part of a ship, in which slaves were transported from Africa to the Americas
                    • Slave ships that were bound for the middle colonies
                    • The cost of transporting slaves from Africa to the New World
                    • The transatlantic journey that brought slaves to the Americas
                    • The organized breeding of slaves in the lower South for sale in the upper South
                  • Slave codes had all of the following qualities EXCEPT
                    • The codes differentiated slaves from servants along racial lines
                    • They made all slaves the property of their white owners for life
                    • They made it illegal to teach a slave to read or write
                    • There were no provisions allowing for slaves to be freed
                    • They were first implemented in the Carolinas
                  • What is Gullah?
                    • A slave language
                    • A method of rice cultivation widely used in the Carolinas
                    • A West African religious dance
                    • A type of African bongo drum
                    • A rice-based dish
                  • The Stono Rebellion was
                    • As large and devastating as Bacon’s Rebellion
                    • An example of slaves’ anger at their treatment and permanent servitude
                    • A slave revolt that erupted in New York in 1712
                    • A labor strike by African American bricklayers, carpenters, and tanners
                    • Successful at reversing many of the restrictive slave codes
                  • All of the following are true about early slaves EXCEPT
                    • early slaves were primarily men
                    • slaves initially worked on small, isolated farms
                    • some early slaves were able to buy their freedom
                    • slave imports continued to outnumber American-born slaves well into the late 1700s
                    • slaves on plantations had greater social contact with each other
                  • How did slaves adapt the Christian religion to make it their own?
                    • They rejected the notion of heaven
                    • they conducted services in their native languages
                    • They infused their worship with singing and dancing
                    • They merged African gods with the Christian God
                    • They accepted Christian scriptural interpretations for their servitude
                  • The largest segment of white Virginians were
                    • Plantation owners
                    • Merchants
                    • Indentured servants
                    • Landless whites
                    • Small farmers
                  • The early Puritans in New England lived
                    • A few years longer than their counterparts in England
                    • Almost as long as Americans today
                    • Barely past the age of 50
                    • Mot more than two years in the harsh New England climate
                    • The same number of years as their counterparts in the Chesapeake
                  • Why did New England leaders block women from retaining separate property and inheriting their husband’s estates the way southern women did?
                    • They feared that it would undermine family unity
                    • They worried that women would hoard land needed for the region’s economic development
                    • New Englanders were concerned that it would keep women from marrying
                    • They believed that the courts should handle these matters
                    • They felt that widows were well protected under their laws.
                  • All of the following statements about the witchcraft hysteria and trials in Salem in the 1690s are true EXCEPT
                    • They started when a group of teenage grils claimed that older women in town had cast spells on them
                    • Property-owning women were often the targets
                    • Those accused of witchcraft were never exonerated
                    • The witchcraft hysteria was driven by growing social and religious tension
                    • Twenty people and two dogs were executed as witches
                  • How did New England settlers’ ideas about land differ from those of the Indians they encountered?
                    • The Indians used the land for farming, while the English wanted it for livestock
                    • The English believe in staying in one place until the soil was depleted, then moving on
                    • The Indians did not believe that land could be privately owned
                    • New England colonists built their economy around staple crops
                    • The English relied on slave labor to help develop New England colonies

              Chapter 5:

                  • What were the political ramifications of the surging population growth in the American colonies from 1700 to 1775?
                    • The number of colonies more than doubled from six to thirteen
                    • The ratio of American colonist to English subjects dramatically declined
                    • There were massive food shortages in the colonies
                    • The immigrant population surpassed those born in the colonies
                    • More people moved from the countryside to the growing cities
                  • All of the following statements are true about Scots-Irish immigrants to Pennsylvania EXCEPT
                    • They were the first to settle the American West
                    • They were not actually of Irish descent
                    • Many of them united with the American revolutionaries
                    • They brought with them the know-how for whiskey distilling
                    • They were tolerant of local Indians
                  • The ethnic diversity of the 18th century America colonies is significant because it
                    • Paved the way for a new, multicultural American identity
                    • Fueled heightened tensions within the colonies
                    • Made unity against the British difficult to achieve
                    • Resulted in 18 non-English signatories to the Declaration of Independence
                    • Caused the eventual rift between the northern and southern colonies
                  • Which of these did NOT contribute to the increasing social stratification and declining opportunities for social mobility in pre-Revolutionary America?
                    • The growth of slavery in the Chesapeake
                    • The emergence of a wealthy merchant class
                    • Declining supplies of unclaimed land in New England
                    • The rising number of convicts sent to the colonies
                    • The impact of the wars of the 1690s and 1700s
                  • Despite the constant threat of smallpox, American colonists resisted inoculation mainly because
                    • Vaccines were rare and untested
                    • Doctors were poorly trained
                    • Ministers regarded inoculation as tampering with God’s will
                    • Home remedies worked well in fighting and treating the virus
                    • Several prominent citizens had survived the disease
                  • Which of the following was the surest path to quick wealth in 18th-century America?
                    • Commerce and land speculation
                    • Tobacco farming
                    • Wheat cultivation
                    • Fishing
                    • Buying and selling slaves
                  • The term triangular trade describes
                    • The three main staple crops that each colonial region relied on for trade: grain in the North, tobacco in the Chesapeake, and rice in the South
                    • The exportation of colonial goods to other European countries through British middlemen
                    • Rum sent from New England to trade for slaves in Africa, who were then exchange for molasses in the West Indies that could be sold back to New England
                    • The trade network that included Indian fur traders, West Indian sugar growers, and British merchants
                    • The notion of the East and West Indians as part of the broader American system of commerce
                  • The single most important manufacturing activity in the colonies in the 1770s was
                    • Blacksmithing
                    • Lumbering
                    • Rum and whiskey
                    • Carpentry
                    • Iron
                  • What did Parliament hope to accomplish with the Molasses Act (1733)?
                    • Cut off American trade with the French West Indies
                    • Generate new revenue from the colonies
                    • Install tariffs on goods that were not sent through England first
                    • Stifle growing colonial commercial independence
                    • Dramatically reduce whiskey and rum production
                  • In the early 18th century, the Puritan religion declined for all of the following reasons EXCEPT
                    • Decreased interest in its complicated doctrines and long sermons
                    • Disapproval of its efforts to loosen church membership requirements
                    • Liberal challenges to older ideas about salvation
                    • Increased tithing (taxing) of church members
                    • Heightened support for Arminian assumptions about free will
                  • Which of these did NOT result from the Great Awakening?
                    • The authority of older clergy was called into question
                    • Many new churches were established
                    • A new wave of Christian missionaries attempted to convert Indians and slaves
                    • Several colleges and universities were founded
                    • There was a heightened sense of sectional and regional differences
                  • Early college education in New England was designed to
                    • Prepare young men to become ministers
                    • Educate future leaders
                    • create an enlightened citizenry
                    • Teach boys to read and write
                    • Encourage more men to enter the professions (law, medicine, etc.)
                  • Which of these in NOT numbered among Benjamin Franklin’s many contributions to America?
                    • Poor Richard’s Almanack
                    • Inventions
                    • Scientific experiments
                    • Writing the Declaration of Independence
                    • The first public library
                  • The Zenger case is significant for
                    • Making sedition illegal
                    • Establishing freedom of the press
                    • Guaranteeing backcountry residents equal representation in colonial governments
                    • Ensuring taxation through proper representation
                    • Linking voting rights and office holding to property ownership

              Chapter 6

                  • What kept France from exploring the New World until the late 16th century
                    • Lack of interest by the crown
                    • Ill-fated missions by early English settlers
                    • Foreign wars and internal conflicts
                    • The cost of financing an expedition
                    • Fear of repercussions from Spain and England
                  • What decision did French explorer Samuel de Champlain make that had long-term negative consequences for France’s conquest of the New World
                    • He established Quebec as the capital of New France
                    • He befriended the Huron Indians
                    • He befriended the Iroquois
                    • He drove out English settlers in the region
                    • He antagonized Spanish and English explorers
                  • How did the government of the French colonies differ from that of the English colonies?
                    • The French colonies were run entirely by the crown
                    • The French colonies established governments that were completely independent of the crown
                    • Commercial companies had control over the French colonies
                    • Colonists were granted a wide rage of rights, including trial by jury
                    • Settlers established a representative form of government elected by the people
                  • Settlement of the French colonies in New Canada grew very slowly until 1750 for all of the following reasons EXCEPT
                    • there was plenty of available land for those who wanted it in their French homeland
                    • Protestant Huguenots were prohibited from immigrating to the French colonies
                    • The government focused on developed its Caribbean colonies
                    • Canada’s cold, snowy climate presented a difficult challenge
                    • Consumer demand for New France’s main export, beaver skins, had dropped off considerably
                  • Which of the following was NOT a principle motivation for French exploration of territory beyond New France in the 18th century
                    • Converting Indians to Christianity
                    • Keeping British settlers from moving into the nearby Ohio Valley
                    • Seeking new beaver supplies
                    • Thwarting Spain’s attempts to claim land north of Mexico
                    • Difficulties with local native populations
                  • After 2 wars for control of North America, England and France signed a peace treaty in 1713 that granted
                    • Acadia, Newfoundland, and Hudson Bay to the British
                    • Acadia, Newfoundland, and Hudson Bay to the French
                    • Maine and the Ohio Valley to France
                    • Louisiana to the British
                    • Limited trading rights in Spanish Florida to the French
                  • All of the following Anglo-French colonial wars began in Europe EXCEPT
                    • King William’s War
                    • The French and Indian War
                    • The War of Austrian Succession
                    • Queen Anne’s War
                    • The War of Jenkins’ Ear
                  • How did George Washington start the global war in 1754 that would later come to be known as the Seven Year’s War?
                    • Washington forcibly relocated thousands of French Acadians from the area known as Nova Scotia to other French territories
                    • Washington claimed, for his family, the same Ohio territory where the French had built Fort Duquesne
                    • Washington’s men killed a French military leader on the outskirts of Fort Duquesne
                    • Washington recklessly attacked French forces without a battle plan
                    • Washington sent an insulting letter to French leaders in the Ohio territory
                  • Prompted by the British to promote greater intercolonial unity and defense during the French and Indian War, the Albany Congress failed in its attempts to establish colonial home rule because
                    • Not all colonies sent representatives to Albany
                    • The colonists felt it did not offer enough independence
                    • The British authorities deemed such efforts illegal
                    • The colonists were unwilling to fund the venture
                    • The colonists wanted to preserve their individuality and did not see the need for union
                  • How did British leader William Pitt earn the nickname “Organizer for Victory”?
                    • He shifted the failing British military strategy toward Quebec and Montreal
                    • He relied on the experience of older generals to lead
                    • He forced France to hand over its southernmost territories to Spain
                    • He trained colonists for military service
                    • He convinced colonists to donate funds for the war
                  • The intercolonial disunity that prevailed during the French and Indian War was caused by all of the following conditions EXCEPT
                    • The prevalence of conflicting religions
                    • An enormous sense of geographic distance from one colony to the next
                    • Varied nationalities
                    • Differences about the continuation of slavery
                    • Class tensions
                  • Colonists came away from their experience in the French and Indian War feeling
                    • Confident of their military might
                    • The desire for Britain to better safeguard its colonies
                    • Increasingly concerned about Indian attacks
                    • A greater sense of oneness with their British compatriots
                    • Eager to break off ties with Britain
                  • What key strategic tool did the Indians lose as a result of the war’s outcome and the Treaty of Paris?
                    • Alliances with Quakers and Christian missionaries
                    • French and Spanish protection against the British
                    • Strategic trading posts
                    • Control of vital frontier territory
                    • The ability to play rival European countries against each other
                  • The Proclamation of 1763
                    • exacted burdensome taxes from the colonist to finance Britain’s war debts
                    • granted some frontier territory to Native Americans
                    • prohibited colonists from settling beyond the Appalachians
                    • established royal governors in the colonies
                    • made Florida a British territory

              Chapter 7:

                  • The Republican and Whig ideologies that English colonists embraced by the mid-18th century included all of the following tenets EXCEPT
                    • Power should be centralized within the monarchy
                    • Power should put the public good ahead of their self-interests
                    • a functioning society is based on the virtue of its citizenry
                    • self-sufficiency, courage, and civic involvement are crucial for republican societies
                    • hierarchical governments breed corruption
                  • Which of the following circumstances did NOT influence American’s attitudes about rights and the nature of government by the 1750s
                    • The aristocracy that was common in Britain never took hold in the colonies
                    • Property ownership and political participation were more easily accessible in the colonies
                    • Colonist had become accustomed to running things themselves, with little interference from the crown
                    • They universally embraced religious toleration
                    • The vast ocean expanse that distanced Britain from the colonies also weakened Britain’ ability to exert its authority
                  • Britain’s relationship with its colonies was based on mercantilism, the theory that
                    • Wealth is power, and colonies could be used to enrich the mother country
                    • Colonies should develop independent trade so as not to financially burden the mother country
                    • Commerce should be allowed to develop, uninhibited by government interference
                    • Britain had the right to tax and regulate the colonies as it saw fit
                    • The colonies should become economically self-sufficient within 25 years of settlement
                  • The colonists detested the mercantilist system for all of these reasons EXCEPT
                    • if kept them in a state of economic dependency
                    • it caused a currency surplus
                    • Britain nullified any laws passed by colonial government that interfered with the mercantilist system
                    • It restricted how American goods could be transported or sold
                    • It required the colonies to buy certain goods only from Britain
                  • In what ways did mercantilism benefit the colonists?
                    • Britain provided subsidies for surplus crops
                    • Mercantilism helped several colonial merchants become wealthy
                    • It elevated some colonist to positions of political power
                    • It stimulated American wool manufacturing
                    • Britain granted tem certain trade monopolies and protected them militarily
                  • To raise money to cover debts incurred in the Seven Year’s War and to reassert its authority over its North American colonies, Britain passed all of the following
                    • Navigation Acts
                    • Sugar Act
                    • Intolerable Act
                    • Quartering Act
                    • Stamp Act
                  • Americans responded to Britain’s many new taxes in the 1760s with the line, “no taxation without representation”. What did they mean exactly?
                    • That Americans wanted to have representatives in Parliament before they would accept tax legislation passed there
                    • That only colonial legislatures could tax the colonies
                    • That the colonists would accept virtual representation in fiscal matters
                    • That Parliament put the needs of citizens in England above those of its colonists
                    • That the kind was the ultimate representative, and therefore exclusively held the power to tax
                  • Which of these protest against the Stamp Act was most effective in ultimately securing its repeal
                    • The Stamp Act Congress of 1765
                    • Petitions to Parliament
                    • Non-importation agreements
                    • Violent protests
                    • Refusal to pay the tax
                  • British colonists were outraged by the Townshend Act for all of the following reason EXCEPT
                    • It sought to skirt the issue of taxation by imposing “duties” instead
                    • It taxed many of their favorite imported goods
                    • Monies collected under the act would pay the salaries of royal officials
                    • It included a provision to close any colonial port that did not pay the duties
                    • It was yet another example of taxation without representation
                  • The Boston Massacre, which occurred on March 5, 1770 describes
                    • A protest in which colonists burned Governor Thomas Hutchinson’s house to the ground
                    • A standoff between colonist and redcoats that resulted in the deaths of 11 Bostonians
                    • A mob protest in which two dozen British soldiers were killed
                    • The first military battle between the Sons of Liberty and the British
                    • The dumping of 342 chest of imported tea and other goods into Boston harbor
                  • What was the most significant role of the committees of correspondence?
                    • Writing broadsides
                    • Encouraging women’s participation in boycotts and rebellions
                    • Building momentum for a complete break with Britain
                    • Seeking every colony’s participation in the first American Congress
                    • Organizing local letter-writing campaigns to fortify colonial resistance to British policies
                  • Why did tea become the focus of protest against British policies that ended with the Boston Tea Party in 1773
                    • The price of tea had skyrocketed under the British East India company’s trade monopoly
                    • Colonists resented England’s attempt to force only one tea source on them
                    • Tea touched the lives of colonist from every social class
                    • Tea was England’s leading export
                    • Colonists could easily go without tea
                  • The First Continental Congress met in 1774 principally to
                    • strategize ways to redress colonial grievances
                    • Declare the colonies’ independence from Britain
                    • Outline a new national government for the future United States
                    • Organizing a colonial army
                    • Enlist the support of other countries in its conflict with Britain
                  • Both Britain and Spain pressured their colonies with new taxes to help pay their share of the Seven Year’s War; but reaction to these policies led to a war for independence only among British colonists for all of the following reasons EXCEPT
                    • Britain had rich and powerful enemies that colonists could tap for assistance
                    • Spanish colonies were far more ethnically and racially divided
                    • British settlers were accustomed to more liberal local governments than those in Spain and its colonies
                    • Rights were a central component of British vs. Spanish notions of citizenship
                    • British colonists had established local militias from the earliest days of settlement


              Printable Version of AP US History Summer Reading Test Available Here

              AP European History

              SUMMER READING PROJECT FOR AP EURO STUDENTS

              First, please sign up for ‘Remind.’ Text @4b38df to 81010 to join the AP Euro 2017-18 Remind class.
              Second, please join AP EURO 2017-2018 on Google Classroom using the code dnjuf6u.
              Also, please feel free to email me any questions you may have: richard.flanagan@braintreeschools.org

              Students taking Advanced Placement European History must obtain the following book: A World Lit Only By Fire: The Medieval Mind and the Renaissance (1992) by William Manchester. [ISBN 0316545562]

                • This book was a best seller. I hope that you find it an interesting read as well as an informative one.
                • Answer ALL questions.

              PART 1: Essay (25%)

              Using only pages 3-28, write an essay that starts with the following thesis: “The Medieval Mind was ______, ______, and ______.” The intro paragraph needs only the thesis.
              Support each adjective you choose with specific examples from the book.
              Cite page numbers. (essay should be at least 1 page in length)

              PART 2: Essay (25%)

              Using only pages 31-68, write an essay that starts with the following thesis: : “Life during the Medieval period was ______, ______, and ______.” The intro paragraph needs only the thesis.
              Support each adjective you choose with specific examples from the book.
              Cite page numbers. (essay should be at least 1 page in length)

              PART 3: Quotes (50%)

              For Sections Two, “The Shattering,” and Three, “One Man Alone,” explain the following quotations from the book in your own words and then summarize the evidence that Manchester supplies to support his generalizations. That evidence may precede or follow the quotation. The page numbers correspond to the paperback edition.

              For each, type the quote and respond with (at least) half-page explanations.
              Be sure to cite page numbers when you quote or paraphrase the book.

              p. 112 “Humanism...led to the greatest threat the Church had ever faced.”

              p. 143 “He [Luther] had broken the dam of medieval discipline.”

              p. 176 “Thus Protestantism was divided at its birth.”

              p. 206 “In the popular imagination, Henry VIII and Martin Luther have been yoked as leaders of the reformation...in fact they do not belong together.”

              p. 228 “Its clarifying event was the shattering of the medieval world…”

              p. 288 “In the long lists of history it is difficult to find another figure whose heroism matches Magellan’s.” Why does Manchester say so and do you agree?

              All parts of the summer assignment must be typed.

              Each part should start on a new page.

              Typing Requirements:AP European History Cover Page Sample
                • Double Spaced
                • Times New Roman
                • 12 Point Font
                • Black ink
                • 1 inch margins (default is usually 1.25” Change it)
                • Cover page (Simple. See example to the right)
                • Clearly label each part of the assignment.
              Your term grades for the course are calculated as follows:
                • HW = 15%
                • Tests = 28%
                • Writing (DBQs, LEQs, etc.) = 42%
                • Participation = 15%

              This assignment will count as the first grade in the first term’s Writing category and is the equivalent to three LEQs (150 POINTS).

              THE ASSIGNMENT IS DUE THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS.

              ANY LATE PAPERS WILL BE PENALIZED AT A RATE OF 10% PER DAY.

              *IN ADDITION TO ALL OF THE ABOVE, PLEASE COMPLETE THE CHAPTER 13 HOMEWORK PACKET THAT CORRESPONDS TO THE TEXT BOOK.*

              This Chapter 13 packet is considered your first homework assignment and will NOT be accepted late.

              Printable Version of AP European History Assignment Available Here

              AP Human Geography

              AP Human Geography Summer Assignments

              The following are the summer assignments for AP Human Geography. There are two reading assignments you will be responsible for over the summer.

              Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal is a great book! The book revolves around America’s fast food culture and its impact on our lives. Who would have thought that McDonald’s could impact your education? The connection to our lives is greater than you probably realize. You are also going write a paper analyzing the book and its relationship to Human Geography.

              Finally, you will be responsible for reading textbook pages, answering questions, and defining vocabulary. It is recommended that you take notes on the first chapter of the text as you will be responsible for this information on your first quiz and test. If you have questions over the summer you can contact me via email (mhaupert@braintreema.gov or mallory.haupert@braintreeschools.org), which I will be checking periodically.

              Before starting the summer assignment you MUST sign on to Google Classroom.

              Step 1: Go to Google Classroom.

              Step 2: Enroll in the AP Human Geography page using class code: ufu1ms

              Step 3: Materials and textbook reading for the summer assignment will be posted there.

              ALL SUMMER ASSIGNMENTS ARE DUE THE FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL. IF CLASS IS MISSED DUE TO AN ASSEMBLY, PAPERS MUST BE PASSED IN TO ME BY 2:15. NO LATE PAPERS WILL BE ACCEPTED.

              Your summer assignments:

                1. Summer reading assignment: Eric Schlosser’s Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal, HarperCollins, 2002.
                2. Paper on Fast Food Nation. The rubric for the paper is the last page of this packet.
                3. De Blij, H. J., and Alexander B. Murphy. Human Geography: Culture, Society, and Space. 10th ed. New York: John Wiley, 2012. Read pp. 1-34 and define all “Key Terms” at the end of the chapter. Answer the following questions in a typed response. Answers to these questions need to reflect geographic inquiry. They should include appropriate vocabulary and thoughtful analysis of the world around you..
                  • Use Google Earth to find a place where you have never been, but feel as though you know about. After selecting your location, research the area by clicking through the cards in the upper right. Read through the cards to broaden your understanding of the place. Explore the area using “street view” and any other options available to you on the web page. How does studying this place on Google Earth change your mental map and/or your understanding of the place?
                  • Continue using Google Earth to explore an area that is completely unknown to you. Start by selecting the “voyager” tab (it looks like a ship’s wheel) on the left hand side of the page. Choose one of the five categories (editor’s picks, travel, nature, culture, or history) and find a place of interest that you know nothing about. Provide a summary of what you learned by exploring this new place.
                  • Once you think about different types of diffusion, you might be tempted to figure out what kinds of diffusion are taking place in the world around you. Please remember that any good, idea, or disease can diffuse in more than one way. Choose a good, idea, or disease as an example and describe how it diffused from its hearth across the globe, referring to at least three different types of diffusion.
                  • Think about something that is of personal interest to you (music, literature, politics, science, sports, etc.), and consider how whatever you have chosen could be studied from a geographic perspective. Write a geographic question that could be the foundation of a geographic study of the item you have chosen. Think about space and location, landscape, and place. Describe how some of the geographic concepts you learned about in chapter 1 could help analyze and study the item you chose.

                AP Human Geography Summer Assignment Paper

                Your summer assignment is to read Eric Schlosser’s Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal, HarperCollins, 2002. Your papers should be no more than 4 pages, MAXIMUM. The point of this assignment is to see how well you can synthesize the information from the book. GEOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS SHOULD BE THE FOCUS OF YOUR PAPER. USE IMPORTANT AND RELEVANT VOCABULARY LEARNED FROM CHAPTER ONE OF THE TEXTBOOK. You need to make EVERY word count, no fluff. Use the following rubric as an organizational guide:

                Guidelines and Rubric

                • Analysis

                _____/20 points: Author's objectives. What did the author intend for the reader in writing this book?

                Approximately ½ page in length.

                _____/20 points: Universal lessons. Provide examples from the book of lessons that would apply to any place or time. These lessons should deal, if possible, with the distinctive features of human existence and the experiences the majority of us share, for example, “everything in moderation.” If you do not feel there is any lesson to be learned from the book, explain why.

                Approximately 1 ½ pages in length.

                • Themes of Geography

                _____/50 points: Please identify and define the five themes of geography (location, movement, place, human and environment interaction, and region). Then support each theme with specific examples from Fast Food Nation. If you are unsure of the definitions of these concepts, you will find them in your textbook or in a Google search related to the "five themes of geography."

                Approximately 2 pages in length.

                _____/10 points: Use of passages to support answer. Proper citation is required.

                • Overall Paper

                Spelling and grammar are expected to reflex AP caliber work. Points can be deducted for failing to proofread papers and poor writing.

                Total: ______/100 points

                Printable Version of AP Human Geography Assignment Available Here

              2017 Summer Math Materials - Select Grade Below

              Grades K-5 Summer Math

              Greg Tang Summer Challenge

              As stated by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, “It takes a mathematical community to develop an eager, confident math learner.” We thank you for all of your support and effort with your child this year as they continue to build a passion for and love of mathematics. The Braintree Public Schools are participating in Greg Tang’s Summer Break Math Challenge for those students who wish to continue practicing and developing their math skills throughout the summer. While the challenge is completely optional, every student would benefit from working on the activities noted on the challenge board.

              Please use the links below to access the challenge boards as well as the games activities noted on the boards:

              Grades K-5 Additional Resources

              Online Resources

              The following sites are free and allow students to continue practicing their math skills at home. These sites are endorsed by our teachers and will be familiar to most students from work done during class this year:

              Additional Math Activities

              Teacher's Favorite Website: Math K-5

              Fact Fluency Practice & Application

              General Math:

              Printable List of Favorite Web Sites Available Here

              Grades 9-12 Summer Math

              2017 Summer Foreign Language Materials - Select Course Below

              AP Spanish

              Tarea de verano

              Español 5AP

              Vas a completar todas las tareas en Google Classroom.

              Class code: qv8ch3

              I. Primera parte

              Quiero que mires televisión en español durante el verano. Entonces, en una semana, necesitas mirar la televisión un total de 30 minutos y escribir un resumen (por lo menos un párrafo) en español de lo que miraron. Puede ser una película (hispana, no pueden mirar una película estadounidense), un programa, deportes, dibujos animados, una telenovela, etc. Necesitas hacer esto tres veces. (es decir – tres semanas diferentes). Netflix tiene muchos programas en español para ver. NO QUIERO EXTRAS (ya han visto Extras mil veces).

              II. Segunda parte

              Vas a buscar en el Internet tres artículos (mínimo de 12 oraciones cada uno) de noticias en español (de cualquier país) sobre el tema de desafíos mundiales y hacer un resumen en español según el bosquejo. Puede ser de cualquier de los subtemas (la economía, medio ambiente, el pensamiento filosófico y la religión, la población y la demografía, el bienestar social, la conciencia social). Necesitas incluir el subtema en el resumen. No puedens tener más de un artículo de la misma semana y tienes que tener la fecha. Necesitas ‘post’ su artículo y resumen en el google classroom.

              III. Tercera parte

              Este verano, vas a preparar una presentación de powerpoint para mostrarle a la clase en septiembre. Esta presentación va a representar tu autobiografía con los siguientes tópicos. También, necesitas escribir una página (escrita a máquina) en forma de ensayo con la información de tu autobiografía.

              a.Mi niñez / juventud

              b.Mis escuelas

              c.Mis memorias favoritas hasta ahora

              d.Mis actividades

              **Solo necesitan tener algunas fotos en tus slides con los ‘headings’. No hay un número específico de slides que necesitas, pero yo recomiendo:

              1 slide de tu niñez

              1 slide de la escuela primaria/middle school

              1 o 2 slides de tus memorias favoritas

              1 o 2 slides de tus actividades ahora


              Fechas importantes:

              El 22 de julio: artículo 1 y primera tarea de la tele

              El 5 de agosto: artículo 2 y segunda tarea de la tele

              El 19 de agosto: artículo 3 y tercera tarea de la tele

              El 2 de septiembre: la presentación de powerpoint y ensayo de autobiografía

              Resúmenes de los artículos necesitan tener la siguiente información:

              Busca un artículo de los desafíos mundiales:

              Subtema:

              ¿De dónde es tu artículo?

              ¿Quiénes son las personas principales en tu artículo?

              En seis oraciones, escribe un resumen en tus propias palabras del artículo.

              ¿Cómo se compara el contenido de este artículo con los Estados Unidos?


              Nota de la tarea de verano de 5AP

              1. Primer artículo _____ (5 puntos)

              2. segundo artículo _____ (5 puntos)

              3. tercer artículo _____ (5 puntos)

              4. primera tarea de la tele _____ (5 puntos)

              5. segunda tarea de la tele _____ (5 puntos)

              6. tercera tarea de la tele _____ (5 puntos)

              7. autobiografía escrita _____ (18 puntos)

              8. presentación _____ (32 puntos)

              Total: _____ (80 puntos)

              Presentación:

              Categoría

              1

              2

              3

              4

              Gramática

              Muchos errores de estructuras simples. Los errores se repiten mucho.

              Varios errores de la gramática. Hay problemas con los tiempos verbales y las conjugaciones.

              Tiene errores, pero no son muy repetidos ni de estructuras básicas.

              Tiene muy pocos errores. Buen control de los tiempos verbales.

              Pronunciación

              Hay muchos errores de pronunciación.

              Tiene pronunciación bastante buena.

              Tiene pronunciación buena.

              Tiene pronunciación excelente.

              Contenido

              Falta información. No hay muchas fotos.

              Tiene toda la información, pero es muy básica. Hay algunas fotos.

              Tiene información buena con algunas detalles. Hay varias fotos

              Tiene información muy completa con muchos detalles. Hay muchas fotos.

              Gramática: x3

              Pronunciación: x2

              Contenido: x3

              Printable Version of Summer AP Spanish Assignment Available Here

              AP French

              Français V – AP

              Mme Carpinella

              Travail d’été

              2017

              Lecture d’AP:

              1.Lisez les lectures d’AP French nommées dessous. Complétez le « Google Form » qui correspond à chaque lecture. (Il y en a quatre).

              • AP French selection A35 p 72-73 (7)
              • AP French selection A10 p 22-23 (8)
              • AP French selection A36 p 74-75 (7)
              • Ap French selection A24 p 50-50 (8)

              Un film :

              2.Comment les films français/francophones diffèrent des films faits pour les Américains ? Regarder un film français (il doit être un film français/francophone, pas un film américain que vous avez regardé en français). Ensuite, faites une critique dans laquelle vous comparez ce film fait pour le public français/francophone et ceux faits pour les spectateurs américains. Comment ce film serait-il différent s’il avait été fait pour les Américains ? Ecrivez deux pages tapées à double interligne.

              Votre vie :

              3.Votre autobiographie : Préparez une présentation de votre vie jusqu’à ce moment-là.

                • Quels sont les moments les plus importants de votre vie jusqu’à maintenant ? Vous pouvez aussi parler un peu à la fin de vos espoirs pour votre dernière année au lycée et ce que vous voulez faire après.
                • Présentation : Faire un document Slides/PowerPoint que vous présenterez la première semaine d’école. Il faut avoir des photos !

              §N’ayez pas plus d’une ou deux phrases/propositions d’explication sur chaque page. Je veux que vous expliquiez pas lisiez ce que vous avez mis sur la diapo. Le moins d’écriture sur la page, le mieux !

                • Soyez prêt(e) à présenter le deuxième/troisième jour d’école.

              Soyez sûr(e) de taper tous les accents !!!!!

              Dates limites :

              • Voilà les dates limites suggérées :
                • Partie I : le 22 juillet
                • Partie II : le 14 août
                • Partie III : le 7 septembre
              • Il faut rendre tout le travail d’été le premier jour d’école au plus tard.

              Il faut rendre tout le travail à Google Classroom. Si vous n’avez pas accès à l’Internet cet été vous pouvez rendre tout le travail au début de l’année scolaire ou venez me voir pour un devoir alterné.

              Pour résumer :

              le 21 juillet

              le 13 août

              le 6 septembre

              4 lectures d’AP French

              Critique du film

              La présentation

              * Dates limites suggérées

              La note : Le travail d’été vaudra un examen et sera noté à la base des barèmes postés indiqués au-dessous.

              Barème :

              Quatre lectures (30)

              Film : Notée sur le barème de rédaction AP (sera posté à GC). 35 points.

              Présentation : Notée sur le barème de Présentations AP (sera posté à GC). 35 points.

              FAITES ATTENTION AU PLAGIAT :

              • Ne copiez pas le travail de vos camarades de classe.
              • N’employez pas un traducteur.
              • Utilisez vos propres mots pour faire les résumés des reportages et des articles.
              • Evidemment les problèmes de plagiat seront traités selon les règles de BHS.

              Merci beaucoup ! J’espère que vous vous amuserez cet été ! (et pas seulement travailler…)

              Je serai heureuse de vous voir en septembre ! Vous êtes terminaux maintenant, je ne peux pas le croire !!!

              -Mme Carpinella

              Printable Version of Summer AP French Assignment Available Here

              2017 Summer Art Materials - Select Course Below

              AP Studio Art

              A.P STUDIO ART
              Drawing Concentration
              Mrs. Michaelidis

              Course Description:

              A.P Studio Art is a course designed for students who are serious interested in the practical experience of art. A.P Studio Art is not based on a written exam; instead, students submit a portfolio for evaluation at the end of the school year. Students in this course will prepare this online, digital portfolio of 24 pieces for the full school year, submitting it along with a written commentary in May.

              Students portfolios are scored based on three different sections…

                • Ranges of Approaches
                • Sustained Investigation
                • Selected Works
              • Semester 1 is dedicated to the “Range of Approaches” section of the portfolio where students create 12 works that show a mastery of a variety subjects and mediums.
              • Semester 2 is dedicated to the “Sustained Investigation,” where students choose a specific topic to explore visually, creating a body of work under this chosen theme.
              • Finally, students will choose 5 pieces from both of these sections for their “Selected Works,” and will physically mail these pieces to the College Board for review of quality.

              Requirements:

                • Students wishing to take this course must have taken Fine Arts 2.
                • Students must complete an 18x24 summer assignment piece.
                • Students taking this course are required to finish the portfolio.

              There will be a review at the end of Semester 1 to see if each student is on track to finish. Do know that it is not uncommon for students to not be on track to finish. If this is the case you may not be able to continue into Semester 2. The College Board expects a lot and the work load requires much out of school work throughout the entire year to finish!

              Portfolio Sections:

              • Range of Approaches
                • Semester 1

              This semester we will be focusing on the “Range of Approaches” section of your portfolio. By the end of the semester you should have 12 finished pieces that show mastery of a variety of subject matters and mediums. It is expected that students will spend 4 to 8 hours per week on work outside of class. Much of your portfolio will be created outside of class.

              Students will be reviewed on their progress at the end of this semester. If a student is not on track to finish on time they may not be able to continue to Semester 2.

              • Sustained Investigation:
                • Semester 2

              Students will get the opportunity to come up with their own sustained investigation to explore visually. This section is creating a body of related works. When a theme is settled on, you will spend a considerable amount time developing your 12 pieces that should all visually “go” together as a set. This section should also show growth within your investigation that evolved over time through the different works created.

              At the end of the semester you should have up to 12 pieces complete, along with a written commentary describing your sustained investigation. This commentary will be uploaded to your online portfolio for review by the College Board as well.

              • Selected Works

              Over the entire year you will be choosing 5 works you have created that you will physically send in for this third and final section of the test. These are 5 actual works you will send for close review, and should demonstrate your craftsmanship in all your work. These are not 5 extra works your need to create, they will come from your “Range of Approaches” and/or your “Sustained Investigation” sections. You will choose these pieces in late April.

              Digital Images:

              • Students will need to photograph work as it is being completed. This is an often overlooked task, but is necessary for the uploading of this online portfolio. Students are expected to photograph work professionally and will learn how to do this.

              Grades:

              • Expectations are based on the range of accomplishments of other AP Art classes and the evidence of thought, care, and effort demonstrated in the work. All students in AP have talent and should receive an “A” if work is turned in on time. A “B” indicates deadlines are not being met or the student is not putting forth enough effort in the artwork. A”C” at progress report or term end indicates that the student is probably not ready to take the class at this time, and should consider a less demanding option, possibly joining Fine Art 3.


              Printable Version of AP Studio Art Syllabus Available Here

              A.P. Studio Art
              Drawing Concentration
              Summer Assignment

              Self-Portrait in the Style of…

              This will be your first piece for the “Range of Approaches” section of your portfolio. This first project must be done on 18 x 24 sized paper (or canvas). Before you leave for summer break I can provide you with paper, so see me before you leave! This project is expected to be complete on the first day we return to school in the fall.

              For this project I would like you to focus on one artist who will be the inspiration for a self-portrait that you will create for the “Range of Approaches” section of your A.P. portfolio. You can use whatever medium you feel most comfortable using, as long as it has the ability to portray the style of the artist you have chosen!

              The following are a list of suggested artists for you to research. They represent many different time periods and movements within art history. Your finished piece should exhibit the usual elements of a serious, well-planned, finished project: an interesting composition, conscious color choices, experimentation with media, technical proficiency and attention to details.

              Some artists for you to look up (you may use others, though please run them by Ms. Michaelidis first)

              • Rembrandt
              • Gustave Courbet
              • Vincent Van Gogh
              • Egon Schiele
              • Max Beckmann
              • Frida Kahlo
              • Andy Warhol
              • David Hockney
              • Alex Katz
              • Chuck Close
              • Cindy Sherman
              • Nikki Lee
              • Alice Neel
              • Alice Mendieta
              • Philip Guston
              • Kehinde Wiley
              • Paula Rego
              • Marlene Dumas
              • Jim Dine
              • Romare Bearden
              • Joan Miro
              • Pablo Picasso
              • Lucian Freud
              • Henri Matisse
              • Paul Gaugin
              • Paula Modersohn-Becker
              • Takashi Murakami
              • Artemesia Gentileschi
              • Robert Rauchenberg
              • Red Grooms
              • Leonardo Da Vinci
              • Roy Lichtenstein
              • Norman Rockwell
              • Henri Rousseau
              • Salvador Dali
              • Grant Wood
              • Mary Cassatt
              • Laylah Ali
              • Jean-Michel Basquiat
              • Jasper Johns
              • Georges de la Tour
              • Albrecht Durer
              • Elizabeth Peyton
              • Amedeo Modigliani


              Printable Version of AP Studio Art Summer Assignment Available Here